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  • 1.
    Dew, K. N.
    et al.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Stockholm University.
    Rosner, D. K.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Thayer, A.
    Immersive Experiences Lab of HP Labs.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Producing Printability: Articulation Work and Alignment in 3D Printing2019In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 433-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional printing is widely celebrated as enabling open design and manufacturing practice. With easy-to-use techniques such as automated modeling, fabrication machines ostensibly help designers turn ideas into fully fledged objects. Prior HCI literature focuses on improving printing through optimization and by developing printer and material capabilities. This paper expands such considerations by asking, how do 3D printing practitioners understand and create “printability?” And how might HCI better support the work that holds together printing workflows and changing ecosystems of materials and techniques? We conducted studies in two sites of open design: a technology firm in Silicon Valley, California and a makerspace in Stockholm, Sweden. Deploying workshops and interviews, we examine how practitioners negotiate the print experience, revealing a contingent process held together by trial and error exploration and careful interventions. These insights point to the value of tools and processes to support articulation work, what Strauss and colleagues have called the acts of fitting together people, tasks, and their ordering to accomplish an overarching project. We show that despite the sought-after efficiencies of such manufacturing, 3D printing entails articulation work, particularly acts of alignment, exposing messy modes of production carried out by a varied cast of practitioners, machines, and materials.

  • 2.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Stockholm University.
    Make it or break it: Grappling with inclusion in the maker movement2019In: Making culture: Children’s and young people’s leisure cultures / [ed] Anna Sparrman, Göteborg: Kulturanalys Norden , 2019, p. 51-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Making culture is a research anthology focusing on children’s and young people’s leisure culture. Nineteen researchers from the Nordic countries have been invited by the Nordic Agency for Cultural Policy Analysis (Kulturanalys Norden) to explore, describe and analyse how children and young people act as cultural ‘doers’. The anthology provides researchers, policymakers and practitioners with insights and analyses on children’s and young people’s culture.

  • 3.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    On Making and Failing2017In: CHI'17 Workshop positioning paper – Open Design at the Intersection between Making and Manufacturing, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Making is ubiquitous. We all make things. Or maybe we don’t. But we could. The equipment is there, the tools and the skills can be learned. The expertise and the spaces shared. However, despite popularly stated, not everyone is a maker. Who gets to participate in making and what sites and voices are excluded? This short paper provokes questions on the interest in making, the continuous notion of empowerment and demands to #failharder.

    Download full text (pdf)
    On Making and Failing
  • 4.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    The Forensics of Transient Computational Materials2016In: Nordi'CHI 2016 Workshop. Things Fall Apart: Unpacking the Temporalities of Impermanence for HCI, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic components and computational artifacts tend to have a short lifespan. When they age, they become obsolete and lose their value and meaning. In a case where members of a makerspace investigate an old artifact with electronic components, we use the notion of forensics to describe how the lost meanings of discarded objects can be revived, and how the acts of inquiry around these objects and materials also bring new meaning to the objects at hand. This points to an alternative perspective on the transiency of electronic materials, where the focus is not on prolonging their lifespan, but rather on how such objects and materials can become meaningful after their “death”.

    Download full text (pdf)
    The Forensics of Transient Computational Materials fulltext
  • 5.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    The organization of personal fabrication: Hackathons and makerspaces as semi-professional places for creative making2015In: On website for workshop "The Future of Making: Where Industrial and Personal Fabrication Meet", 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Maker and DIY cultures, as well as the trend towards personal fabrication have gained recent visibility in HCI research. While first reflecting on makers as a new user and “social actor”, current rhetoric has shifted towards the maker movement’s potential for empowerment and democratization. By focusing on places and the organization of personal fabrication we are drawing lines between amateur vs. professional, and home vs. work settings as well as leisure vs. educational motivations. Here we discuss and map out the characteristics of semi-professional places for making in the light of a small study from a hackathon event.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Sydow_Jonsson_The organization of personal fabrication: Hackathons and makerspaces as semi-professional places for creative making
  • 6.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    "It's a Bomb!" - Material Literacy and Narratives of Making2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 121-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

1 - 6 of 6
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