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  • 1. Burström, Bo
    et al.
    Öberg, Lisa
    Södertörn University, Lärarutbildningen.
    Smedman, Lars
    Policy measures and the survival of foster infants in Stockholm 1878-19252012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 56-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: At the end of the 19th century, infant mortality was high in urban and rural areas in Sweden. In Stockholm, the mortality rate was particularly high among foster children. This study addresses the importance for health of targeted public policies and their local implementation in the reduction of excess mortality among foster children in Stockholm at the turn of the 19th century. In response to public concern, a law was passed in 1902 on inspections of foster homes. Stockholm city employed a handful of inspectors who visited foster homes and advised parents on child care and feeding. METHODS: Analysis of historical records from the City of Stockholm was combined with epidemiological analysis of mortality rates and hazard ratios on individual-level data for 112 746 children aged <1 year residing in one part of Stockholm between 1878 and 1925. Hazard ratios of mortality were calculated using Cox' regression analysis. RESULTS: Mortality rates of foster infants exceeded 300/1000 before 1903. Ten years later the mortality rates among foster children had declined and were similar to other children born in and out of wedlock. Historical accounts and epidemiological analysis of individual-level data over a longer time period showed similar results. CONCLUSIONS: Targeted policy measures to foster children may have potentiated the positive health effects of other universal policies, such as improved living conditions, clean water and sanitation for the whole population in the city, contributing to an equalization of mortality rates between different groups.

  • 2.
    Carlson, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 4, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Stockholms universitet.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 4, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Stockholms universitet.
    The social pattern of heavy drinking in Russia during transition: Evidence from Taganrog 19931998In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 280-285Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gaunt, David
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, History.
    Review of Helman CG. Culture, health and illness.2001In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 355-356Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Kulhánová, Ivana
    et al.
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Menvielle, Gwenn
    Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University Paris 06, Paris, France.
    Hoffmann, Rasmus
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Eikemo, Terje A
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands / Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Kulik, Margarete C
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Toch-Marquardt, Marlen
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands / Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Deboosere, Patrick
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallin, Estonia.
    Lundberg, Olle
    Stockholm University.
    Regidor, Enrique
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Looman, Caspar W N
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    The role of three lifestyle risk factors in reducing educational differences in ischaemic heart disease mortality in Europe2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 203-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide with a higher risk of dying among people with a lower socioeconomic status. We investigated the potential for reducing educational differences in IHD mortality in 21 European populations based on two counterfactual scenarios-the upward levelling scenario and the more realistic best practice country scenario.

    METHODS: We used a method based on the population attributable fraction to estimate the impact of a modified educational distribution of smoking, overweight/obesity, and physical inactivity on educational inequalities in IHD mortality among people aged 30-79. Risk factor prevalence was collected around the year 2000 and mortality data covered the early 2000s.

    RESULTS: The potential reduction of educational inequalities in IHD mortality differed by country, sex, risk factor and scenario. Smoking was the most important risk factor among men in Nordic and eastern European populations, whereas overweight and obesity was the most important risk factor among women in the South of Europe. The effect of physical inactivity on the reduction of inequalities in IHD mortality was smaller compared with smoking and overweight/obesity. Although the reduction in inequalities in IHD mortality may seem modest, substantial reduction in IHD mortality among the least educated can be achieved under the scenarios investigated.

    CONCLUSION: Population wide strategies to reduce the prevalence of risk factors such as smoking, and overweight/obesity targeted at the lower socioeconomic groups are likely to substantially contribute to the reduction of IHD mortality and inequalities in IHD mortality in Europe.

  • 5.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Kunst, Anton E
    University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Reduced affordability of cigarettes and socio-economic inequalities in smoking continuation in Stakhanov, Ukraine, 20092015In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 216-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent tobacco excise tax increase and economic crisis reduced cigarette affordability in Ukraine dramatically. Using survey data from Stakhanov (n = 1691), eastern Ukraine, we employed logistic regression analysis to examine whether socio-economic status was associated with the continuation of smoking in this environment in 2009. Low education (in women) and ownership of household assets (in men) were negatively associated with smoking continuation, whereas a positive association was found for personal monthly income. Our findings suggest that in a low-income setting where efficient cessation services are absent, reduced cigarette affordability may have only a limited effect in cutting down smoking.

  • 6.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Tekkel, Mare
    Kunst, Anton E
    Social determinants of ever initiating smoking differ from those of quitting: a cross-sectional study in Estonia.2007In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While educational level was the strongest predictor of ever initiating regular smoking, smoking cessation was related more directly to aspects of social disadvantage originating in adult life. To be effective, tobacco control interventions should not only target lower educated, but also those in material disadvantage.

  • 7. Lipsicas, Cendrine Bursztein
    et al.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Apter, Alan
    Bobes, Julio
    Kerkhof, Ad
    Michel, Konrad
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    van Heeringen, Kees
    Vaernik, Airi
    Schmidtke, Armin
    Immigration and recommended care after a suicide attempt in Europe: equity or bias?2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 63-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the investigation of care recommendations in the medical system across European countries to immigrants who attempted suicide. Data from seven European countries with 8865 local and 2921 immigrant person-cases were derived from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour and ensuing MONSUE (Monitoring Suicidal Behaviour in Europe) project. The relationship between immigrant status and type of aftercare recommended was analysed with binary logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, method of attempt and the Centre collecting the data. Clear disparities were identified in the care recommendation practices toward immigrants, compared with hosts, over and above differing policies by the European Centres.

  • 8. Lipsicas, Cendrine Bursztein
    et al.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Apter, Alan
    Kerkhof, Ad
    Michel, Konrad
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    van Heeringen, Kees
    Varnik, Airi
    Schmidtke, Armin
    Gender distribution of suicide attempts among immigrant groups in European countries-an international perspective2013In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies report high rates of suicide attempts for female immigrants. This study assesses variations in the distribution of suicide attempts across gender in immigrant and non-immigrant groups in Europe. Method: Data on 64 native and immigrant groups, including 17 662 local and 3755 immigrant person-cases collected, between 1989 and 2003, in 24 million person-years were derived from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour. Female-to-male ratios of suicide attempt rates (SARs) were calculated for all groups. Results: The cases were combined into four major categories: hosts; European and other Western immigrants; non-European immigrants; and Russian immigrants. The non-European immigrants included higher female SARs than the Europeans, both hosts and immigrants. Unlike the other groups, the majority of suicide attempters among the Russian immigrants in Estonia and Estonian hosts were male. This was also true for immigrants from Curacao, Iran, Libya and Sri Lanka. When the single groups with a male majority were excluded, the correlation between female and male SARs was relatively high among the European immigrants (r = 0.74, P < 0.0005) and lower among the non-European immigrants (r = 0.55, P < 0.03). Generalized estimating equation analysis yielded a highly significant difference (P < 0.0005) in gender ratios of suicide attempts between hosts (ratio 1.52) and both non-European immigrants (ratio 2.32) and Russian immigrants (0.68), but not the European immigrants. Conclusions: The higher suicide attempt rates in non-European immigrant females compared with males may be indicative of difficulties in the acculturation processes in Europe. Further understanding of factors underlying suicidal behaviour in immigrant and minority groups is necessary for planning effective prevention strategies.

  • 9.
    Manhica, H.
    et al.
    Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Niemi, M.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Gunnarsson, David
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Ståhle, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Study of Religions.
    Larsson, S.
    Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Saboonchi, F.
    Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Social participation, mental health in refugees and asylum seekers: A scoping review2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Suppl. 4, p. 482-482Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Murphy, A.
    et al.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Roberts, B.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Kenward, M. G.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    De Stavola, B. L.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    McKee, M.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Using multi-level data to estimate the effect of social capital on hazardous alcohol consumption in the former Soviet Union2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 572-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hazardous alcohol consumption is a leading cause of mortality in the former Soviet Union (fSU), but little is known about the social factors associated with this behaviour. We set out to estimate the association between individual- and community-level social capital and hazardous alcohol consumption in the fSU. Methods: Data were obtained from Health in Times of Transition 2010, a household survey of nine fSU countries (n = 18 000 within 2027 communities). Individual-level indicators of social isolation, civic participation, help in a crisis and interpersonal trust were aggregated to the community level. Adjusting for demographic factors, the association of individual- and community-level indicators with problem drinking (CAGE) and episodic heavy drinking was estimated using a population average model for the analysis of multi-level data. Results: Among men, individual social isolation [odds ratio (OR) = 1.20], community social isolation (OR = 1.18) and community civic participation (OR = 4.08) were associated with increased odds of CAGE. Community civic participation (OR = 2.91) increased the odds of episodic heavy drinking, while community interpersonal trust (OR = 0.89) decreased these odds. Among women, individual social isolation (OR = 1.30) and community civic participation (OR = 2.94) increased odds of CAGE. Conclusion: Our results provide evidence of the role of some elements of social capital in problem drinking in the fSU, and highlight the importance of community effects. The nature of civic organizations in the fSU, and the communities in which civic participation is high, should be further investigated to inform alcohol policy in the region.

  • 11. Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). University of Tokyo.
    Alcohol tax, consumption and mortality in tsarist Russia: is a public health perspective applicable?2013In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 340-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The public health perspective on alcohol comprises two main tenets: (i) population drinking impacts on alcohol-related harm and (ii) population drinking is affected by the physical and economic availability of alcohol, where alcohol taxes are the most efficient measure for regulating consumption. This perspective has received considerable empirical support from analyses of contemporary data mainly from Europe and North America. However, as yet, it has been little examined in a historical context. The aims of the present article are to use data from tsarist Russia to explore (i) the relation between changes in the tax on alcohol and per capita alcohol consumption and (ii) the relation between per capita alcohol consumption and alcohol mortality. Methods: The material comprised annual data on alcohol taxes, alcohol consumption and alcohol mortality. The tax and alcohol consumption series spanned the period 1864-1907 and the mortality data covered the period 1870-94. The data were analysed by estimating autoregressive integrated moving average models on differenced data. Results: Changes in alcohol taxes were significantly associated with alcohol consumption in the expected direction. Increases in alcohol consumption, in turn, were significantly related to increases in alcohol mortality. Conclusion: This study provides support for the utility of the public health perspective on alcohol in explaining changes in consumption and alcohol-related harm in a historical context. We discuss our findings from tsarist Russia in the light of experiences from more recent alcohol policy changes in Russia.

  • 12.
    Reile, Rainer
    et al.
    National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Factors associated with improving diet and physical activity among persons with excess body weight2019In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1166-1171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As overweight and obesity are highly prevalent in Eastern Europe, the study examined the trends and factors associated with self-reported weight reducing behaviours among individuals with excess body weight in Estonia.

    METHODS: Study used nationally representative cross-sectional data from 2006 to 2016 including 4302 men and 3627 women aged 20-64 years with excess body weight (BMI ≥ 25). Trends in the prevalence of changing eating habits and physical activity and their sociodemographic and health-related correlates were studied using descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression.

    RESULTS: Among overweight or obese respondents, 41% of men and 48% of women reported improvements in dietary habits and 19% of men and women reported increase in physical activity during the past 12 months in 2016. Positive trend for 2006-2016 regarding both outcomes was observed for men whereas no statistically significant differences were found for women. Women and those with lower than tertiary education had higher odds for reporting change in eating habits whereas older age and smoking or excessive alcohol consumption reduced the odds. Improvement in physical activity was more likely among younger respondents, women, ethnic Estonians and those with tertiary education, whereas poorer health and smoking reduced the odds. Weight-related advice from health professionals or family had strong effect on both outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: Socio-demographic and health profiles differentiate the self-reported behavioural change among persons with excess body weight. Advice from either health professionals or family may have a potential to facilitate positive changes in eating habits and physical activity among those individuals.

  • 13.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Andreev, Evgueni
    Razvodovsky, Yury
    Vågerö, Denny
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    McKee, Martin
    Alcohol poisoning in Russia and the countries in the European part of the former Soviet Union, 1970-20022007In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 444-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute alcohol poisoning has now reached unprecedented rates in parts of the ex-USSR with worrying trends among men as well as among women. Effective action by the governments concerned is now essential.

  • 14.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia..
    Razvodovsky, Yury E
    Homicide in post-Soviet Belarus: urban-rural trends2009In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is probable that a combination of factors such as high levels of poverty, the effects of alcohol consumption, as well as the poor provision of emergency medical services underlie both the high levels of lethal violence and the growing rural-urban divergence in homicide rates in contemporary Belarus. Urgent action is now needed to address the deteriorating social and economic conditions underpinning violence, especially in rural regions.

  • 15.
    Tingstedt, Olga
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Lindblad, Frank
    Uppsala University.
    Koposov, Roman
    University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Blatný, Marek
    Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Hrdlicka, Michal
    Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Uppsala University / Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT, USA / Säter Forensic Psychiatric Clinic.
    Somatic symptoms and internalizing problems in urban youth: a cross-cultural comparison of Czech and Russian adolescents.2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 480-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the association between somatic complaints and internalizing problems (anxiety, somatic anxiety and depression) is well established, it remains unclear whether the pattern of this relationship differs by gender and in different cultures. The aim of this study was to examine cross-cultural and gender-specific differences in the association between somatic complaints and internalizing problems in youth from the Czech Republic and Russia.

    Methods: The Social and Health Assessment, a self-report survey, was completed by representative community samples of adolescents, age 12-17 years, from the Czech Republic (N = 4770) and Russia (N = 2728).

    Results: A strong association was observed between somatic complaints and internalizing psychopathology. Although the levels of internalizing problems differed by country and gender, they increased together with and largely in a similar way to somatic complaints for boys and girls in both countries.

    Conclusion: The association between somatic symptoms and internalizing problems seems to be similar for boys and girls across cultures.

  • 16.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Self-reported heart symptoms are strongly linked to past and present poverty in Russia: evidence from the 1998 Taganrog interview survey2005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, p. 418-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In this Russian-Swedish collaborative study the question of how symptoms of heart disease are linked to poverty in Russia was addressed. Method: A random sample household survey was conducted in Taganrog, southern Russia. It covered questions about living circumstances, poverty and health. Health questions included both symptoms of heart problems, such as chest pain and high blood pressure, psychological problems such as depression and anxiety, as well as health-related behaviours such as alcohol drinking. Answers from 1972 women and men aged 18-70 are analysed here. Results: The poorest fifth of the population were more than twice as likely as others to report heart symptoms. Problems in affording vegetables, meat or fish, clothes and footwear were linked to heart symptoms more closely than other economic indicators, such as car ownership or ownership of consumer durables. Psychological symptoms, sleeping problems and alcohol drinking were all related to self-reported heart symptoms, but explained little of the excess risks attributable to present poverty. Childhood poverty was also linked to present heart symptoms. Conclusion: Life-time accumulated experience of economic hardship contributes to present levels of heart disease symptomology in Russia.

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