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  • 1.
    Appelgren, Ester
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    An Illusion of Interactivity: The paternalistic side of data journalism2018In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 308-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores paternalism in contemporary data journalism, a hybrid form of journalism where parts of the engineering culture are blended with the culture of journalism. Technologists often question paternalistic elements in design, whereas journalists consider paternalistic decision-making to be justified as an inherent part of what journalism is. Based on a predominately qualitative content analysis of paternalistic elements in 31 data journalistic projects submitted to the Nordic Data Journalism Awards in 2013, 2015 and 2016, three characteristics of paternalism were found: controlling functionality, the illusion of interactivity and linearity. All three characteristics include several types of control over the audience control, embedded in the design, and as previous research has found that paternalism is often associated with negative effects, on the basis of journalistic choices in design and presentation involving technology, the problem is whether the audience begins to perceive data journalism as controlling, non-transparent or intrusive.

  • 2.
    Appelgren, Ester
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Remaining in Control with an Illusion of Interactivity: The Paternalistic Side of Data Journalism*2019In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, no 8, p. 956-960Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Salaverría, Ramón
    School of Communication, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spa.
    The Promise of the Transparency Culture: A comparative study of access to public data in Spanish and Swedish newsrooms2018In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 986-996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2013, with the introduction of the Transparency Law in Spain, a number of Spanish newsrooms started working with data journalism methods. In Sweden, which has one of the oldest Freedom of Information acts in the world, newsrooms invested in the skill development of data journalism at approximately the same time. Because previous research suggests that access to public data has been one of the key driving forces for the development of data journalism worldwide, it is important to understand how legislation is actually shaping the practice of data journalism. Based on a survey of 66 key informants in Spain and Sweden and ten in-depth interviews with data journalists from five media companies in each country, we conducted a comparative study, building on the frameworks of media systems to explore data journalism practices in these two countries. The differences found indicate that the national and EU legislation in both nations shape journalistic strategies for accessing data, turning journalists at times into activists fighting for the right to access public data. Beyond the law, data journalists advocate for a transparency culture among the civil servants, in order to secure public accountability.

  • 4.
    Ekman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för mediestudier.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för mediestudier.
    Politicians as Media Producers: Current trajectories in the relation between journalists and politicians in the age of social media2015In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 78-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of social media raises new questions concerning the relationship between journalists and politicians and between news media and politics. The increasingly complex media milieu, in which the boundaries between media producers and audiences become partly dissolved, calls for new theoretical approaches in the study of journalism. This article reassesses central theoretical arguments about the relationship between journalism, sources, politics and democracy. Drawing on a pilot study of the printed press, it explores the increased social media use among politicians in Sweden and its implications for political journalism. The article suggests that power relations between journalism and politics can be fruitfully explored from the perspective of mediatized interdependency, a perspective that acknowledges that journalists and politicians have become both actors and sources through mutual interaction in online spaces. Furthermore, it argues that social media use has expanded journalisms interest in the private life of politicians, thereby contributing to a de-politicization of politics.

  • 5.
    Graf, Heike
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    What Structures?: A communicative approach to ethnic diversity in German media companies2017In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 544-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how the topic of an ethnically diverse workforce can become an organiz- ational problem (or not) in private media companies. The study is based on interviews with Human Resources managers and persons responsible for diversity issues at these companies. This article favors a communicative approach by relating structures to agency through the concept of expectation. This is in contrast to the bulk of media research, which considers structures as something fixed and objective in determining organizational action. By exploring the expec- tations structures we can see which expectation patterns condition organizational communication. As a result, the main pattern of migrant background as adding value to the organization (or not) could be revealed as a guiding distinction in organizational communication about diverse workforces. 

  • 6.
    Johansson, Sofia
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Media and Communication Studies.
    Gossip, sport and pretty girls: What does ‘trivial’ journalism mean to tabloid newspaper readers?2008In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 402-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the centre of media controversy, tabloids continue to be the best-read newspapers in Britain. Competing for the largest group of the British newspaper readers, these papers have been criticized for abandoning their journalistic responsibility, to the detriment of society and the media climate at large. Yet, little research has been conducted on the reception of tabloid journalism. Building on the ongoing debate about popular journalism and “tabloidization”, this article draws on focus groups and interviews with 55 male and female young adult readers of the Sun and the Daily Mirror, the two circulation leaders among the popular tabloids. It provides an analysis of readers' experiences of what is often perceived of as typically “trivial” tabloid journalism, such as human interest, sport and celebrity stories, with the aim of providing a better understanding of the popularity of this kind of newspaper content. In doing so, readers' experiences are related to day-to-day routines and the social structures surrounding these, and the article shows how tabloid newspaper reading links with a wider social context.

  • 7.
    Leckner, S.
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Tenor, Carina
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    What About the Hyperlocals?: The drivers, organization and economy of independent news media in Sweden2019In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 68-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a survey of a sample of hyperlocal actors in Sweden (N = 178), this article examines preconditions, motivations and sustainability for hyperlocal media operations, outside the traditional media chains, in order to provide a picture of their function in the current media landscape, and to further build on the understanding of the hyperlocal business model. This study extends the hyperlocal definition by including media platforms other than websites. The results show that the operations indeed aim to support and foster citizenship, strengthen democracy and mirror the local community. At the same time, as shown by other studies, the fact that they are not large-scale, highly profitable operations may challenge their sustainability. Nonetheless, most of them claim to be profitable, largely because of the print platform, and have a positive outlook on the future. Revenues from advertising and readership are currently less substantial for Web-based operations, which reinforces the need to broaden the definition of hyperlocal publishing platforms when talking about financial sustainability. Currently, hyperlocal media in Sweden, with small resources and a lower publishing frequency, cannot be viewed as a replacement of established media, but play important roles as complementary alternative voices and contribute to media plurality in the local community.

  • 8.
    Nygren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Journalism.
    Degtereva, Elena
    Södertörn University, School of Communication, Media and it, Journalism.
    Russian and Swedish Journalists: Professional roles, ideals and daily reality2012In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 6, no 5-6, p. 732-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To strive for autonomy is key to professional journalistic culture, although the degree of autonomy varies between countries and media systems. A survey distributed to 100 journalists in Sweden and Russia explores their views on journalistic autonomy: the professional duties of journalists, the degree of autonomy they enjoy in their day-to-day work, as well as journalists’ opinions about the development of press freedom. The findings reveal that journalists in both countries share many professional values but also feel pressures on their professional autonomy in Sweden mostly a commercial pressure and in Russia predominantly a political pressure but also the commercial interests of owners and advertisers. There are also some clear differences. Independence in daily work is less for Russian journalists and the obstacles ahead of publishing more common and they have a negative view on the development of press freedom.

  • 9.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Roosvall, Anna
    Stockholm University.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.
    The Political in Cultural Journalism: Fragmented interpretative communities in the digital age2015In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 773-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how nine Swedish cultural editors and managers in mainstream media institutions define cultural journalism and its political dimensions during times of increased digitization and media convergence. Swedish cultural journalism is aesthetic and political critique applied to subject areas (music, literature, etc.) and contemporary societal and ethical issues. Drawing on Zelizer we ask whether there is a common interpretive community of cultural journalists in different media regarding: (1) how they define their scope, (2) how they understand “the political” in cultural journalism and its implications for democracy, and (3) how they view media convergence and digitalization. We find that although editors/managers from different media share a basic understanding of cultural journalism as an alternative perspective to news, “the political” in cultural journalism is approached differently in the press and the public service broadcast media. Furthermore, due in part to structural conditions, they also see the effects of digitization differently, forming sub-communities on two counts. This study thus contributes new knowledge to a field previously focused almost exclusively on newspapers.

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