sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Backman, Agneta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Maraha, Ninwe
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Jansson, Janet K
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science. SLU.
    Impact of temperature on the physiological status of a potential bioremediation inoculant, Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A62004In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 2952-2958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 (A6) can degrade large amounts of 4-chlorophenol in soil at 5 and 28degreesC. In this study, we investigated the effects of temperature on the physiological status of this bacterium in pure culture and in soil. A derivative of A6 tagged with the gfp gene (encoding green fluorescent protein [GFP]) was used to specifically quantify A6 cells in soil. In addition, cyano-ditolyl-tetrazoliumchloride was used to stain GFP-fluorescent cells with an active electron transfer system ("viable cellis") whereas propidium iodide (PI) was used to stain cells with damaged membranes ("dead cells"). Another derivative of the strain (tagged with the firefly luciferase gene [luc]) was used to monitor the metabolic activity of the cell population, since the bioluminescence phenotype is dependent on cellular energy reserves. When the cells were incubated in soil at 28degreesC, the majority were stained with PI, indicating that they had lost their cell integrity. In addition, there was a corresponding decline in metabolic activity and in the ability to be grown in cultures on agar plates after incubation in soil at 28degreesC, indicating that the cells were dying under those conditions. When the cells were incubated in soil at 5degreesC, by contrast, the majority of the cells remained intact and a large fraction of the population remained metabolically active. A similar trend towards better cell survival at lower temperatures was found in pure-culture experiments. These results make A. chlorophenolicus A6 a good candidate for the treatment of chlorophenol-contaminated soil in cold climates.

  • 2.
    Edlund, Anna
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. SLU.
    Jansson, Janet K.
    SLU.
    Changes in active bacterial communities before and after dredging of highly polluted Baltic Sea sediments2006In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 72, no 10, p. 6800-6807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacteria residing in sediments have key functions in the marine food web. However, it has been difficult to correlate the identity and activity of bacteria in sediments due to lack of appropriate methods beyond cultivation-based techniques. Our aim was to use a combination of molecular approaches, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and immunocapture, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to assess the composition of growing bacteria in Baltic Sea sediments. The study site was a highly polluted area off the Swedish coast. The sediments were sampled in two consecutive years, before and after remediation, by dredging of the top sediments. Levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls were dramatically reduced as a result of the cleanup project. The compositions of growing members of the communities were significantly different at the two sampling periods. In particular, members from the class Deltaproteobacteria and genus Spirochaeta were more dominant before dredging, but members of the classes Gammaproteobacteria and the Flavobacteria represented the most dominant growing populations after dredging. We also cultivated isolates from the polluted sediments that could transform the model PAH compound, phenanthrene. Some of these isolates were confirmed as dominant growing populations by the molecular methods as well. This suite of methods enabled us to link the identity and activity of the members of the sediment communities.

  • 3.
    Jernberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science. Karolinska Institute.
    Sullivan, A
    Karolinska Institute.
    Edlund, Charlotta
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science. Karolinska Institute.
    Jansson, J K
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Monitoring of antibiotic-induced alterations in the human intestinal microflora and detection of probiotic strains by use of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism2005In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 501-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was investigated as a tool for monitoring the human intestinal microflora during antibiotic treatment and during ingestion of a probiotic product. Fecal samples from eight healthy volunteers were taken before, during, and after administration of clindamycin. During treatment, four subjects were given a probiotic, and four subjects were given a placebo. Changes in the microbial intestinal community composition and relative abundance of specific microbial populations in each subject were monitored by using viable counts and T-RFLP fingerprints. T-RFLP was also used to monitor specific bacterial populations that were either positively or negatively affected by clindamycin. Some dominant bacterial groups, such as Eubacterium spp., were easily monitored by T-RFLP, while they were hard to recover by cultivation. Furthermore, the two probiotic Lactobacillus strains were easily tracked by T-RFLP and were shown to be the dominant Lactobacillus community members in the intestinal microflora of subjects who received the probiotic.

  • 4.
    Lowder, M
    et al.
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, USA.
    Unge, A
    Stockholms universitet.
    Maraha, Ninwe
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Jansson, Janet K
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Stockholms universitet.
    Swiggett, J
    Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, USA.
    Oliver, J D
    University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, USA.
    Effect of starvation and the viable-but-nonculturable state on green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence in GFP-tagged Pseudomonas fluorescens A5062000In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 3160-3165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, gfp, of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is being used as a reporter system for gene expression and as a marker for tracking prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Cells that have been genetically altered with the gfp gene produce a protein that fluoresces when it is excited by UV light. This unique phenotype allows gth-tagged cells to be specifically monitored by nondestructive means, In this study we determined whether a gfp-tagged strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens continued to fluoresce under conditions under which the cells were starved, viable but nonculturable (VBNC), or dead. Epifluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectrofluorometry were used to measure fluorescence intensity in starved, VBNC, and dead or dying cells. Results obtained by using how cytometry indicated that microcosms containing VBNC cells, which were obtained by incubation under stress conditions (starvation at 37.5 degrees C), fluoresced at an intensity that mas at least 80% of the intensity of nonstressed cultures, Similarly, microcosms containing starved cells incubated at 5 and 30 degrees C had fluorescence intensities that were 90 to 110% of the intensity of nonstressed cells. VBNC cells remained fluorescent during the entire 6-month incubation period. in addition, cells starved at 5 or 30 degrees C remained fluorescent for at least 11 months. Treatment of the cells with UV light or incubation at 39 or 50 degrees C resulted in a loss of GFP from the cells. There was a strong correlation between cell death and leakage of GFP from the cells, although the extent of leakage varied depending on the treatment, Most dead cells were not GFP fluorescent, but a small proportion of the dead cells retained some GFP at a lower concentration than the concentration in live cells, Our results suggest that gfp-tagged cells remain fluorescent following starvation and entry into the VBNC state but that fluorescence is lost when the cells die, presumably because membrane integrity is lost.

  • 5.
    Lu, Zexun
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
    Tombolini, R
    Woo, S
    Zeilinger, S
    Lorito, M
    Jansson, Janet K
    Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science. SLU.
    In vivo study of Trichoderma-pathogen-plant interactions, using constitutive and inducible green fluorescent protein reporter systems2004In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 3073-3081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant tissue colonization by Trichoderma atroviride plays a critical role in the reduction of diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi, but this process has not been thoroughly studied in situ. We monitored in Situ interactions between gfp-tagged biocontrol strains of T. atroviride and soilborne plant pathogens that were grown in cocultures and on cucumber seeds by confocal scanning laser microscopy and fluorescence stereomicroscopy. Spores of T. atroviride adhered to Pythium ultimum mycelia in coculture experiments. In mycoparasitic interactions of T. atroviride with P. ultimum or Rhizoctonia solani, the mycoparasitic hyphae grew alongside the pathogen mycelia, and this was followed by coiling and formation of specialized structures similar to hooks, appressoria, and papillae. The morphological changes observed depended on the pathogen tested. Branching of T. atroviride mycelium appeared to be an active response to the presence of the pathogenic host. Mycoparasitism of P. ultimum by T. atroviride occurred on cucumber seed surfaces while the seeds were germinating. The interaction of these fungi on the cucumber seeds was similar to the interaction observed in coculture experiments. Green fluorescent protein expression under the control of host-inducible promoters was also studied. The induction of specific Trichoderma genes was monitored visually in cocultures, on plant surfaces, and in soil in the presence of colloidal chitin or Rhizoctonia by confocal microscopy and fluorescence stereomicroscopy. These tools allowed initiation of the mycoparasitic gene expression cascade to be monitored in vivo.

  • 6.
    Nordin, Karolina
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Stockholm University.
    Unell, M
    Jansson, Janet K
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. SLU.
    Novel 4-chlorophenol degradation gene cluster and degradation route via hydroxyquinol in Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A62005In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 71, no 11, p. 6538-6544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6, a previously described 4-chlorophenol-degrading strain, was found to degrade 4-chlorophenol via hydroxyquinol, which is a novel route for aerobic microbial degradation of this compound. In addition, 10 open reading frames exhibiting sequence similarity to genes encoding enzymes involved in chlorophenol degradation were cloned and designated part of a chlorophenol degradation gene cluster (cph genes). Several of the open reading frames appeared to encode enzymes with similar functions; these open reading frames included two genes, cphA-I and cphA-H, which were shown to encode functional hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenases. Disruption of the cphA-I gene yielded a mutant that exhibited negligible growth on 4-chlorophenol, thereby linking the cph gene cluster to functional catabolism of 4-chlorophenol in A. chlorophenolicus A6. The presence of a resolvase pseudogene in the cph gene cluster together with analyses of the G+C content and codon bias of flanking genes suggested that horizontal gene transfer was involved in assembly of the gene cluster during evolution of the ability of the strain to grow on 4-chlorophenol.

  • 7.
    Rahman, Mokhlasur
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Huys, Geert
    Rahman, Motiur
    Albert, M. John
    Kuhn, Inger
    Möllby, Roland
    Persistence, transmission, and virulence characteristics of Aeromonas strains in a duckweed aquaculture-based hospital sewage water recycling plant in Bangladesh2007In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 1444-1451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The persistence and transmission of Aeromonas in a duckweed aquaculture-based hospital sewage water treatment plant in Bangladesh was studied. A total of 670 samples from different sites of the hospital sewage water treatment plant, from feces of hospitalized children suffering from diarrhea, from environmental control ponds, and from feces of healthy humans were collected over a period of three years. In total, 1,315 presumptive Aeromonas isolates were biochemically typed by the PhenePlate rapid screening system (PhP-AE). A selection of 90 representative isolates was further analyzed with PhenePlate (PhP) extended typing (PhP-48), fatty acid methyl ester analysis, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting. In addition, the prevalence of the putative virulence factors hemolysin and cytotoxin and the presence of the cytolytic enterotoxin gene (AHCYTOEN) were analyzed. Aeromonas was found at all sites of the treatment plant, in 40% of the samples from environmental control ponds, in 8.5% of the samples from hospitalized children suffering from diarrhea, and in 3.5% of samples from healthy humans. A significantly high number of Aeromonas bacteria was found in duckweed, which indicates that duckweed may serve as a reservoir for these bacteria. PhP-AE typing allowed identification of more than 192 distinct PhP types, of which 18 major PhP types (MTs) were found in multiple sites and during several occasions. AFLP fingerprinting revealed the prevalence of genotypically indistinguishable Aeromonas isolates among certain PhP MTs recovered from different sampling occasions and/or at multiple sites. Hemolytic and cytotoxic activities were observed in 43% of the tested strains, whereas 29% possessed the cytolytic enterotoxin gene AHCYTOEN. Collectively, two specific MTs associated with diarrhea were shown to exhibit high cytotoxicity. Furthermore, all tested isolates of these major types were positive for the cytolytic enterotoxin gene. In conclusion, our data indicate that certain phenotypically and genotypically stable clonal lineages of Aeromonas have persisted in the treatment system for a prolonged period and might spread from the hospitalized children suffering from diarrhea to fish produced for human consumption through the sewage water treatment system.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf