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  • 1.
    Billingsley, Sunnee
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). Stockholm University.
    Duntava, Aija
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). Uppsala University.
    Putting the pieces together: 40 years of fertility trends across 19 post-socialist countries2017In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 389-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic change has been a key consequence of transition, but few studies trace fertility trends across countries over time. We describe fertility trends immediately before and after the fall of state socialism across 19 Central and Eastern European and Central Asian countries. We found a few common patterns that may reflect economic and political developments. The countries that experienced the most successful transitions and integration into the EU experienced marked postponement of parenthood and a moderate decline in second and third births. Little economic change in the poorest transition countries was accompanied by less dramatic changes in childbearing behavior. In western post-Soviet contexts, and somewhat in Bulgaria and Romania, women became more likely to only have one child but parenthood was not substantially postponed. This unique demographic pattern seems to reflect an unwavering commitment to parenthood but economic conditions and opportunities that did not support having more than one child. In addition, we identify countries that would provide fruitful case studies because they do not fit general patterns.

  • 2.
    Gentile, Michael
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    West oriented in the East-oriented Donbas: a political stratigraphy of geopolitical identity in Luhansk, Ukraine2015In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 201-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on data from a survey (n = 4000) conducted in the eastern Ukrainian city of Luhansk in late 2013, this article explores the link between national identity and foreign policy preferences in the Donbas, suggesting that they are increasingly conflated in distinct geopolitical identities. Descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression are used to compare the characteristics of pro-West and uncertain individuals with those of the pro-Russian/Soviet individuals, with preferences on North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and European Union (EU) accession underlying this distinction. The results show that geopolitical identities in Luhansk have a complex political stratigraphy that includes demographic, socioeconomic, cultural, and attitudinal components. The pro-West constituency is younger, not Russian but often including members of other ethnic groups, well educated, more tolerant toward sexual minorities, generally more satisfied with life, and it also speaks better English. Conversely, those with pro-Russia/Soviet geopolitical identities are older, Russian, low educated, less fluent in English, intolerant, and unsatisfied with their lives. Uncertainty is more randomly distributed among social groups, indicating different underlying causes related to the source of the respondents’ uncertainty.

  • 3.
    Gentile, Michael
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). Umeå University.
    Sjöberg, Örjan
    Housing allocation under socialism: the Soviet case revisited2013In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 173-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social or public housing is an important component of the housing supply= n most European countries. Nowhere, however, has the notion of social hou= ng been taken as far as in the countries that formerly were ruled by soci= ist regimes, most notably the Soviet Union. For this reason, it may be ar= ed that the development of theorizations on housing has much to learn fro= this large but inconclusively studied example. One of the avowed virtues = socialism was that the system, in theory, guaranteed its subjects equal = ghts to housing. That this was not quite the case is well known in the li= rature, but in fact no robust evidence to support this view (or the contr= y) has been presented so far. Therefore, this paper's aim is to investiga= the functioning of the Soviet system of housing allocation, assessing it= claims to social equity and justice. Based on a detailed case study of ab= t 3500 Soviet-era housing allocation decisions made in Daugavpils, Latvia= at five poin! s in time covering various stages in the development of Soviet power (ful= coverage of decisions made in 1953, 1960, 1970, 1980, and January-April 1= 0), we illustrate how much living space was allocated to whom. In additio= we detail the characteristics of the waiting times involved. We apply bo= descriptive and regression methods on our data-set, making a significant= ontribution to what is known about the outcome of housing allocation unde= socialism and, at a more general level, under strictly supply-constrained= onditions.

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