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  • 1.
    Dahl, Ulrika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Guest Editors’ Introduction: Somatechnical Figurations2013In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge. Avdelningen för etnologi, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, Lunds universitet.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Avdelningen för etnologi, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, Lunds universitet.
    The Complexities of Victimhood: Insights from the Organ Trade2015In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 32-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore the complexity of the concept of the victim within the context of organ trading. By examining the intricate phenomenon of organ trade, we show how prevailing notions of victimhood form the basis of concrete social practices. The empirical basis for this exploration comprises in-depth interviews conducted during fieldwork in South Africa and Kosovo. We also draw on research undertaken at various expert meetings. What our research in these locations attests to is that one-dimensional and generalised conceptualisations of victimhood are rife, and that these tend to be founded on a pre-theorised opposition between agency and victimhood. For persons who become practically and intimately involved in dealing with cases of organ trade – such as investigators and prosecutors – such conceptualisations do not hold. What is required is an understanding of victimhood that takes into account its complexity. In this paper, we explore attempts to grasp and reduce this complexity, and argue against generalised concepts of victimhood and for concepts that are sensitive to contextual and relational variations.

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  • 3.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Corporeal Anachronisms: Notes on Affect, Relationality, and Power in Steampunk2013In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 369-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Steampunk is an aesthetic technological movement incorporating science fiction, art, engineering, and a vibrant 21st century Do-It-Yourself counterculture. This article explores the feminist potentials of ‘thinking with’ steampunk as a playful, affective and decidedly political response to the present technological condition. It starts out by navigating the field of affect theory with a Deleuzian reading of Baruch Spinoza on affect, to then engage in the affective renderings of the relations, rhythms, and power of a soma-technology central to steampunks as well as their Victorian predecessors: the corset. The purpose of the article is (at least) threefold: first, it sets out to complicate the notion of the corset as either oppressive or liberating by a move from signification to affect. Secondly, it aims to put a feminist spin on Spinoza, by offering what Moira Gatens (2000) calls a micropolitical feminism of the in-betweens of subjects (or bodies). The argument, thus, takes seriously the seeming lack of distinction in Spinoza between nature and artifice, which opens up possibilities of exploring the affective relations and the in-betweens of human and nonhuman bodies. Finally, and as a result of this interest in the affective relationality of human and nonhuman bodies, the article contributes to the discussion of ‘somatechnics’ (Sullivan and Murray 2009) by proposing an intimate relationship between somatechnics and affect.

  • 4.
    Sundén, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Gender Studies.
    Temporalities of Transition: Trans- temporal Femininity in a Human Musical Automaton2015In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 197-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes as its point of departure the social media presence of a human musical automaton called Rabbit. As part of the US-based band Steam Powered Giraffe, Rabbit is performed by Bunny Bennett, who recently came out as a transgender woman. As a result of this shift, Rabbit is being transformed from a male automaton into a transgender female robot. The news of the transformation hit like a bomb in the emotionally invested fan base. The story of the transitioning robot is an intimate coming together of technologies, imagination, and transgender embodiment. It is a story that deserves scholarly attention for two reasons: This case offers ways of re-casting the discussion in transgender studies within a post-humanist framework of somatechnics. Secondly, it is a case which foregrounds an understanding of gender as a question of time. In focusing on transition as a continuous, open-ended process, gender is primarily understood as a temporal form which cuts or vibrates through the body in highly material, embodied ways. The domain of queer temporality is rather densely theorised, but what about trans- temporality? If queer temporality first and foremost deals with sexuality and time, what would it mean to shift the focus to gender? Drawing on Gilles Deleuze on time, this article is a contribution to the field of transgender studies on the question of trans- temporality in a technological vein.

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