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  • 1.
    Appelgren, Ester
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Book review: News, numbers, and public opinion in a data-driven world: by An Nguyen New York, Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 304 pp., £86.40 (hardback.), ISBN: 9781501330353, £26.09 (paperback), ISBN: 97815013540072019In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 1303-1305Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Appelgren, Ester
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    The No-Go Zone of Journalism Studies: Revisiting the Concept of Technological Determinism2023In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 672-690Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to assess technological determinism in relation tointerdisciplinarity in journalism studies. Based on a scoping reviewof articles published during the last decade in three influentialscientific journals within the journalism studies field, DigitalJournalism, New Media & Society and Journalism, the study analyzesmanifestations of technological determinism and interdisciplinarity.The review includes in its analysis 127 articles published between2012 and 2022 that mention “technological determinism” and “journalism.” Furthermore, the study connects these manifestations tothe biographies of the authors in terms of their PhD dissertationdiscipline. The study raises two concerns. First, the analysis of themanifestation of technological determinism indicates that technological determinism is mainly thought of and discussed by thescholarly community from a functionalist viewpoint. It seems likescholarship that has added nuances and further developed thetheory has been disregarded or perhaps is not even known.Second, interdisciplinary research on technology becomes difficultsince the essence of technological determinism is considered ano-go zone in journalism studies. However, for the field of journalism studies to grow even stronger a revised delimitation isnecessary. To reduce the stigma around technological determinismas a concept, the limitation should not exclude the use of theconcept, but encourage a more nuanced assessment of it to contribute to the discussion of the role of technology in journalism.

  • 3.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Engaging Citizens for Climate Change: Challenges for Journalism2021In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, no 6, p. 755-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How issues are framed in journalism in terms of problems, solutions, and levels of responsibility is of great importance in order to engage and lead toward individual and collective action. Data journalism has been acknowledged as a practice that often features a high level of interactivity, with the potential to engage the public. In this study, we investigate the content and production of climate change reporting in Swedish public service data journalism and discuss how frames are used in this alternative form of moderated science communication. Our results indicate an unconventional merger between science communication and data journalistic practices where motivational framing is used only to some extent as a way to increase public engagement with climate change. We also found that producers focus on educating and raising awareness rather than engaging the public and that they are guided by the ideal of objectivity.

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  • 4.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Lindén, Carl-Gustav
    Helsingfors Universitet.
    van Dalen, Arjen
    University of Southern Denmark .
    Data Journalism Research: Studying a Maturing Field across Journalistic Cultures, Media Markets and Political Environments2019In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 1191-1199Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although data journalism is practiced globally, data journalism research has traditionally focused on a limited set of countries, primarily within the liberal and democratic corporatist media systems. Many recently published studies illustrate a growing scholarly interest in data journalism in other parts of the world, but these studies are still limited in number. This special issue brings together five new empirical studies of data journalism around the world, as well as two commentaries and two book reviews on the topic with the aim of broadening the theoretical, empirical, and geographic perspectives on data journalism. The core of the special issue consists of five national and comparative case studies studying data journalism in Africa, the Arab world, Italy, the UK, and Argentina. Combined, these articles and the other publications in this special issue point to three important contextual factors that shape data journalism worldwide: journalistic cultures, media markets, and the political environment. After a discussion of each of these three factors, areas for future research are proposed.

  • 5.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Data Journalism In Sweden: Introducing new methods and genres of journalism into “old” organizations2014In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 394-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data journalism is an evolving form of investigative journalism. In previous research andhandbooks published on this topic, this form of journalism has been called computer-assistedreporting and data-driven journalism, as well as precision, computational or database journalism.In Sweden, data journalism is still fairly uncommon. The purpose of this paper is to providean overview of the development of data journalism at seven Swedish traditional mediacompanies, using action research methods. The content of this paper is based on an onlinesurvey of journalists and in-depth interviews with editors at these participating companies. Theresults indicate that, based on how this field is currently perceived by journalists in the interviews,there is a common definition of data journalism. Furthermore, the survey shows thatthe attitudes towards data journalism during the process of introducing new methods andgenres of journalism into “old” organizations are correlated with the level of perceived experiencein data journalism working methods. The main challenges facing the working methodsof data journalism today are a shortage of time and the need for training and developingdata journalism skills.

  • 6.
    Bengtsson, Stina
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Relevance of Digital News: Themes, Scales and Temporalities2023In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In news research, news relevance was for long synonymous with how journalists constructed it. But recently, scholars have questioned the assumption that journalists’ preferences correspond with their audiences’. Several studies have approached news relevance from the audience point of view, showing audiences’ news relevance is constructed as an everyday practice, through assessments of topics and brands, and at the backdrop of users’ earlier experiences. News relevance from the audience perspective however still remains undertheorized and builds on traditional understandings of news journalism. This article aims to contribute to this debate with (1) a matrix of four types of news relevance, constructed from an analysis of how young Swedish adults construct news relevance in the contemporary digital media landscape, (2) the identification of three dimensions that distinguish different kinds of news relevance from each other, and (3) a theoretical definition of news relevance from the audience’s perspective grounded in phenomenological theory and empirical analysis. This papers hence provides a deeper theoretical and empirical understanding of the ways news, understood as something broader than news journalism, is considered relevant by young audiences.

  • 7.
    Morini, Francesca
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies. UCLab, Fachhochschule Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany.
    Dörk, Marian
    UCLab, Fachhochschule Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany.
    Appelgren, Ester
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Sensing What’s New: Considering Ethics When Using Sensor Data in Journalistic Practices2023In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 465-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As data are becoming increasingly central to journalistic practice, a number of technology-driven approaches are emerging among data journalists. This article focuses on sensor journalism, which brings new practical and ethical concerns to journalism. By interviewing and working with data journalists and journalism scholars, we analyze the new technological and ethical challenges that sensors bring to journalism. The results contribute to the knowledge on how data journalists implicitly embed ethical values into their everyday work. Furthermore, they suggest that general ethical values are revisited and extended by the influence of sensors.

  • 8.
    Tenor, Carina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Hyperlocal News And Media Accountability2018In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 1064-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how hyperlocal entrepreneurs interpret and undertake the role of accountable journalism, but it still acknowledges the many roles hyperlocal news may hold in a local community. The analysis is built on the approaches within this group toward (1) business and (2) journalism. The findings suggest that the focus of (A) nonprofit/nonprofessional could be to mirror community events, often as a “positive” counter-image. Within (B) nonprofit/professional, interrogative reporting could be viewed as a contribution to the common good. Niches of news alerts and partnership content are found within (C) for-profit/nonprofessional, while a full news standard is the (struggling) ambition within (D) for-profit/professional. The argument can be made that a deeper understanding of how media accountability can be addressed and/or promoted in this diverse sector of scarce resources is a vital question for policymakers, educational institutions and the public–as well as for the future of local journalism.

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  • 9.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Tracing online news in motion: Time and duration in the study of liquid journalism2016In: Digital Journalism, ISSN 2167-0811, E-ISSN 2167-082X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 24-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the latest decade, news production practices have undergone dramatic changes as a consequence of journalism’s migration from offline to online platforms. While the linear news models of the past were characterized by delivery of static texts within strict deadlines, contemporary non-linear production practices are characterized by flexibility and constant delivery of “liquid” news. This article presents a method specifically designed for the study of constantly evolving news flows online. Methodologically, the approach entails new opportuni- ties to systematically scrutinize the online news process, using time, duration and positioning of published materials as central variables. Based on an illustrative analysis of the online news flow of the Swedish Public Service Radio, the article gives examples of how such analyses can provide new knowledge about the processes of digital news production. 

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