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  • 1. Boström, Magnus
    Cognitive Practices and Collective Identities within a Heterogeneous Social Movement: The Swedish Environmental Movement2004In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Social Movement Studies:, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 73-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies on social movements have highlighted the importance of cultural and ideational factors. Concepts such as collective identity, cognitive praxis, and framing have been used to better understand the emergence, development, and political and cultural impact of social movements. In this article I draw on different schools of thought in order to develop a new use of the concept of cognitive practice. I suggest the relevance of analysing collective identities and cognitive practices at the organizational level (which does not, per se, exclude analysis at other levels). This emphasis also leads to a perspective that suggest a relational and interaction-oriented way in which to understand how movement organizations try to influence other actors through their cognitive practices. This kind of analysis helps to question the implicit notion of unity in the concept of social movement. The analytical focal points are also useful for discussing possibilities and dilemmas for movement organizations with regard to aspects such as how frames become effective and make frame resonance possible; how compromises and delimitations are built into frames; and how cognitive autonomy may be decreased or preserved. The empirical focus in this article is the Swedish environmental movement, and the identities and cognitive practices of some its organizations in the 1990s. I also discuss the relevance of my findings for the study of movement organizations within other fields

  • 2.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Lindblom, Jonas
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Moral reflexivity and dramaturgical action in social movement activism: The case of the Plowshares and Animal Rights Sweden2012In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 41-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on Durkheim's sociology of morality, which identifies ideals and norms as the key components of morality, this article outlines a theoretical model for understanding how social movements can bring about legitimate social change. Social movement activists, we propose, can be conceptualized as followers and pursuers of sacred ideals. As such, they frequently come into conflict with existing norms in society. To manage this dilemma, activists must downplay their role as norm breakers while emphasizing their identity as followers of ideals. This in turn requires moral reflexivity in the staging of collective action. The article shows how dramaturgical control (Goffman) is exercised towards this end among activists engaged in two social movements in Sweden: the Plowshares peace movement and Animal Rights Sweden. The article further examines the internal stratification, or ‘moral hierarchies’, within the two activist groups in the light of the proposed model. The closer the activists were able to adhere to the sacred ideal, the higher the social status they enjoyed within the group.

  • 3.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    After a Cycle of Contention: Post-Gothenburg Strategies of Left-Libertarian Activists in Sweden2015In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 713-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers the strategic choices that radical activists face when a cycle of contention ends. It investigates the re-orientation of the autonomous anarchists or left-libertarian activist milieu in Sweden after the riots at the Gothenburg summit in 2001, which ended a cycle of anti-globalization protests in Sweden. The article identifies five strategies by which this activist milieu attempted to reconstruct collective agency, build a new alliance structure and renew the repertoire of contention: 1) rescaling and targeting of micro-politics; 2) moving from secluded to open communities; 3) rethinking collective agency with the help of a new movement theory; 4) reversing dominant discourses and opening up discursive space; and 5) redefining militancy and shelving of violent confrontation. The study builds on activist interviews and ethnographic research in Stockholm and Malmö.

  • 4.
    Kaun, Anne
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Treré, Emiliano
    Cardiff University, Cardiff ,UK.
    Repression, resistance and lifestyle: charting (dis)connection and activism in times of accelerated capitalism2018In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the nexus of media and social movements is a growing subfield in both media and social movement studies. Although there is an increasing number of studies that criticize the overemphasis of the importance of media technologies for social movements, questions of non-use, technology push-back and media refusal as explicit political practice have received comparatively little attention. The article charts a typology of digital disconnection as political practice and site of struggle bringing emerging literatures on disconnection, i.e. forms of media technology non-use to the field of social movement studies and studies of civic engagement. Based on a theoretical matrix combining questions of power, collectivity and temporality, we distinguish between digital disconnection as repression, digital disconnection as resistance and digital disconnection as performance and life-style politics. The article discusses the three types of digital disconnection using current examples of protest and social movements that engage with practices of disconnection.

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  • 5.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Green Activism in Post-Socialist Europe and the former Soviet Union2016In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 242-244Article, book review (Other academic)
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