sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Boalt, Elin
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Tolerance to apical and foliar damage: costs and mechanisms in Raphanus raphanistrum2007In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 116, no 12, p. 2071-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to herbivore damage, we used apical and foliar damage as experimental treatments to study whether there are similar tolerance mechanisms to different types of damage. We also studied whether tolerance to different types of damage are associated, and whether there is a cost involved in plant tolerance to different types of herbivore damage. Our greenhouse experiment involved 480 plants from 30 full-sib families of an annual weed Raphanus raphanistrum, wild radish, which were subjected to control and two different simulated herbivore damage treatments, apex removal and foliar damage of 30% of leaf area. Apical damage significantly decreased seed production, whereas foliar damage had no effect. There was a significant genetic variation for tolerance to foliar, but not apical damage. No costs were observed in terms of negative correlation between tolerance to either damage type and fitness of undamaged plants. Tolerances to apical and foliar damage were not significantly correlated with each other. We observed a larger number of significant associations between tolerance and reproductive traits than between tolerance and vegetative traits. Plant height and leaf size of damaged plants interacted in their association to tolerance to foliar damage. Inflorescence number and pollen quantity per flower of damaged plants were positively associated with tolerance to apical damage. In late-flowering genotypes, petal size of undamaged plants and pollen quantity of damaged plants were positively associated with tolerance to foliar damage. In summary, traits involved in floral display and male fitness were associated with plant tolerance to herbivore damage.

  • 2.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm university.
    Jerling, Lenn
    Stockholm university.
    Spatial distribution of male sterility in Plantago maritima1998In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 81, p. 255-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual polymorphism in angiosperms can be explained both by the functional responses of male and female function to autogamy and geitonogamy, and by the conflict between the nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes. In predominantly hermaphrodite species, cytoplasmically determined male sterility may persist in a population because of maternal inheritance, i.e, the loss of male function does not change the fitness of the cytoplasmic genome. However, in populations with cytoplasmic male sterility, male fertility is often restored by nuclear genes. Therefore, in populations with genetical substructure, the frequencies of the different sex-morphs will fluctuate depending on the presence of both the male sterile cytoplasms, and of their specific nuclear restorer genes. In Plantagomaritima, we showed that the frequencies of male sterility were highest in regions with the highest population turnover rates and that male sterile individuals were more frequently found in the lower, less dense parts of the meadows. This indicates that male sterile cytoplasms have their highest probabilities to escape their nuclear restorer genes during recolonisation in disturbed regions within populations. We also found that male sterile individuals dispersed their seeds a little bit further than did the hermaphrodites. This can be interpreted as an adaptive response to the local occurrence of nuclear restorer genes.

  • 3. Ehrlén, Johan
    et al.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Stockholm University.
    How perennial are perennial plants?2002In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 308-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trade-offs involving life span are important in the molding of plant life histories. However, the empirical examination of such patterns has so far been limited by the fact that information on life span is mainly available in terms of discrete categories; annuals, semelparous perennials and iteroparous perennials. We used transition matrix models to project continuous estimates of conditional life spans from published information on size- or stage-structured demography for 71 perennial plant species. The projected life span ranged from 4.3 to 988.6 years and more than half of the species had a life span of more than 35 years. Woody plants had on average a projected life span more than four times as long as non-woody plants. Life spans were higher in forests than in open habitats and individuals of non-clonal species tended to have a longer life span than ramets of clonal species. Self-incompatible plants on average lived longer than self-compatible plants. There were no clear relations between life span and geographical region, dispersal syndrome, pollination mode, seed size or the presence of a seed bank. We conclude that accurate estimates of life span are central to understand how longevity is correlated to other traits within the group of perennial plants.

  • 4.
    Lönn, Mikael
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap.
    Prentice, Honor C.
    Gene diversity and demographic turnover in central and peripheral populations of the perennial herb, Gypsophila fastigiata2002In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 489-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within-population gene diversity (HS) was estimated (using allozyme markers) for 16 populations of the perennial, outcrossing plant, Gypsophila fastigiata, on the Baltic island of Öland. The populations were characterized by data on extent, density, life-stages, and habitat diversity. Populations were classed as central or peripheral in relation to the distribution of “alvar” (habitats with shallow, calcareous soils on limestone bedrock) on southern Öland. Three minimal adequate models were used to explain HS and the proportions of juveniles and dead adults. In the first model, HS was significantly lower in peripheral populations and there were no significant additional effects of other explanatory variables. The lower diversity in peripheral populations can be explained by a combination of genetic drift (in populations that vary in size in response to habitat fragmentation) and lower levels of interpopulation gene flow than in central populations. In the two life-stage models, peripheral populations had significantly larger proportions of both juveniles and dead adults – indicating a greater demographic turnover than in the central populations. There were also significant effects of HS and species diversity on the proportion of juveniles. The central or peripheral position of populations is the strongest predictor of both within-population gene diversity and life-stage dynamics in Öland G. fastigiata.

  • 5. Olsén, K Håkan
    et al.
    Bjerselius, Rickard
    Petersson, Erik
    Järvi, Torbjörn
    Mayer, Ian
    Hedenskog, Mikael
    Lack of species-specific primer effects of odours from female Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, and brown trout, Salmo trutta2000In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We exposed, in two successive spawning seasons, individually placed precocious male Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) parr to odour stimuli (ovarian fluid and urine mix) from ovulated conspecific or heterospecific anadromous females. Atlantic salmon parr had significantly higher plasma concentrations of the hormones 17 alpha,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20 beta-P), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and testosterone (T) after exposure to odours from conspecific females or from brown trout females compared to parr exposed to a control solution (0.9% NaCl). We did not observe any significant differences between the hormone levels in salmon parr exposed to the two female odours. The salmon parr exposed to conspecific odours had significantly higher volumes of strippable milt compared to the controls, but we did not find any significant differences when comparing the effect of the two female odours. Brown trout parr had significantly higher plasma 17,20 beta-P levels following exposure to heterospecific female odours compared to control males, but there was no significant difference between males exposed to the different female odours. We did not observe any significant differences in plasma levels of T and 11-KT and in milt volumes between exposed and control trout. Taken together, the results from both tested species indicate that the potency of heterospecific stimuli in stimulating increased plasma sex steroid hormone levels in male parr was as strong as stimuli from conspecific females. The results are discussed in connection to observed hybridisation between the two sympatric species.

  • 6.
    Plue, Jan
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Stockholm University.
    Cousins, S. A. O.
    Stockholm University.
    Seed dispersal in both space and time is necessary for plant diversity maintenance in fragmented landscapes2018In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 127, no 6, p. 780-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metacommunity theory emphasizes that seed dispersal not only limits but equally maintains plant diversity, though the latter receives little empirical attention. Discerning the temporal and spatial components of seed dispersal and understanding how their interaction shapes fragmented communities and maintains their diversity may be pivotal to further our ecological understanding of spatial and temporal seed dispersal and its implications for landscape-scale conservation management. To investigate the relative importance of spatial and temporal seed dispersal and their roles in maintaining plant diversity, the herb layer and seed bank of grassland communities were inventoried in 77 sites across abandoned and intact rotational grazing networks in a 100 km2 fragmented grassland landscape in the Stockholm archipelago (Baltic Sea, Sweden). Besides analysing alpha- and beta-diversity patterns, nestedness analyses connect deterministic community changes and diversity losses with dispersal-related life-history traits and habitat specialization to identify the mechanism driving community changes and maintaining local diversity. The loss of rotational grazing networks caused community diversity declines via non-random extinctions of spatially and temporally poor dispersers, particularly among grassland specialists. Temporal seed dispersal halted further community disassembly, maintaining diversity in the abandoned grazing networks. Spatial dispersal within the intact grazing networks was found to be an overriding, homogenizing agent conserving diversity in both the herb layer and seed bank. This empirical evidence establishes how spatial and temporal seed dispersal interact to maintain diversity in fragmented landscapes. Poorly connected grasslands appear limited by spatial dispersal, yet are maintained by temporal seed dispersal. In fragmented landscapes where grazing networks are rarely present, temporal rather than spatial seed dispersal may be more important in maintaining species diversity, since effective spatial dispersal may be significantly diminished. The grazing network's efficacy at boosting spatial dispersal and upholding community diversity presents a powerful management tool to conserve local and regional species diversity. © 2017 The Authors

  • 7.
    Ramula, Satu
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Importance of correlations among matrix entries in stochastic models in relation to number of transition matrices2005In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stochastic matrix models are used to predict population viability and the risk of extinction. Different stochastic methods require different amounts of estimation effort and may lead to divergent estimates. We used 16 transition matrices collected from ten populations of the perennial herb Primula veris to compare population estimates produced by different stochastic methods, such as selection of matrices, selection of vital rates, selection of matrix elements, and Tuljapurkar's approximation. Specifically, we tested the reliability of the methods using different numbers of transition matrices, and examined the importance of correlations among matrix entries. When correlations among matrix entries were included in the models, selection of vital rates produced the lowest and Tuljapurkar's approximation produced the highest estimates of mean population growth rates. Selection of matrices and matrix elements often produced nearly similar population estimates. Simulations based on incompletely estimated correlations among matrix entries considerably differed from those based on all correlations estimated, particularly when correlations were strong. The magnitude of correlations among matrix entries depended on the number of matrices, which made it difficult to generalize correlations within a species. Given that selection of vital rates or matrix elements is used, correlations among matrix entries should usually be included in the model, and they should preferably be estimated from the present data rather than according to other information of the species.

  • 8.
    Ramula, Satu
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Matrix dimensionality in demographic analyses of plants: when to use smaller matrices?2005In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 563-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large data requirements may restrict the use of matrix population models for analysis of population dynamics. Less data are required for a small population matrix than for a large matrix because the smaller matrix contains fewer vital rates that need to be estimated. Smaller matrices, however, tend to have a lower precision. Based on 37 plant species, we studied the effects of matrix dimensionality on the long-term population growth rate (lambda) and the elasticity of lambda in herbaceous and woody species. We found that when matrix dimensionality was reduced, changes in lambda were significantly larger for herbaceous than for woody species. In many cases, lambda of woody species remained virtually the same after a substantial decrease in matrix dimensionality, suggesting that woody species are less susceptible to matrix dimensionality. We demonstrated that when adjacent stages of a transition matrix are combined, the magnitude of a change in lambda depends on the distance of the population structure from a stable stage distribution, and the difference in the combined vital rates weighted by their reproductive values. Elasticity of lambda to survival and fecundity usually increased, whereas elasticity to growth decreased both in herbaceous and in woody species with reduced matrix dimensionality. Changes in elasticity values tended to be larger for herbaceous than for woody species. Our results show that by reducing matrix dimensionality, the amount of demographic data can be decreased to save time, money, and field effort. We recommend the use of a small matrix dimensionality especially when a limited amount of data is available, and for slow-growing species having a simple matrix structure that mainly consists of stasis and growth to the next stage.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf