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  • 1.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    English-language swearing as humor in Swedish comic strips2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 121, p. 175-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate the Swedish, non-native use of English swear words in Swedish-language comic strips. I first consider the established relationships between both swearing and humor, and comics and humor. I propose that swear word usage and the comic strip framework contribute to a mutual feedback loop, whereby the comic strip derives its humor from the use of English swear words, while at the same time the comic strip context, by invoking a play frame, primes the swear word usage for humorous interpretation. Modeling Siegel (1995), I then consider how a code-switch to English serves as a framing device or contextualization cue for humor in Swedish-language contexts. The analysis of a selection of Swedish comic strips draws from the Encryption Theory of Humor (Flamson and Barrett, 2008), and suggests that humor created via the Swedish practice of swearing in English is a function of shared background knowledge that capitalizes on the fundamental incongruity of two discourse systems operating under different norms of appropriateness.

  • 2.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    The Oxford Handbook of Taboo Words and Language, Keith Allen (Ed.), Oxford University, Press, Oxford (2018), 464 pp., ISBN: 9780198808190, GBP 110,002020In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 155, p. 358-361Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Stapleton, K.
    Ulster University, United Kingdom.
    Everybody swears on Only Murders in the Building: The interpersonal functions of scripted television swearing2023In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 216, p. 93-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swearing fulfils a range of interpersonal pragmatic functions and also acts as a distinguishing feature of speakers and contexts. In broadcast media, swearing has traditionally been censored or at least limited in its deployment; although when used, it serves characterization, interactional, and narrative functions. In this article, we consider the Disney+ television series Only Murders in the Building (OMITB, 2021–), in which swearing is not subject to standard media constraints, due to its provision on a streaming service. Freed from such constraints, OMITB is distinctive in its unusually high frequency and dispersion of swearing across characters and contexts. Compared with both real-life and media-based analyses of language use, the swearing in OMITB reflects neither real-life nor standard broadcast patterns. In this paper, we investigate how swearing is used by the characters, and what it is ‘doing’ in the series. In particular, we highlight the role of swearing in affiliation and relationship-building, both between characters in the story world, and between the series and its viewers. Our analysis contributes to understanding the pragmatic functions of media swearing.

  • 4.
    Brumark, Åsa
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    Non-observance of Gricean maxims in family dinner table conversation2006In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1206-1238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study addresses the issue of indirect speech and implication in family dinner conversations, viewed from a Gricean perspective. Dinner conversations in 19 families were video recorded and analysed with regard to acts of non-observance (i.e. flouting or violating) of Gricean maxims. The recordings were divided into two groups in terms of the age of participating children (6-10 or 10-14 years respectively). The results gave no evidence that the degree of non-observance differed between the two age groups or between mothers and fathers totally, thus not confirming findings of previous studies [Rundquist, S., 1992. Indirectness: a gender study of flouting Grice's maxims. Journal of Pragmatics 18, 431-449]. But quantitative data showed variations regarding the distribution of different contexts and types of non-observance between the two groups of fathers and between the two groups of mothers, as well as between the groups of children and between the parents and children of the two groups. Furthermore, qualitative analyses suggest that fathers more often than mothers use hints for socializing purposes whereas the children, especially in the older group, seem to break against the maxims primarily for social purposes, e.g. joking.

  • 5.
    De Geer, Boel
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    "Don't say it's disgusting!" Comments on socio-moral behavior in Swedish families2004In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 1705-1725Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    De Geer, Boel
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Swedish language.
    Tulviste, Tiia
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Mizera, Luule
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Tryggvason, Marja
    Södertörn University.
    Socialization in communication: Pragmatic socialization during dinnertime in Estonian, Finnish and Swedish families2002In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 1757-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Magnusson, Simon
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Establishing jointness in proximal multiparty decision-making: The case of collaborative writing2021In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 181, p. 32-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ascertaining jointness in decision-making requires the recipients of proposals to extend the base sequence of proposal-acceptance and make room for displays of agreement. However, the extension takes different forms, depending on the number of participants receiving a proposal and when the decision is to be carried out. On the basis of video-recordings from a participatory democracy workshop, the act of collaborative writing was used to observe how proximal proposals are transformed into joint decisions. The analysis reveals that displays of access and agreement to the proposal are achieved in a distributed manner among the participants. The access component is expanded to contain actions that delimit the content and scope of the proposal. These meta-decisions then result in a writable produced by someone other than the proposer to whom agreement is displayed. Given the proximal nature of the decision-making, commitment to future action can be bypassed. Instead, execution of the decision is deployed in a manner that retrospectively presents the sequence as a joint one. The study demonstrates the significance of the temporal, social, and material aspects associated with proposing and achieving jointness in multiparty proximal decisions.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Språkrådet.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm universitet.
    Bohman, Love
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Marian, Klara Skogmyr
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Wide, Camilla
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Lindström, Jan
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    What is in a greeting?: The social meaning of greetings in Sweden-Swedish and Finland-Swedish service encounters2020In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 168, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the use of greetings in Sweden-Swedish and Finland-Swedish service encounters and the social meaning of different greeting forms. Situated within the framework of variational pragmatics, the study explores Swedish as a pluricentric language and investigates with interactional and statistical analyses to what extent the variable nation affect variation in greeting forms. While nation indeed is an important factor, the study also illustrates how social variables such as age, gender and participant roles as well as situational variables such as medium, region and venue impact the greeting choices participants make. Further, by applying an interactional analytical perspective thestudy contributes to the methodological development of variational pragmatics. This analysis shows how the sequential position of a greeting plays a part in the choice of greetings, and demonstrates that pragmatic variation emerges in interaction. The article suggests that greetings can be a resource for indexing the degree of social distance between interlocutors, and thereby manifest recurring cultural patterns.

