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  • 1.
    Edlund, Anna
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. SLU.
    Hårdeman, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Jansson, Janet K.
    SLU / Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA.
    Sjöling, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment2008In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 2051-2063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179, -64 and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labelled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labelled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences, indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  • 2.
    Edlund, Anna
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. SLU.
    Soule, T
    Sjöling, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Jansson, J K
    Microbial community structure in polluted Baltic Sea sediments2006In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 223-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly half the seabed of the Baltic Proper is incapable of supporting life of higher organisms as a consequence of oxygen depletion resulting from eutrophication. However, these areas are actually teeming with microbial life. Here we used terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) to investigate the dominant archaeal and bacterial groups, with respect to community structure, in surface layers of bottom sediments of the Baltic Sea along a coastal pollution gradient. Both archaeal and bacterial communities formed distinct clusters along the pollution gradient and the community compositions were different at the polluted sites compared with the relatively clean reference sites. The structures of the bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to water depth, followed by organic carbon, oxygen, salinity and silicate levels. In contrast, the structures of the archaeal communities were most strongly correlated to oxygen, salinity, organic carbon, silicate and nitrate levels. Some members of the microbial communities were identified using a combination of traditional and molecular approaches. Isolates obtained on different culture media were identified by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA genes and some novel species were found. In addition, we developed a computer program, APLAUS, to elucidate the putative identities of the most dominant community members by T-RFLP.

  • 3.
    Elväng, Annelie M.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Westerberg, Karolina
    Stockholms universitet.
    Jernberg, Cecilia
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Karolinska Institutet.
    Jansson, Janet K
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Use of green fluorescent protein and luciferase biomarkers to monitor survival and activity of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 cells during degradation of 4-chlorophenol in soil2001In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recently isolated novel species Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 is capable of growth on and degradation of high concentrations of 4-chlorophenol (up to 350 mug ml(-1)) as the sole carbon and energy source, This strain shows promise for bioremediation of environmental sites contaminated with high levels of chlorophenols. In this study, green fluorescent protein (gfp) or luciferase (luc) genes were used as biomarkers for monitoring cell number and activity, respectively, during degradation of 4-chlorophenol by A. chlorophenolicus cells. The individual marked strains, Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6L (luc-tagged) and Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6G (gfp-tagged), were monitored during degradation of 250 mug ml(-1) 4-chlorophenol in pure culture and 175 mug g(-1) 4-chlorophenol in soil microcosms. Both gene-tagged strains were capable of cleaning up the contaminated soil during 9 d incubation. During the bioremediation experiments, the luc-tagged cells were monitored using luminometry and the gfp tagged cells using flow cytometry, in addition to selective plate counting for both strains. The cells remained at high population levels in the soil (evidenced by GFP-fluorescent cell counts) and the A. chlorophenolicus A6L population was metabolically active (evidenced by luciferase activity measurements). These results demonstrate that the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 inoculum is effective for cleaning-up soil containing high concentrations of 4-chlorophenol.

  • 4.
    Janson, Sven
    et al.
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Kalmar.
    Wouters, Johanna
    Department of Botany, Stockholm University.
    Bergman, Birgitta
    Department of Botany, Stockholm University.
    Carpenter, Edward J.
    Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook, NY.
    Host specificity in the Richelia - diatom symbiosis revealed by hetR gene sequence analysis1999In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 1, no 5, p. 431-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Richelia intracellularis forms associations with diatoms and is very abundant in tropical and subtropical seas. The genus Richelia contains only one species, R. intracellularis Schmidt, although it forms associations with several diatom genera and has considerable variation in size and morphology. The genetic diversity, and possible host specificity, within the genus Richelia is unknown. Using primers against hetR, a gene unique for filamentous cyanobacteria, specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were obtained from natural populations of R. intracellularis filaments associated with three diatom genera. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences showed that they were all in the same clade. This clade contained only the R. intracellularis sequences. The genetic affiliation of hetR sequences of R. intracellularis to those of other heterocystous cyanobacteria strongly suggests that it was not closely related to endosymbiotic Nostoc spp, hetR sequences. Sequences from R, intracellularis-Hemiaulus membranaceus sampled in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans were almost identical, demonstrating that the genetic relatedness was not dependent on geographical location, All sequences displayed a deep divergence between symbionts from different genera and a high degree of host specificity.

  • 5.
    Jørgensen, Bo Barker
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Andrén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Marshall, Ian P G
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Sub-seafloor biogeochemical processes and microbial life in the Baltic Sea2020In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1688-1706Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The post-glacial Baltic Sea has experienced extreme changes that are archived today in the deep sediments. IODP Expedition 347 retrieved cores down to 100 m depth and studied the climate history and the deep biosphere. We here review the biogeochemical and microbiological highlights and integrate these with other studies from the Baltic seabed. Cell numbers, endospore abundance and organic matter mineralization rates are extremely high. A 100-fold drop in cell numbers with depth results from a small difference between growth and mortality in the ageing sediment. Evidence for growth derives from a D:L amino acid racemization model, while evidence for mortality derives from the abundance and potential activity of lytic viruses. The deep communities assemble at the bottom of the bioturbated zone from the founding surface community by selection of organisms suited for life under deep sediment conditions. The mean catabolic per-cell rate of microorganisms drops steeply with depth to a life in slow-motion, typical for the deep biosphere. The subsurface life under extreme energy limitation is facilitated by exploitation of recalcitrant substrates, by biochemical protection of nucleic acids and proteins, and by repair mechanisms for random mismatches in DNA or damaged amino acids in proteins. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Matos, Marina N
    et al.
    Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos, Puerto Madryn, Argentina.
    Lozada, Mariana
    Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos, Puerto Madryn, Argentina.
    Anselmino, Luciano E
    Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos, Puerto Madryn, Argentina.
    Musumeci, Matías A
    Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos, Puerto Madryn, Argentina.
    Henrissat, Bernard
    Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France / INRA, Marseille, France / King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
    Jansson, Janet K.
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, USA.
    Mac Cormack, Walter P
    Instituto Antártico Argentino, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina / Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Carroll, JoLynn
    High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment, Tromsø, Norway / UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sjöling, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Biology.
    Lundgren, Leif
    Stockholm University.
    Dionisi, Hebe M
    Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos, Puerto Madryn, Argentina.
    Metagenomics unveils the attributes of the alginolytic guilds of sediments from four distant cold coastal environments2016In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 4471-4484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alginates are abundant polysaccharides in brown algae that constitute an important energy source for marine heterotrophic bacteria. Despite the key role of alginate degradation processes in the marine carbon cycle, little information is available on the bacterial populations involved in these processes. The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of alginate utilization capabilities in cold coastal environments. Sediment metagenomes from four high-latitude regions of both Hemispheres were interrogated for alginate lyase gene homologue sequences and their genomic context. Sediments contained highly abundant and diverse bacterial assemblages with alginolytic potential, including members of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, as well as several poorly characterized taxa. The microbial communities in Arctic and Antarctic sediments exhibited the most similar alginolytic profiles, whereas brackish sediments showed distinct structures with a higher proportion of novel genes. Examination of the gene neighbourhood of the alginate lyase homologues revealed distinct patterns depending on the potential lineage of the scaffolds, with evidence of evolutionary relationships among alginolytic gene clusters from Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. This information is relevant for understanding carbon fluxes in cold coastal environments and provides valuable information for the development of biotechnological applications from brown algae biomass.

  • 7.
    Sommer, Christian
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Hu, Yue
    3Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Molecular, 11 Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna.
    Nascimento, Francisco
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Gunnarsson, Jonas
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Sjöling, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Reduced large-scale beta-diversity and changes in metapopulation patterns of sediment bacterial communities following a major inflow into the Baltic Sea2019In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is heavily affected by eutrophication caused by nutrient overload, climate, and infrequency in major inflow events, resulting in widespread areas of oxygen depleted waters and sediments. A Major Baltic Inflow event (MBI) brings saline and oxygenated Atlantic Ocean water into the Baltic Sea, as occurred in 2014. Using a theoretical framework based on metapopulation and metacommunity theory we predicted a transition of the sediment bacterial community after the MBI, from a more heterogeneous community pattern driven by local colonisation-extinction dynamics towards a more pronounced environmental gradient but with reduced beta-diversities. Community diversity patterns before and after the MBI were investigated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of samples from 42 Baltic Sea environmental monitoring stations. Results showed strong metapopulation dynamics with many satellite and few core taxa. NMDS-ordination showed distinct geographical clustering. After the MBI, alpha-diversity increased, beta-diversity decreased and a significant distance-decay relationship developed. Changes in community composition correlated significantly with changes in oxygen and salinity from 2010 to 2015. Our results indicate strong metapopulation and metacommunity structuring of sediment bacterial diversity and composition in the Baltic Sea and how movements of large-scale water bodies affect bacterial communities through changes in large-scale environmental gradients and dispersal patterns.

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