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  • 1.
    Bernhardsson, Josefin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholms universitet.
    Drink sluts, brats and immigrants as others: An analysis of Swedish media discourse on gender, alcohol, and rape2012In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an analysis of the media debate on two Swedish rape cases involving alcohol, the present article argues that social norms and power structures are made visible both when debaters ascribe explanatory power to alcohol and when they do not. Using feminist intersectional theory, we argue that when debaters employ the concepts of “foreign culture” and “jet-set drinking culture,” respectively, to explain the rapes, they simultaneously (re)produce stereotypical discourses on gender, sexuality, class and ethnicity/nationality. The troublesome positions of the Immigrant, the Drink Slut and the Brat symbolize how these discourses intersect in the specific cases. To understand why alcohol is central in explaining rape in a fashionable area, but not in a socially disadvantaged area, we suggest that the official image of Sweden as a gender-equal, sexually liberal and multicultural society with small class differences blocks discussion of existing inequalities within the country. When rape happens in a place constructed as a “Swedish middle- and upper-class area,” alcohol and intoxication are used to symbolize the “uncivilized,” unpleasant and malicious among Swedish men. When rape happens in “socially disadvantaged neighbourhoods” populated by “immigrants,” the unpleasant instead resides in the “foreign culture.”

  • 2.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholms universitet.
    Biologically Responsible Mothers and Girls Who “Act Like Men”: Shifting discourses of biological sex difference in Swedish newspaper debate on alcohol in 1979 and 19952011In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 197-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on a qualitative analysis of Swedish newspaper debates in 1979 and 1995, this article examines how Swedish newspapers refer to biological sex difference as central to drinking practices. The study shows that women are a special category of concern in debate about gender and drinking in both 1979 and 1995. Further, it shows that Swedish newspapers draw upon biology in different ways in the two years. In 1979, debate about drinking during pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is central and newspapers link biomedical research on FAS to the moral idea that mothers do anything to avoid harm to children. In 1995, debate about girls' drinking habits is central and newspapers link sex hormones and neurotransmitters to the moral idea that girls shouldn't “drink like men.” These differences are discussed in the context of Swedish media interest in evolutionary psychology and biomedical solutions to alcohol problems during the 1990s.

  • 3. Chidgey, Red
    et al.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Zobl, Elke
    Rumours from around the bloc: Gossip, rhizomatic media, and the PlotkiFemzine2009In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 477-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past two decades, an increasing number of young women have taken the tools of media production into their own hands; feminist zines have evolved into a medium for transnational dialogue, community building, and networking. In focusing on the Plotki Femzine (2006, 2007), a Central and Eastern European (CEE) feminist print and online zine project, we use the theoretical framework of ?rhizomatic media? to problematize existing scholarship on feminist zines. Much of this scholarship sees zines as venues that construct a sense of ?authenticity? through the use of the autobiographical voice and an outright rejection of mainstream media practices. Considering the rhizomatic processes of alternative knowledge production in Plotki publication, we draw on post-structuralist gossip theory to examine the Plotki Femzine as a site of feminist discourse. In particular, we show how the Plotki Femzine builds cross-border collaboration and "spreads rumours" of a feminist kind.

  • 4. Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Sexing the Raspberry: A brief portrait of Bitte Andersson2009In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 236-241Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Sundén, Jenny
    What Happened to Difference in Cyberspace?: The (Re)turn of the She-Cyborg2001In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 215-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Sundén, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Paasonen, S.
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Shameless hags and tolerance whores: feminist resistance and the affective circuits of online hate2018In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 643-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores shamelessness as a feminist tactic of resistance to online misogyny, hate and shaming within a Nordic context. In our Swedish examples, this involves affective reclaiming of the term “hagga” (hag), which has come to embody shameless femininity and feminist solidarity, as well as the Facebook event “Skamlös utsläckning” (shameless extinction), which extends the solidarity or the hag to a collective of non-men. Our Finnish examples revolve around appropriating derisive terms used of women defending multiculturalism and countering the current rise of nationalist anti-immigration policy and activism across Web platforms, such as “kukkahattutäti” (aunt with a flower hat) and “suvakkihuora” (“overtly tolerant whore”). Drawing on Facebook posts, blogs and discussion forums, the article conceptualizes the affective dynamics and intersectional nature of online hate against women and other others. More specifically, we examine the dynamics of shaming and the possibilities of shamelessness as a feminist tactic of resistance. Since online humor often targets women, racial others and queers, the models of resistance that this article uncovers add a new stitch to its memetic logics. We propose that a networked politics of reclaiming is taking shape, one using collective imagination and wit to refuel feminist communities.

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