sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    DeVylder, Jordan E
    et al.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain / CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
    Unick, Jay
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Oh, Hans
    University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, USA / Prevention Research Center, Oakland, USA.
    Nam, Boyoung
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Stress Sensitivity and Psychotic Experiences in 39 Low- and Middle-Income Countries2016In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1353-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress has a central role in most theories of psychosis etiology, but the relation between stress and psychosis has rarely been examined in large population-level data sets, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. We used data from 39 countries in the World Health Survey (n = 176 934) to test the hypothesis that stress sensitivity would be associated with psychotic experiences, using logistic regression analyses. Respondents in low-income countries reported higher stress sensitivity (P < .001) and prevalence of psychotic experiences (P < .001), compared to individuals in middle-income countries. Greater stress sensitivity was associated with increased odds for psychotic experiences, even when adjusted for co-occurring anxiety and depressive symptoms: adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) = 1.17 (1.15-1.19) per unit increase in stress sensitivity (range 2-10). This association was consistent and significant across nearly every country studied, and translated into a difference in psychotic experience prevalence ranging from 6.4% among those with the lowest levels of stress sensitivity up to 22.2% among those with the highest levels. These findings highlight the generalizability of the association between psychosis and stress sensitivity in the largest and most globally representative community-level sample to date, and support the targeting of stress sensitivity as a potential component of individual- and population-level interventions for psychosis.

  • 2.
    Kantrowitz, Joshua T.
    et al.
    Schizophrenia Research Center, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY / Columbia University, New York.
    Leitman, David I.
    University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
    Lehrfeld, Jonathan M.
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Juslin, Patrik N.
    Uppsala University.
    Butler, Pamela D.
    Schizophrenia Research Center, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY / New York University, New York.
    Silipo, Gail
    Schizophrenia Research Center, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY .
    Javitt, Daniel C.
    Schizophrenia Research Center, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY / New York University, New York.
    Reduction in Tonal Discriminations Predicts Receptive Emotion Processing Deficits in Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder2013In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 86-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Schizophrenia patients show decreased ability to identify emotion based upon tone of voice (voice emotion recognition), along with deficits in basic auditory processing. Interrelationship among these measures is poorly understood. Methods: Forty-one patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and 41 controls were asked to identify the emotional valence (happy, sad, angry, fear, or neutral) of 38 synthesized frequency-modulated (FM) tones designed to mimic key acoustic features of human vocal expressions. The mean (F0M) and variability (F0SD) of fundamental frequency (pitch) and absence or presence of high frequency energy (HF500) of the tones were independently manipulated to assess contributions on emotion identification. Forty patients and 39 controls also completed tone-matching and voice emotion recognition tasks. Results: Both groups showed a nonrandom response pattern (P < .0001). Stimuli with highest and lowest F0M/F0SD were preferentially identified as happy and sad, respectively. Stimuli with low F0M and midrange F0SD values were identified as angry. Addition of HF500 increased rates of angry and decreased rates of sad identifications. Patients showed less differentiation of response across frequency changes, leading to a highly significant between-group difference in response pattern to maximally identifiable stimuli (d = 1.4). The differential identification pattern for FM tones correlated with deficits in basic tone-matching ability (P = .01), voice emotion recognition (P < .001), and negative symptoms (P < .001). Conclusions: Specific FM tones conveyed reliable emotional percepts in both patients and controls and correlated highly with deficits in ability to recognize information based upon tone of voice, suggesting significant bottom-up contributions to social cognition and negative symptom impairments in schizophrenia.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf