sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Porseryd, Tove
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Volkova, Kristina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology. Örebro universitet.
    Reyhanian Caspillo, Nasim
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology. Örebro univesitet.
    Källman, Thomas
    Uppsala universitet.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Porsch Hällström, Inger
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Persistent Effects of Developmental Exposure to 17α-Ethinylestradiol on the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Brain Transcriptome and Behavior2017In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5153, E-ISSN 1662-5153, Vol. 11, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is an endocrine disrupting compound of concern due to its persistence and widespread presence in the aquatic environment. Effects of developmental exposure to low concentrations of EE2 in fish on reproduction and behavior not only persisted to adulthood, but have also been observed to be transmitted to several generations of unexposed progeny. To investigate the possible biological mechanisms of the persistent anxiogenic phenotype, we exposed zebrafish embryos for 80 days post fertilization to 0, 3 and 10 ng/L EE2 (measured concentrations 2.14 and 7.34 ng/L). After discontinued exposure, the animals were allowed to recover for 120 days in clean water. Adult males and females were later tested for changes in stress response and shoal cohesion, and whole-brain gene expression was analyzed with RNA sequencing. The results show increased anxiety in the novel tank and scototaxis tests, and increased shoal cohesion in fish exposed during development to EE2. RNA sequencing revealed 34 coding genes differentially expressed in male brains and 62 in female brains as a result of EE2 exposure. Several differences were observed between males and females in differential gene expression, with only one gene, sv2b, coding for a synaptic vesicle protein, that was affected by EE2 in both sexes. Functional analyses showed that in female brains, EE2 had significant effects on pathways connected to the circadian rhythm, cytoskeleton and motor proteins and synaptic proteins. A large number of non-coding sequences including 19 novel miRNAs were also differentially expressed in the female brain. The largest treatment effect in male brains was observed in pathways related to cholesterol biosynthesis and synaptic proteins. Circadian rhythm and cholesterol biosynthesis, previously implicated in anxiety behavior, might represent possible candidate pathways connecting the transcriptome changes to the alterations to behavior. Further the observed alteration in expression of genes involved in synaptogenesis and synaptic function may be important for the developmental modulations resulting in an anxiety phenotype. This study represents an initial survey of the fish brain transcriptome by RNA sequencing after long-term recovery from developmental exposure to an estrogenic compound.

  • 2.
    Rukavishnikov, Grigory
    et al.
    Bekhterev National Medical Research Center for Psychiatry and Neurology, Russia.
    Leonova, Lubov
    Bekhterev National Medical Research Center for Psychiatry and Neurology, Russia.
    Kasyanov, Evgeny
    Bekhterev National Medical Research Center for Psychiatry and Neurology, Russia.
    Leonov, Vadim
    Södertörn University.
    Neznanov, Nikholay
    Bekhterev National Medical Research Center for Psychiatry and Neurology, Russia; Pavlov First Saint-Petersburg State Medical University, Russia.
    Mazo, Galina
    Bekhterev National Medical Research Center for Psychiatry and Neurology, Russia.
    Antimicrobial activity of antidepressants on normal gut microbiota: Results of the in vitro study2023In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, E-ISSN 1662-5153, Vol. 17, article id 1132127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, there is little published data on the effects of antidepressants on normal gut microbiota and the consequences of such effects on treatment outcomes. The aim of the study: was to evaluate the growth kinetics of normal human gut microorganisms with antidepressants most common in routine clinical practice. Materials and methods: Research objects were species of microorganisms representing normal gut microbiota: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Candida albicans ATCC 24433, Bifidobacterium 791, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103. All microorganisms were cultivated in Schaedler broth (HiMedia) under aerobic/anaerobic conditions. The active substances of all studied antidepressants (fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, duloxetine, venlafaxine, mirtazapine) were extracted from ground preparations by dimethyl sulfoxide and centrifuged. Each solution of antidepressants was added to a Schaedler broth containing a certain microorganism's strain and diluted to final concentrations-200 μg/ml, 500 μg/ml, and 700 μg/ml. For a quantitative assessment of the effect, the specific growth rates (μ, h-1) of microorganisms were calculated as the slope of the initial part of the growth curve in coordinates (lnA, t). To evaluate the antidepressant effects on representatives of the normal microbiota in vitro, the following parameters were chosen: specific growth rate and IC50. Results: All antidepressants had an inhibitory effect on the growth of all studied microorganisms. Fluvoxamine and venlafaxine had the least effect on the growth activity of all studied microorganisms. Fluoxetine showed a pronounced effect on growth activity against E. coli, E. feacalis, S. aureus, and the least effect against C. albicans. Escitalopram had a greater effect on the growth rate of E. coli, E. feacalis, B. bifidum, L. rhamnosus, and C. albicans, which puts it among the leaders in terms of its effect on the growth activity of the microorganisms we studied. Mirtazapine, according to the results of our experiment, showed the greatest activity against L. rhamnosus and C. albicans. Conclusions: Our results confirm the effects of antidepressants on the growth activity of the normal gut microbiota individual strains. Further study of the antimicrobial activity of antidepressants may become one of the new directions for optimizing the personalized therapy of patients with depression.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf