sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cuestas-Caza, Javier
    et al.
    Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lembke, Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    Andean Intercultural Ecosocialism in times of Buen-Vivir?: A Red-Green-Culturalist Approach2020In: Challenging the Right, Augmenting the Left: Recasting Leftist Imagination / [ed] Robert Latham, A. T. Kingsmith, Julian von Bargen & Niko Block, Black Point: Fernwood Publishing, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Andean Intercultural Ecosocialism in times of Buen-Vivir
  • 2.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Eguiguren Riofrío, María Beatriz
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, Ecuador.
    Vera, Ana Karina
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, Ecuador.
    Reyes, Maleny
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, Ecuador.
    Espinosa, Gabriela
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, Ecuador.
    Lembke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Indigenous Gold Mining in the Kenkuim Shuar Community: A Decolonial and Postcapitalist Approach to Sustainability2021In: Revista iberoamericana de estudios de desarrollo / Iberoamerican Journal of Development Studies, E-ISSN 2254-2035, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 178-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the experiences of the small Shuar community of Kenkuim (Congüime) in the Ecuadorian Amazon that since 2016 carries out gold mining through the communitarian company Exploken Minera. The case is unique in South America, not only for being the only example of indigenous mining granted formal state concession, but also for its green profile, without the usage of chemicals or heavy metals. Within a setting of expanding extractivism conditioned by global capitalism and a theoretical framework of a decolonial and postcapitalist approach to sustainability, this ethnographic study deals with the expressions of resistance and adaptation of the Kenkuim community and how socio-cultural, ecological, and economic values are articulated by Shuar actors in relation to the new indigenous mining project. The results indicate that this mining experiment constitutes a meaningful alternative to destructive extractivismin line with decolonial and postcapitalist reasoning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Online-first version of article
  • 3.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Eguiguren Riofrío, María Beatriz
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja.
    Vera, Ana Karina
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja.
    Reyes, Maleny
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja.
    Espinosa, Gabriela
    Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja.
    Lembke, Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    Una ecología política de minería indígena responsable: Dilemas, disputas y desafíos en la comunidad Shuar de Congüime de la Amazonía ecuatoriana2020In: Revista Chilena de Derecho y Ciencia Política, ISSN 0718-9389, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 66-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2016, the Shuar indigenous community of Congüime in the Ecuadorian Amazon has held the gold mining concession in its territory through the community company Exploken Minera. With its mission of socially and ecologically responsible mining, investing the incomes in the community and without using chemicals or heavy metals, this unique model contrasts with transnational and illegal mining in indigenous territories. The present ethnographic study, which draws theoretical and methodological inspiration from political ecology, environmental justice, post-development and the conceptualization of real utopias, deals with the experiences of socio-environmental governance and justice of the Shuar mining company, and the dilemmas, disputes and challenges that emerge in the community in this unprecedented situation. The result indicates that structural challenges remain unsolved. While Exploken's experiments in socio-ecological responsibility constitute an alternative to destructive extractivism, and considering the improved living conditions enjoyed by many Shuar families, new social tensions have emerged in Congüime, including transformations of social power structures.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Lalander et al. Shuar Conguime RChDCP2020
  • 4.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lembke, M.
    Stockholm University.
    The Andean Catch-22: ethnicity, class and resource governance in Bolivia and Ecuador2018In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 636-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the tensions and contradictions between resource governance, welfare policies, and the constitutionally recognized rights of nature and the indigenous peoples in Bolivia and Ecuador. We have identified a certain reductionism in current debates on these issues and propose a more systematic analytical focus on class and the class-ethnicity duality, as expressed in historical and contemporary indigenous struggles, and also confirmed via our ethnographic material. Drawing on the double bind as expressed in Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 wherein the protagonists face situations in which they do not have any choice to achieve a net gain, this article centres on how national governments have to choose between the protections of rights – in this case ethnic and environmental rights – and welfare provision financed by extractive revenues. From the perspective of ecologically concerned indigenous actors, the Catch-22 is articulated in the choice or compromise between universal welfarism on the one hand, and ethno-environmental concerns on the other hand. The article draws primarily on ecosocialist arguments and on indigenous-culturalist perspectives on Good Life (Sumak Kawsay or Vivir Bien). A central finding is the existence of awareness among involved actors – oppositional movements and government authorities – that the Catch-22 quandary and joint class-ethnic concerns are unavoidable ingredients in their discourses, struggles, and understandings of Good Life.

  • 5.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lembke, Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    Ospina Peralta, Pablo
    Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar, Quito.
    Political economy of state-indigenous liaisons: Ecuador in times of Alianza PAIS2019In: Revista Europea de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe / European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, ISSN 0924-0608, E-ISSN 1879-4750, no 108, p. 193-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the contentious liaisons between the indigenous movement and the state in Ecuador during the government of Alianza PAIS under the presidency of Rafael Correa (2007-2017). The research question examines to which measure, how and why the shift from neoliberal to leftist administrations could have affected the principal strategic repertoire of the indigenous movement. Leaning on a political economy approach and social movement theorizing, and accentuating the relative power balance between the indigenous movement and the state, it focuses on indigenous oppositional strategies and the ambivalent attitude of the state regarding participatory democracy and the rights of the indigenous peoples. By contrasting this period with the neoliberal 1990s – considered the heyday of the indigenous struggle – we examine contemporary strategic responses of the movement amidst the new political setting characterized by hyper-presidentialism and a systematic effort to de-corporatize the state. A central finding is that, while retaining its powerful organizational network which could be reactivated during critical situations, the indigenous movement weakened in relation to the 1990s. This relative decline is manifested in three types of social movement relationships: between leaders and grassroots (mobilizing capacity); between the movement and its alliance partners (alliance politics); and between the movement and the legal institutional terrain of the state (institutional participation).

    Download full text (pdf)
    Lalander Lembke Ospina 2019
  • 6.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lembke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Porsani, Juliana
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Livelihood Alterations and Indigenous Innovators in the Ecuadorian Amazon2023In: Alternautas, E-ISSN 2057-4924, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 95-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article approaches livelihood alterations in Indigenous communities of the Ecuadorian Amazon as means of adaptation and resistance to socio-environmental impacts brought along by the expansion of global capitalism. The cases comprise collective Indigenous endeavors in typically capitalist sectors -tourism and mining -illustrated by the experiences of Kichwa community tourism in Shiripuno in the central Amazon, and sustainable mining in the southern Amazonian Shuar community of Congüime (Kenkuim). Theaim is to unravel these emerging livelihood strategies in relation to Indigenous ethno-cultural identity. Methodologically, we rely on comparative and ethnographic work in the field with Indigenous actors, and on a theoretical framework anchored in the concepts of innovators, cultural boundary changes (Fredrik Barth), social fields of force (William Roseberry), and intercultural regimes (Fernando Galindo and Xavier Albó). In both empirical cases -Indigenous-controlled tourism and mining -communities are framing their ethnic identity to engage with, and positively reposition themselves in relation to the wider society. We hold that these endeavors must be comprehended as highly innovative, and that indigeneity and cultural boundaries can be strengthened bysocio-cultural changes toward livelihoods previously considered as “unauthentic” or “non-Indigenous”. We also argue that these new livelihood orientations have (purposely) altered gender relations within the communities in benefit of women. Additionally, our cases suggest that cultural strengthening and gender empowerment, among other positive outcomes, requires a nuanced apprehension of indigeneity as a partly floating concept and instrument gaining ground amid the increasing interconnectedness of ancienttraditions and capitalist modernity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Livelihood Alterations and Indigenous Innovatorsin the Ecuadorian Amazon
  • 7.
    Lalander, Rickard
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Magnus, Lembke
    Stockholms universitet.
    Territorialidad, indigeneidad y diálogo intercultural en Ecuador: Dilemas y desafíos en el proyecto del Estado Plurinacional2018In: Territorialidades otras: Visiones alternativas de la tierra y del territorio desde Ecuador / [ed] Johannes Waldmüller & Philipp Altmann, Quito: Ediciones La Tierra , 2018, p. 183-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    LalanderLembke2018TerritorioPrePubl
  • 8.
    Lembke, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Galindo, J. Fernando
    Universidad Mayor de San Simón, Cochabamba, Bolivia.
    Objectivities and Trust in Ethnographic Research On and With Latin American Indigenous Peoples2020In: Co-creating Actionable Science: Reflections from the Global North and South / [ed] Gloria L. Gallardo Fernández, Fred Saunders, Tatiana Sokolova, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2020, p. 13-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter deals with an inevitable form of subjectivity in field-oriented research on and with ethnically defined peoples in Latin America. It asks whether ethnographers can enter a research field marked by historical injustices and highly asymmetric power struggles without losing the standpoint of value-free outsiders. We argue that scholars in the field are not disconnected from local cultural and institutional settings, they cannot expect to conduct fieldwork without a substantial degree of subjectivity. Theoretically, a distinction is made between fieldwork and work in the field, emphasizing the often-dual position of researchers: as scholars and activists. We argue that an activist stance is sometimes necessary, though stressing that the primary position must always be that of the scholar, particularly in those highly conflictive fields which often characterise the societal periphery of the Global South. Ethnographers are not merely spectators. Interpretations and conclusions will be affected by the passions and ideological positions encountered in the field. Moreover, ethnographers frequently enter the field with worldviews determined beforehand, a predisposition that may generate misunderstandings, exaggerations or even prejudice. Methodologically, the text draws on decades of fieldwork on indigenous peoples´ struggles and conflicts in Bolivia, Ecuador and Guatemala. The text problematizes the intricate intersection between objectivity and research, on the one side, and trust and subjectivity, on the other. The authors conclude by stressing the importance of upholding an “objectivity” that does not clash with the basic premises of a communal narrative rooted in historical experiences and structural perceptions of the world. Situational and relational subjectivity is thus inevitable, but that does not imply that the ambition of academic objectivity must be sacrificed. Such objectivity should not be conflated with “neutrality”, lexically speaking. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    SubjectivitiesLembkeLalanderGalindo2020prepubl
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf