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  • 1.
    Olsén, K Håkan
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Petersson, Erik
    Ragnarsson, Bjarne
    Lundqvist, Hans
    Järvi, Torbjörn
    Downstream migration in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolt sibling groups2004In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 328-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown kin recognition abilities in salmonid fish. Some authors have suggested that the attraction of juvenile fish to siblings may indicate preference for shoaling with kin. The aim of the present study is to test the prerequisite for the hypothesis that siblings swim spatially closer than unrelated fish during their seaward migration as smolts. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) eggs from three families were each reared in two tanks to create familiar and unfamiliar sibling smolts. Before the experiment started they were tagged individually withpassive integrated transponders (PITs). Twelve individuals from each of six groups were mixed and released together at several occasions in the upper end of the 400-m-long experimental stream. An automatic PIT-monitoring system placed in the outlet recorded the time for passage of each individual leaving the stream. Eighty-five percent of the juveniles monitored by the PIT antenna showed downstream migration at night hours and they migrated significantly more often closer in time to both known and unknown siblings than to unrelated fish. The results suggest that there is a genetic component in the migratory behaviour of Atlantic salmon smolts and support the hypothesis that smolts migrate in kin-structured groups.

  • 2. Palm, Stefan
    et al.
    Dannewitz, Johan
    Järvi, Torbjörn
    Koljonen, Marja-Liisa
    Prestegaard, Tore
    Olsén, K Håkan
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    No indications of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) shoaling with kin in the Baltic Sea2008In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 65, no 8, p. 1738-1748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have shown that fish shoals may consist of closely related individuals. It has been found. for example, that released out-migrating salmon smolts tend to aggregate with kin. including when sibling groups have been reared separately. We used genetic microsatellite markers to test whether "shoals" of adult Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) during the marine phase (i.e., aggregations of fish Caught in drift nets at offshore feeding areas in the Baltic Sea) consisted of closely related individuals (full-siblings, half-siblings). We found no evidence of kin cohesiveness related to shoals, however. Despite a weak overall tendency for individuals assigned to the same population (river or stock) to Occur tooether, estimates of genetic relatedness in combination with consistent heterozygote deficiencies. and results from mixed-stock analyses and assignment tests collectively indicated that shoals consisted of unrelated fish from multiple populations.

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