  • 9.
    Nyroos, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sandlund, Erica
    Karlstads universitet.
    Sundqvist, Pia
    Karlstads universitet.
    Code-switched repair initiation: The case of Swedish eller in L2 English test interaction2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 120, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a long-standing interest in repair practices, much is yet to be learned about participants' selections of components of the repair operation, and their systematic variation across contexts and languages (Hayashi et al., 2013b; Kitzinger, 2013). The present paper targets the initiation of self-repair through examination of a particular discursive object, the Swedish conjunction eller ('or'), located in repair-prefacing position in a corpus of 79 second language (L2) oral proficiency tests. In the corpus, eller is systematically produced in Swedish, while surrounding talk is produced in the target language, English. As such, the repair initiations are code-switched (e.g., Auer, 1998b). Building on the recent work on or-prefaced repair initiations in English (Lerner and Kitzinger, 2015), we examine the role of eller-initiated repair (EIR), i.e., repair prefaced by eller, in the context of paired L2 tests. We also contrast EIRs with or-prefaced repair initiations in the same dataset. Findings indicate that EIRs serve to display trouble awareness, which may relate to necessary revisions of both form and content of the talk in English. The 'other-languageness' (Gafaranga, 2000) of the momentary code-switch amplifies test-takers' attention to what needs to be replaced or revised, and indicates to co-participants that self-repair is underway. The practice helps push forward turn transition and pre-empts conclusions about the speaker's stance or linguistic competence, which may be particularly relevant in a language testing context. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Peterson, Elizabeth
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Introduction to the special issue: Linguistic and pragmatic outcomes of contact with English2018In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 133, p. 105-108Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Stapleton, Karyn
    et al.
    Ulster University, UK.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Editorial: Swearing and interpersonal pragmatics2023In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 218, p. 147-152Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces broad strands of research on swearing as a foundation for an interpersonal pragmatics (IP) approach to the nature and effects of swearing in interaction and relationships. The main tenets of interpersonal pragmatics are presented, and swearing as a distinct research focus within IP is outlined. The article invokes pragmatic perspectives in addressing both negative and positive functions of swearing. The central focus on IP is developed by considering the mutual interplay between language and relationships in swearing activity. With respect to communicative context, it is noted that swearing both emerges within interpersonal relationships, and simultaneously provides a context for different types of interpersonal relationships to unfold (endogenous vs. exogenous IP perspectives). By way of introducing the special issue on swearing and interpersonal pragmatics and the constituent articles, it asserts the need to account for swearing as an interpersonal pragmatic strategy and to analyse the causes and effects of swearing in different contexts. The article concludes with a discussion of future research directions, including, in particular, swearing in mediated settings. 

  • 12. Tulviste, Tiia
    et al.
    Mizera, Luule
    De Geer, Boel
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Swedish language.
    "There is nothing bad in being talkative": Meanings of talkativeness in Estonian and Swedish adolescents2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 1603-1609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study compared the meanings of talkativeness for 216 Estonian and 163 Swedish adolescents. Although both nations have stereotypically been described as taciturn, the results of the study suggested that Estonians differed from Swedes in having a more negative or neutral attitude towards talkativeness. Swedes, on the other hand, emphasized more frequently that the positive or negative interpretation of talkativeness depends on the person, on the topic, on the amount of talk, and on the situation. Both Estonian and Swedish adolescents regarded talk as a tool for communication with others rather than a tool for self-expression. Talking for communication with others dominated in the answers of Swedes, whereas Estonians mentioned talking as a tool for conveying information as frequently as a tool for communication with others.

1 - 12 of 12
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