sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Appelgren, Henrik
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Karolinska Institute.
    Kniola, Barbara
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Karolinska Institute.
    Ekwall, Karl
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Karolinska Institute.
    Distinct centromere domain structures with separate functions demonstrated in live fission yeast cells2003In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 116, no 19, p. 4035-4042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fission yeast (Saccharomyces pombe) centromere DNA is organized in a central core region flanked on either side by a region of outer repeat (otr) sequences. The otr region is known to be heterochromatic and bound by the Swi6 protein whereas the central core region contains an unusual chromatin structure involving the histone H3 variant Cnp1 (S. pombe CENP-A). The central core is the base for formation of the kinetochore structure whereas the flanking region is important for sister centromere cohesion. We have previously shown that the ultrastructural domain structure of S. pombe centromeres in interphase is similar to that of human centromeres. Here we demonstrate that S. pombe centromeres are organized in cytologically distinct domains even in mitosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of fixed metaphase cells revealed that the otr regions of the centromere were still held together by cohesion even after the sister kinetochores had separated. In live cells, the central cores and kinetochores of sister chromosomes could be distinguished from one Another when they were subjected to mitotic tension. The function of the different centromeric domains was addressed. Transacting mutations affecting the kinetochore (nuf2) central core domain (mis6) and the heterochromatin domain (rik1) were analyzed in live cells. In interphase, both nuf2 and mis6 caused declustering of centromeres from the spindle pole body whereas centromere clustering was normal in rik1 despite an apparent decondensation defect. The declustering of centromeres in mis6 cells correlated with loss the Ndc80 kinetochore marker protein from the centromeres. Interestingly the declustered centromeres were still restricted to the nuclear periphery thus revealing a kinetochore-independent peripheral localization mechanism for heterochromatin. Time-lapse microscopy of live mis6 and nuf2-1 mutant cells in mitosis showed similar severe misaggregation phenotypes whereas the rik1 mutants showed a mild cohesion defect. Thus, S. pombe centromeres have two distinguishable domains even during mitosis, and our functional analyses support the previous observations that the kinetochore/central core and the heterochromatin domains have distinct functions both in interphase and mitosis.

  • 2.
    Arabi, Azadeh
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Karolinska Institute.
    Rustum, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Stockholm University.
    Hallberg, Einar
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Wright, Anthony P H
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Karolinska Institute.
    Accumulation of c-Myc and proteasomes at the nucleoli of cells containing elevated c-Myc protein levels2003In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 116, no 9, p. 1707-1717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    c-Myc is a predominately nuclear transcription factor that is a substrate for rapid turnover by the proteasome system. Cancer-related mutations in c-Myc lead to defects in its degradation and thereby contribute to the increase in its cellular level that is associated with the disease. Little is known about the mechanisms that target c-Myc to the proteasomes. By using a GFP fusion protein and live analysis we show that c-Myc shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and thus it could be degraded in either compartment. Strikingly, at elevated levels of expression c-Myc accumulates at nucleoli in some cells, consistent with saturation of a nucleolus-associated degradation system in these cells. This idea is further supported by the observation that proteasome inhibitor treatment causes accumulation of c-Myc at the nucleoli of essentially all cells. Under these conditions c-Myc is relatively stably associated with the nucleolus, as would be expected if the nucleolus functions as a sequestration/degradation site for excess c-Myc. Furthermore, during elevated c-Myc expression or proteasome inhibition, nucleoli that are associated with c-Myc also accumulate proteasomes. c-Myc and proteasomes co-localise in intranucleolar regions distinct from the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus. Based on these results we propose a model for c-Myc downregulation where c-Myc is sequestered at the nucleoli. Sequestration of c-Myc is accompanied by recruitment of proteasomes and may lead to subsequent degradation.

  • 3.
    Buch, Charlotta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lindberg, Robert
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Figueroa, Ricardo
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Gudise, Santhosh
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Onischenko, Evgeny
    Hallberg, Einar
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    An integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane localizes to the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells2009In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 122, no 12, p. 2100-2107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we characterize a transmembrane protein of the nuclear envelope that we name spindle-associated membrane protein 1 (Samp1). The protein is conserved in metazoa and fission yeast and is homologous to Net5 in rat and Ima1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that, in human cells, the protein is a membrane-spanning polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa. This is consistent with a predicted polypeptide of 392 amino acids that has five transmembrane segments and its C-terminus exposed to the nucleoplasm. During interphase, Samp1 was specifically distributed in the inner nuclear membrane. Post-transcriptional silencing of Samp1 expression resulted in separation of centrosomes from the nuclear envelope, indicating that it is functionally connected to the cytoskeleton. At the onset of mitosis, most of the protein dispersed out into the ER, as expected. However, during mitosis, a significant fraction of the protein specifically localized to the polar regions of the mitotic spindle. We demonstrate for the first time, in human cells, the existence of a membranous structure overlapping with the mitotic spindle. Interestingly, another integral inner nuclear membrane protein, emerin, was absent from the spindle-associated membranes. Thus, Samp1 defines a specific membrane domain associated with the mitotic spindle.

  • 4.
    Kihlmark, Madeleine
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Imreh, Gabriela
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Hallberg, Einar
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Sequential degradation of proteins from the nuclear envelope during apoptosis2001In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 114, no 20, p. 3643-3653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have produced new antibodies specific for the integral pore membrane protein POM121. Using these antibodies we show that during apoptosis POM121 becomes proteolytically degraded in a caspase-dependent manner. The POM121 antibodies and antibodies specific for other proteins of the nuclear envelope were used in a comparative study of nuclear apoptosis in staurosporine-treated buffalo rat liver cells. Nuclei from these cells were classified in three different stages of apoptotic progression: stage I, moderately condensed chromatin surrounded by a smooth nuclear periphery; stage II, compact patches of condensed chromatin collapsing against a smooth nuclear periphery; stage III, round compact chromatin bodies surrounded by grape-shaped nuclear periphery. We have performed double labeling immunofluorescence microscopy of individual apoptotic cells and quantitative immunoblotting analysis of total proteins from apoptotic cell cultures. The results showed that degradation of nuclear envelope marker proteins occurred in a specific order. POM121 degradation occurred surprisingly early and was initiated before nucleosomal DNA degradation could be detected using TUNEL assay and completed before clustering of the nuclear pores. POM121 was eliminated significantly more rapid compared with NUP153 (a peripheral protein located in the nucleoplasmic basket of the nuclear pore complex) and lamin B (a component of the nuclear lamina). Disappearance of NUP153 and lamin B was coincident with onset of DNA fragmentation and clustering of nuclear pores. By contrast, the peripheral NPC protein p62 was degraded much later. The results suggest that degradation of POM121 may be an important early step in propagation of nuclear apoptosis.

  • 5. Soop, T
    et al.
    Nashchekin, D
    Zhao, J
    Sun, X
    Alzhanova-Ericsson, Alla T
    Björkroth, B
    Ovchinnikov, L
    Daneholt, B
    A p50-like Y-box protein with a putative translational role becomes associated with pre-mRNA concomitant with transcription2003In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 116, no 8, p. 1493-1503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vertebrates free messenger ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles and polysomes contain an abundant Y-box protein called p50 (YB-1), which regulates translation, presumably by affecting the packaging of the RNA. Here, we have identified a p50-like protein in the dipteran Chironomus tentans and studied its relation with the biogenesis of mRNA in larval salivary glands. The salivary gland cells contain polytene chromosomes with the transcriptionally active regions blown up as puffs. A few giant puffs, called Balbiani rings (BRs), generate a transcription product, a large RNP particle, which can be visualised (with the electron microscope) during its assembly on the gene and during its transport to and through the nuclear pores. The p50-like protein studied, designated Ct-p40/50 (or p40/50 for short), was shown to contain a central cold-shock domain, an alanine- and proline-rich N-terminal domain, and a C-terminal domain with alternating acidic and basic regions, an organisation that is characteristic of p50 (YB-1). The p40/50 protein appears in two isoforms, p40 and p50, which contain 264 and 317 amino acids, respectively. The two isoforms share the first 258 amino acids and thus differ in amino-acid sequence only in the region close to the C-terminus. When a polyclonal antibody was raised against p40/50, western blot analysis and immunocytology showed that p40/50 is not only abundant in the cytoplasm but is also present in the nucleus. Immunolabelling of isolated polytene chromosomes showed that p40/50 appears in transcriptionally active regions, including the BRs. Using immunoelectron microscopy we revealed that p40/50 is added along the nascent transcripts and is also present in the released BR RNP particles in the nucleoplasm. Finally, by UV crosslinking in vivo we showed that p40/50 is bound to both nuclear and cytoplasmic poly(A) RNA. We conclude that p40/50 is being added cotranscriptionally along the growing BR pre-mRNA, is released with the processed mRNA into the nucleoplasm and probably remains associated with the mRNA both during nucleocytoplasmic transport and protein synthesis. Given that the p40/p50 protein, presumably with a role in translation, is loaded onto the primary transcript concomitant with transcription, an early programming of the cytoplasmic fate of mRNA is indicated.

  • 6. Winkelbauer, M E
    et al.
    Schafer, J C
    Haycraft, C J
    Swoboda, Peter
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Yoder, B K
    The C-elegans homologs of nephrocystin-1 and nephrocystin-4 are cilia transition zone proteins involved in chemosensory perception2005In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 118, no 23, p. 5575-5587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nephronophthisis (NPH) is a cystic kidney disorder that causes end-stage renal failure in children. Five nephrocystin (nephrocystin-1 to nephrocystin-5) genes, whose function is disrupted in NPH patients, have been identified and data indicate they form a complex at cell junctions and focal adhesions. More recently, the nephrocystin proteins have also been identified in cilia, as have multiple other cystic kidney disease related proteins. Significant insights into this cilia and cystic kidney disease connection have come from analyses in simpler eukaryotic organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. In this regard, we became interested in the C elegans homologs of nephrocystin-1 (nph-1) and nephrocystin-4 (nph-4) from a database screen to identify genes coordinately regulated by the ciliogenic transcription factor DAF-19. Here we show that expression of nph-1 and nph-4 is DAF-19 dependent, that their expression is restricted to ciliated sensory neurons, and that both NPH-1 and NPH-4 concentrate at the transition zones at the base of the cilia, but are not found in the cilium axoneme. In addition, NPH-4 is required for the localization of NPH-1 to this domain. Interestingly, nph-1 or nph-4 mutants have no obvious cilia assembly defects; however, they do have abnormalities in cilia-mediated sensory functions as evidenced by abnormal chemotaxis and lifespan regulation. Our data suggest that rather than having a ciliogenic role, the NPH proteins play an important function as part of the sensory or signaling machinery of this organelle. These findings suggest that the defects in human NPH patients may not be the result of aberrant ciliogenesis but abnormal cilia-sensory functions.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf