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  • 1. Karlsson, Jessika
    et al.
    Juslin, Patrik N.
    Musical expression: an observational study of instrumental teaching2008In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 309-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that both music students and teachers think that expression is important. Yet, we know little about how expression is taught to students. Such knowledge is needed in order to enhance teaching of expression. The aim of this study was thus to explore the nature of instrumental music teaching in its natural context, with a focus on expression and emotion. Lessons featuring five music teachers and 12 students were videofilmed, transcribed, content analyzed, and coded into categories of feedback and language use. Results suggested that the focus of teaching was mainly on technique and on the written score. Lessons were dominated by talk, with the teacher doing most of the talking. Issues concerning expression and emotion were mostly dealt with implicitly rather than explicitly, although some teachers used a variety of strategies to enhance expression. Though there were individual differences among teachers, a common feature was the lack of clear goals, specific tasks, and systematic teaching patterns.

  • 2.
    Laukka, Petri
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Quick, Lina
    University of Gävle.
    Emotional and motivational uses of music in sports and exercise: A questionnaire study among athletes2013In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 198-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music is present in many sport and exercise situations, but empirical investigations on the motives for listening to music in sports remain scarce. In this study, Swedish elite athletes (N = 252) answered a questionnaire that focused on the emotional and motivational uses of music in sports and exercise. The questionnaire contained both quantitative items that assessed the prevalence of various uses of music, and open-ended items that targeted specific emotional episodes in relation to music in sports. Results showed that the athletes most often reported listening to music during pre-event preparations, warm-up, and training sessions; and the most common motives for listening to music were to increase pre-event activation, positive affect, motivation, performance levels and to experience flow. The athletes further reported that they mainly experienced positive affective states (e.g., happiness, alertness, confidence, relaxation) in relation to music in sports, and also reported on their beliefs about the causes of the musical emotion episodes in sports. In general, the results suggest that the athletes used music in purposeful ways in order to facilitate their training and performance.

  • 3.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Exploring personality and musical self-perceptions among vocalists and instrumentalists at music colleges2019In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 465-482Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Sandgren, Maria
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    How modes of instrumental practice are distributed in three musical genres and among vocalists and instrumentalists at music colleges2019In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 767-778Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Yamasaki, Teruo
    et al.
    Osaka Shoin Women’s University, Japan.
    Yamada, Keiko
    Osaka Shoin Women’s University, Japan.
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholms universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Viewing the world through the prism of music: Effects of music on perceptions of the environment2015In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questionnaire and interview studies suggest that music is valued for its role in managing the listener’s impression of the environment, but systematic investigations on the topic are scarce. We present a field experiment wherein participants were asked to rate their impression of four different environments (a quiet residential area, traveling by train in the suburbs, at a busy crossroads, and in a tranquil park area) on bipolar adjective scales, while listening to music (which varied regarding level of perceived activation and valence) or in silence. Results showed that the evaluation of the environment was in general affected in the direction of the characteristics of the music, especially in conditions where the perceived characteristics of the music and environment were incongruent. For example, highly active music increased the activation ratings of environments which were perceived as inactive without music, whereas inactive music decreased the activation ratings of environments which were perceived as highly active without music. Also, highly positive music increased the positivity ratings of the environments. In sum, the findings suggest that music may function as a prism that modifies the impression of one’s surroundings. Different theoretical explanations of the results are discussed.

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