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  • 1.
    Bellander, T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Landqvist, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Becoming the expert constructing health knowledge in epistemic communities online2018In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a discourse analytic framework, the article analyses health blogs and patient’s forum discussions in which parents to children with congenital heart defects recontextualize medical professional knowledge and share their own experiences. The study show how the two types of online media may serve as a means for parents to attain expert status in their own case by sharing lay knowledge expressed as an amalgamation of the two key perspectives–professional and experienced–as an indivisible unit. Monological discourses, such as narrating, in blogs and more direct and immediate responses in forum discussions are noted as examples of differences in how medical facts are explained and negotiated, how advice is provided and how patient expertise is created. The study also show how blogs and especially forum discussions are used to problematize the validity of actions and opinions of medical staff. The role of developing patient expertise in epistemic communities online may therefore come with a risk of spreading misrepresentation of medical cases. 

  • 2.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Labour of Media Use: The Two Active Audiences2012In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 796-814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ‘active audience’ has theoretically been conceptualized from two perspectives: in political economy, it is suggested that television audiences work for the networks while watching and that they contribute to the valorization process with their labour. Although contested, it has survived among media scholars, also feeding into the discussion on web surveillance techniques. The other conceptualization comes from reception theory, media ethnography and cultural studies, where the interpretive work by audiences is seen as productive and resulting in identities, taste cultures and social difference. This article relates these perspectives by considering audiences as involved in two production–consumptions circuits: (1) the viewer activities produce social difference (identities and cultural meaning) in a social and cultural economy, which is then (2) made the object of productive consumption as part of the activities of the media industries, the end product being economic profit.This article argues for the relevance of analysing these as separate circuits, with different kinds of labour at their centre, and that recent debates on the active audience often misrecognize the difference.

  • 3.
    Ferlander, Sara
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Sociology and Contemporary History, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). University of Stirling, United Kingdom .
    Timms, Duncan
    Bridging the dual digital divide: A local net and an IT-café in Sweden.2006In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 137-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Book review: E. Dianne Locker & Ted D. Naylor (eds), Digital Divides: Youth, Equity, and InformationTechnology2012In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 325-327Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Velkova, Julia
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kaun, Anne
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Algorithmic resistance: Media practices and the politics of repair2019In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article constitutes a critical intervention in the current, dramatic debate on the consequences of algorithms and automation for society. While most research has focused on negative outcomes, including ethical problems of machine bias and accountability, little has been said about the possibilities of users to resist algorithmic power. The article draws on Raymond Williams’ work on media as practice to advance a framework for studying algorithms with a focus on user agency. We illustrate this framework with the example of the media activist campaign World White Web by the Swedish artist and visual designer Johanna Burai. We suggest that user agency in relation to algorithms can emerge from alternative uses of platforms, in the aftermath of algorithmic logics, and give birth to complicit forms of resistance that work through ‘repair’ politics oriented towards correcting the work of algorithms. We conclude with a discussion of the ways in which the proposed framework helps us rethink debates on algorithmic power.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-02-26 08:00
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