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  • 1.
    Baars, Adája E
    et al.
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rubio-Valverde, Jose R
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hu, Yannan
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bopp, Matthias
    University of Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kalediene, Ramune
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Martikainen, Pekka
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Regidor, Enrique
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Madrid, Spain.
    White, Chris
    Office for National Statistics, London, United Kingdom.
    Wojtyniak, Bogdan
    National Institute of Public Health, Warsaw, Poland.
    Mackenbach, Johan P
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Nusselder, Wilma J
    Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Fruit and vegetable consumption and its contribution to inequalities in life expectancy and disability-free life expectancy in ten European countries2019Inngår i: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 64, nr 6, s. 861-872Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To assess to what extent educational differences in total life expectancy (TLE) and disability-free life expectancy (DFLE) could be reduced by improving fruit and vegetable consumption in ten European countries.

    METHODS: Data from national census or registries with mortality follow-up, EU-SILC, and ESS were used in two scenarios to calculate the impact: the upward levelling scenario (exposure in low educated equals exposure in high educated) and the elimination scenario (no exposure in both groups). Results are estimated for men and women between ages 35 and 79 years.

    RESULTS: Varying by country, upward levelling reduced inequalities in DFLE by 0.1-1.1 years (1-10%) in males, and by 0.0-1.3 years (0-18%) in females. Eliminating exposure reduced inequalities in DFLE between 0.6 and 1.7 years for males (6-15%), and between 0.1 years and 1.8 years for females (3-20%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Upward levelling of fruit and vegetable consumption would have a small, positive effect on both TLE and DFLE, and could potentially reduce inequalities in TLE and DFLE.

  • 2. Kislitsyna, Olga
    et al.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Gilmore, Anna
    McKee, Martin
    The social determinants of adolescent smoking in Russia in 20042010Inngår i: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 55, nr 6, s. 619-626Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the prevalence of adolescent smoking in the Russian ederation and examine what factors are associated with it. ata were drawn from Round 13 of the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring urvey (RLMS) carried out in 2004. The sample consists of 815 dolescents (430 boys, 385 girls) aged 14-17 years who answered uestions about their health behaviours. moking was more prevalent among boys than girls (26.1 vs. 5.7%). aternal smoking and adolescent alcohol use were associated with smoking mong both sexes. The self-assessment of one's socioeconomic position as nfavourable was associated with girls' smoking, while living in a isrupted family, physical inactivity and having a low level of elf-esteem were predictive of boys' smoking. he family environment appears to be an important determinant of dolescent smoking in Russia. In particular, boys and girls may be odelling the negative health behaviour lifestyles of their parents, ith unhealthy behaviours clustering. Efforts to reduce adolescent moking in Russia must address the negative effects emanating from the arental home whilst also addressing associated behaviours such as lcohol use.

  • 3. Murphy, Adrianna
    et al.
    Levchuk, Nataliia
    Stickley, Andrew
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Roberts, Bayard
    McKee, Martin
    A country divided?: Regional variation in mortality in Ukraine2013Inngår i: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 58, nr 6, s. 837-844Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We set out to identify the contribution of various causes of death to regional differences in life expectancy in Ukraine. Mortality data by oblast (province) were obtained from the State Statistical Committee of Ukraine. The contribution of various causes of death to differences in life expectancy between East, West and South Ukraine was estimated using decomposition. In 2008, life expectancy for men in South (61.8 years) and East Ukraine (61.2 years) was lower than for men in West Ukraine (64.0 years). A similar pattern was observed among women. This was mostly due to deaths from infectious disease and external causes among young adults, and cardio- and cerebro-vascular deaths among older adults. Deaths from TB among young adults contribute most to differences in life expectancy. Deaths due to infectious disease, especially TB, play an important role in the gap in life expectancy between regions in Ukraine. These deaths are entirely preventable-further research is needed to identify what has 'protected' individuals in Western Ukraine from the burden of deaths experienced by their Southern and Eastern counterparts.

  • 4.
    Reile, R
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). The National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Differentiating positive and negative self-rated health: results from a cross-sectional study in Estonia2013Inngår i: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 58, nr 4, s. 555-564Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Vandenheede, H.
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium / Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Deboosere, P.
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Espelt, A.
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bopp, M.
    University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland .
    Borrell, C.
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Costa, G.
    University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Eikemo, T. A.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway .
    Gnavi, R.
    University of Turin, Turin, Italy / Local Health Agency of Collegno and Pinerolo, Turin, Italy .
    Hoffmann, R.
    Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Kulhanova, I.
    Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands .
    Kulik, M.
    Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands / University of California, San Francisco, USA .
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi. Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Martikainen, P.
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Menvielle, G.
    French National Institute of Health and Medical Research,, Paris, France / Sorbonne University, Paris, France .
    Rodriguez-Sanz, M.
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rychtarikova, J.
    Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic .
    Mackenbach, J. P.
    Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Educational inequalities in diabetes mortality across Europe in the 2000s: the interaction with gender2015Inngår i: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 60, nr 4, s. 401-410Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate educational inequalities in diabetes mortality in Europe in the 2000s, and to assess whether these inequalities differ between genders. Methods: Data were obtained from mortality registries covering 14 European countries. To determine educational inequalities in diabetes mortality, age-standardised mortality rates, mortality rate ratios, and slope and relative indices of inequality were calculated. To assess whether the association between education and diabetes mortality differs between genders, diabetes mortality was regressed on gender, educational rank and ‘gender × educational rank’. Results: An inverse association between education and diabetes mortality exists in both genders across Europe. Absolute educational inequalities are generally larger among men than women; relative inequalities are generally more pronounced among women, the relative index of inequality being 2.8 (95 % CI 2.0–3.9) in men versus 4.8 (95 % CI 3.2–7.2) in women. Gender inequalities in diabetes mortality are more marked in the highest than the lowest educated. Conclusions: Education and diabetes mortality are inversely related in Europe in the 2000s. This association differs by gender, indicating the need to take the socioeconomic and gender dimension into account when developing public health policies. © 2015 The Author(s)

  • 6.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). CHESS, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation .
    Ferlander, Sara
    Södertörns högskola, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskaper, Sociologi.
    Migranova, Ludmila
    Carlson, Per
    Mid Sweden University.
    Rimachevskaya, Natalia
    Moscow Health Survey 2004: social surveying under difficult circumstances2008Inngår i: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 53, nr 4, s. 171-179Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this paper is to present the Moscow Health Survey 2004, which was designed to examine health inequalities in Moscow. In particular we want to discuss social survey problems, such as non-response, in Moscow and Russia. Methods: Interviews, covering social and economic circumstances, health and social trust, of a stratified random sample of the greater Moscow population, aged 18+. Reasons for nonresponse were noted down with great care. Odds ratios (ORs) for self-rated health by gender and by six social dimensions were estimated separately for districts with low and high response rates. Bias due to non-response is discussed. Results and conclusions: About one in two (53.1 %) of approached individuals could not be interviewed, resulting in 1190 completed interviews. Non-response in most Russian surveys, but perhaps particularly in Moscow, is large, partly due to fear of strangers and distrust of authorities. ORs for poor health vary significantly by gender, occupational class, education and economic hardship. We find no significant differences in these ORs when comparing districts with low and high response rates. Non-response may be a problem when estimating prevalence rates or population means, but much less so when estimating odds ratios in multivariate analyses.

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