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  • 1.
    Gentile, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Helsinki, Finland.
    The "soviet" factor: Exploring perceived housing inequalities in a midsized city in the Donbas, Ukraine2015In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 696-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I revisit the role of Soviet legacy factors in explaining todays housing inequalities in a midsized post-Soviet city by investigating social, demographic, economic and geographic determinants of perceived housing quality. Building on a sample survey dataset (n = 3,000) that brings together both Soviet legacy effects and more universal influences on housing inequality, it is shown that various aspects of Soviet housing policy can be traced as well-preserved legacies today. The survey was conducted in 2009 in Stakhanov, Ukraine, and the method of analysis is binomial logistic regression. By capturing both the social costs attributed to the post-Soviet transition crisis as well as the underlying legacy factors inherited from the Soviet epoch, the findings suggest that any analysis of housing inequalities or residential segregation in the post-socialist city must come to terms with the impacts of socialist-era economic priorities on the urban social landscape.

  • 2. Gentile, Michael
    Urban residential preferences and satisfaction in the former Soviet Union: Results from a survey in Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan2005In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 296-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and analyses the geography and structure of the neighborhood residential preferences and residential satisfaction of the inhabitants of the medium-sized, post-Soviet city of Ust'-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan (population ca. 300,000). It is based on a questionnaire survey (N = 1516 + 320) conducted by the author in cooperation with the statistical authority of the Eastern Kazakhstan oblast'. At the aggregate level, the evidence that is presented suggests distinct preference patterns, and that the main focus of preference is on the city center. The geography of residential satisfaction is different. Differences in satisfaction have been found between residents of housing built by former high-priority enterprises and those occupying most of the remainder of the housing stock. These differences underscore the pervasive and continuing importance of the legacy of Soviet economic and territorial planning, and the still rather limited changes that the marketization of the economy has been able to produce.

  • 3.
    Gentile, Michael
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Marcinczak, Szymon
    No more work for Stakhanov: migrants and stayers in teh depopulating Donbas, Ukraine2012In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 401-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labor migration from the less to the more affluent cities and regions is a defining trait of the patterns of population redistribution in Central and Eastern Europe, especially in the former Soviet Union, where international disparities in income and living standards are particularly manifest. While these macro-trends are well portrayed in the literature, their outcome at the household level seldom figures in the literature. In Ukraine, labor out-migration to Russia is a frequently chosen strategy, not least because of the Russophone background of eastern Ukraine and of many of the major cities, including Kiev and Odessa. This out-migration contributes to urban decline. Using multivariate methods, we analyze the characteristics of population subgroups with and without the experience of working abroad. We also use descriptive statistics to assess the impact of migration events within households on the standard of living of the latter. Our data source is the city of Stakhanov Health Interview Survey 2009 (n = 3,000).

  • 4. Marcinczak, Szymon
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Umeå University.
    Stepniak, Marcin
    Paradoxes of (Post)Socialist Segregation: Metropolitan Sociospatial Divisions Under Socialism and After In Poland2013In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 327-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The state of the art in research on residential segregation and concentr= ion in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) largely focuses on process descri= ion (e.g., the multitude of works on gentrification and suburbanization).= ven though major advances in the conceptualization and measurement of seg= gation have been made, works that scrutinize the patterns of segregation = d/or concentration in CEE are rare, while studies that simultaneously exp= re and link segregation patterns under socialism and after are virtually = nexistent. Relying on Polish census-tract level data on the educational s= ucture of population in 1978, 1988, and 2002, this study explores the pat= rns of social segregation and concentration in the three major Polish cit= s (Warsaw, Cracow, and od), representing different paths of development u= er socialism and after. The results show that the population of the three= ajor Polish cities was still socially heterogeneous at the census tract l= el in 2002. ! he results also reveal that the level of social residential segregation i= the three cities has been decreasing steadily since 1978, irrespective of= he prevailing economic system.

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