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  • 1.
    Bech, Emily Cochran
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Borevi, Karin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Mouritsen, Per
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    A ‘civic turn’ in Scandinavian family migration policies? Comparing Denmark, Norway and Sweden2017In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family migration policy, once basing citizens and resident foreigners’ possibilities to bring in foreign family members mainly on the right to family life, is increasingly a tool states use to limit immigration and to push newcomers to integrate into civic and economic life. The family migration policies of Denmark, Norway and Sweden range widely – from more minimal support and age requirements to high expectations of language skills, work records and even income levels. While in Denmark and increasingly in Norway growing sets of requirements have been justified on the need to protect the welfare state and a Nordic liberal way of life, in Sweden more minimal requirements have been introduced in the name of spurring immigrants’ labor market integration even as rights-based reasoning has continued to dominate. In all three countries, new restrictions have been introduced in the wake of the refugee crisis. These cases show how prioritizations of the right to family life vis-à-vis welfare-state sustainability have produced different rules for family entry, and how family migration policies are used to different extents to push civic integration of both new and already settled immigrants.

  • 2.
    Borevi, Karin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Mouritsen, Per
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    The civic turn of immigrant integration policies in the Scandinavian welfare states2017In: Comparative Migration Studies, ISSN 2214-8590, E-ISSN 2214-594X, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue addresses the question of how to understand the civic turn within immigrant integration in the West towards programs and instruments, public discourses and political intentions, which aim to condition, incentivize, and shape through socialization immigrants into ‘citizens’. Empirically, it focuses on the less studied Scandinavian cases of Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. In this introduction, we situate the contributions to this special issue within the overall debate on civic integration and convergence. We introduce the three cases, critically discuss the (liberal) convergence thesis and its descriptive and explanatory claims, and explain why studying the Scandinavian welfare states can further our understanding of the nature of the civic turn and its driving forces. Before concluding, we discuss whether civic integration policies actually work.

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CiteExportLink to result list
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
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  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf