sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Asghar, Naveed
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology. Örebro universitet.
    Lee, Yi-Ping
    Umeå universitet.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Umeå universitet.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    Umeå universitet.
    Melik, Wessam
    Örebro universitet.
    Kröger, Andrea
    6Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany / University of Magdeburg, Magdenbrug, Germany.
    Överby, Anna K.
    Umeå universitet.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Örebro universitet.
    The role of the poly(A) tract in the replication and virulence of tick-borne encephalitis virus2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, no 6, article id 39265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a flavivirus transmitted to humans, usually via tick bites. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in humans, and symptoms range from mild flu-like symptoms to severe and long-lasting sequelae, including permanent brain damage. It has been suggested that within the population of viruses transmitted to the mammalian host, quasispecies with neurotropic properties might become dominant in the host resulting in neurological symptoms. We previously demonstrated the existence of TBEV variants with variable poly(A) tracts within a single blood-fed tick. To characterize the role of the poly(A) tract in TBEV replication and virulence, we generated infectious clones of Torö-2003 with the wild-type (A)3C(A)6 sequence (Torö-6A) or with a modified (A)3C(A)38 sequence (Torö-38A). Torö-38A replicated poorly compared to Torö-6A in cell culture, but Torö-38A was more virulent than Torö-6A in a mouse model of TBE. Next-generation sequencing of TBEV genomes after passaging in cell culture and/or mouse brain revealed mutations in specific genomic regions and the presence of quasispecies that might contribute to the observed differences in virulence. These data suggest a role for quasispecies development within the poly(A) tract as a virulence determinant for TBEV in mice.

  • 2.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dekhla, Isabelle
    University of Gothenburg.
    Schöld, Sofie
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andersson, Mathias H.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Mathematics Teaching. University of Gothenburg.
    Amorim, M Clara P
    ISPA-Instituto Universitário, Lisboa, Portugal / Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Continuous but not intermittent noise has a negative impact on mating success in a marine fish with paternal care2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 5494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic underwater noise is a global pollutant of increasing concern but its impact on reproduction in fish is largely unknown. Hence, a better understanding of its consequences for this important link to fitness is crucial. Working in aquaria, we experimentally tested the impact of broadband noise exposure (added either continuously or intermittently), compared to a control, on the behaviour and reproductive success of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps), a vocal fish with exclusive paternal care. Compared to the intermittent noise and control treatments, the continuous noise treatment increased latency to female nest inspection and spawning and decreased spawning probability. In contrast, many other female and male pre-spawning behaviours, and female ventilation rate (proxies for stress levels) did not differ among treatments. Therefore, it is likely that female spawning decisions were delayed by a reduced ability to assess male acoustic signals, rather than due to stress per se and that the silent periods in the intermittent noise treatment provided a respite where the females could assess the males. Taken together, we show that noise (of similar frequency range as anthropogenic boat noise) negatively affects reproductive success, particularly under a continuous noise exposure.

  • 3.
    Lee, Y.
    et al.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Matsushima, N.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Yada, S.
    KTH.
    Nita, S.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Kodama, T.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Amberg, Gustav
    Södertörn University. KTH.
    Shiomi, J.
    University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
    Revealing How Topography of Surface Microstructures Alters Capillary Spreading2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 7787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetting phenomena, i.e. the spreading of a liquid over a dry solid surface, are important for understanding how plants and insects imbibe water and moisture and for miniaturization in chemistry and biotechnology, among other examples. They pose fundamental challenges and possibilities, especially in dynamic situations. The surface chemistry and micro-scale roughness may determine the macroscopic spreading flow. The question here is how dynamic wetting depends on the topography of the substrate, i.e. the actual geometry of the roughness elements. To this end, we have formulated a toy model that accounts for the roughness shape, which is tested against a series of spreading experiments made on asymmetric sawtooth surface structures. The spreading speed in different directions relative to the surface pattern is found to be well described by the toy model. The toy model also shows the mechanism by which the shape of the roughness together with the line friction determines the observed slowing down of the spreading.

  • 4.
    Shen, Biao
    et al.
    Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Yamada, Masayuki
    Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Hidaka, Sumitomo
    Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Liu, Jiewei
    KTH.
    Shiomi, Junichiro
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH.
    Kohno, Masamichi
    Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Takahashi, Koji
    Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Takata, Yasuyuki
    Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Early Onset of Nucleate Boiling on Gas-covered Biphilic Surfaces2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 2036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For phase-change cooling schemes for electronics, quick activation of nucleate boiling helps safeguard the electronics components from thermal shocks associated with undesired surface superheating at boiling incipience, which is of great importance to the long-term system stability and reliability. Previous experimental studies show that bubble nucleation can occur surprisingly early on mixed-wettability surfaces. In this paper, we report unambiguous evidence that such unusual bubble generation at extremely low temperatures-even below the boiling point-is induced by a significant presence of incondensable gas retained by the hydrophobic surface, which exhibits exceptional stability even surviving extensive boiling deaeration. By means of high-speed imaging, it is revealed that the consequently gassy boiling leads to unique bubble behaviour that stands in sharp contrast with that of pure vapour bubbles. Such findings agree qualitatively well with numerical simulations based on a diffuse-interface method. Moreover, the simulations further demonstrate strong thermocapillary flows accompanying growing bubbles with considerable gas contents, which is associated with heat transfer enhancement on the biphilic surface in the low-superheat region.

  • 5.
    Stickley, Andrew
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    DeVylder, Jordan E
    Fordham University, New York City, NY, USA.
    Inoue, Yosuke
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Universitat de Barcelon, Barcelona, Spain / ICREA, Barcelona, Spain.
    Sleep problems and depression among 237 023 community-dwelling adults in 46 low- and middle-income countries2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 12011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep problems are considered a core symptom of depression. However, there is little information about the comorbidity of sleep problems and depression in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and whether sleep problems with depression confer additional risk for decrements in health compared to sleep problems alone. This study thus examined the association between sleep problems and depression and whether sleep problems with depression are associated with an increased risk for poorer health in 46 LMICs. Cross-sectional, community-based data from 237 023 adults aged ≥18 years from the World Health Survey (WHS) 2002-2004 were analyzed. Information on sleep problems (severe/extreme) and International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision depression/depression subtypes was collected. Multivariable logistic (binary and multinomial) and linear regression analyses were performed. Sleep problems were associated with subsyndromal depression (odds ratio [OR]: 2.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.84-2.70), brief depressive episode (OR = 2.48, 95% CI = 2.09-2.95) and depressive episode (OR = 3.61, 95% CI = 3.24-4.03). Sleep problems with depression (vs. sleep problems alone) conferred additional risk for anxiety, perceived stress and decrements in health in the domains of mobility, self-care, pain, cognition, and interpersonal activities. Clinicians should be aware that the co-occurrence of sleep problems and depression is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes in LMICs. Detecting this co-occurrence may be important for treatment planning.

  • 6. Wang, Jiayu
    et al.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH.
    Cannon, James J.
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Yue, Feng
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Suzuki, Yuji
    University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH.
    Shiomi, Junichiro
    KTH.
    Surface structure determines dynamic wetting2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 8474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf