sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Akan, Adem
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    Language and Power - How Power Influences Language: A conversation analysis on the TV – show "Breaking Bad"2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Power displays itself through talk-in-interaction in social situations; it can also present itself through appearances. Appearance is a personal feature that is immediately obvious and available to others to see. A person’s appearance makes a strong statement about ones values, attitude, abilities etc. People display power through different modalities of talk-in-interactions. This study investigates the linguistic tools that people with power tend to use and how a normal everyday person can change their social status by changing and giving out different linguistic signals. Tracing the patterns of what the verbal cues of power is and describes how an everyday character mastered the relationship between language and power.

  • 2.
    Almgren, Birgitta
    Södertörn University College, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), The German Studies Research Unit.
    Deutschfreundlich oder deutschfeindlich?: Positive und negative Signalwörter im deutsch-schwedischen Diskurs 1933-19452009In: Cross Cultural Communication. vol. 13: Translation und Transgression. Interkulturelle Aspekte der Übersetzung(swissenschaft) / [ed] Ernest W.B. Hess-Lüttich, Bern: Peter Lang , 2009, p. 29-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Almgren, Birgitta
    Södertörn University, School of Political Science, Economics and Law, The German Studies Research Centre.
    Germanistik - Impulse zwischen Schweden und Algerien2004In: IMAGO. Interculturalité et Didactique, ISSN 1111-3936, p. 7-28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Almgren, Birgitta
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, The German Studies Research Centre.
    "Min niuwes hus” och ”wa ist man ahne mand”?: Tyska och svenska i salig blandning sedan medeltiden2007In: Hembygdsföreningen Arboga minne Årsbok, ISSN 0440-680X, p. 28-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Almgren, Birgitta
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Political Science, Economics and Law, The German Studies Research Centre.
    Brylla, Charlotta
    Språk och politik: teoretiska och metodiska reflektioner2005In: Bilder i kontrast: interkulturella processer Sverige/Tyskland i skuggan av nazismen 1933-1945 / [ed] Charlotta Brylla, Birgitta Almgren, Frank-Michael Kirsch, Aalborg: Institut für Sprache und internationale Kulturstudien , 2005, p. 113-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bakken, Michael
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education.
    Lättläst mellan raderna: En jämförande transitivitetsanalys mellan skönlitterär text och dess lättlästa version utifrån ett läsförståelseperspektiv2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to analyze, investigate and compare the eventual differences within the aspects of the ideational metafunction, of the systemic functional linguistics, between two fictional novels and their respective easy-Swedish versions, looking at chosen variables within the theory. The study also investigates how the eventual differences, effects the potential reader by setting the results of the analysis against contemporary research in reading comprehension. The method of use is transitvity analysis based within the ideational metafunction and its variables: processes, participants, circumstances, grammatical metaphors and register. The material that has been analyzed is Sodomsäpplet (Martin, 2016) and Mina drömmars stad (Fogelström, 2009) and their respective easy-Swedish versions.

    The result of the analysis proved that a lot of the material processes had been replaced by relational processes. This contributed to making the easy-Swedish versions more concrete but also static and impersonal, which effected the voice of the author as well as the register and the perspective of telling. The result is discussed with a reading comprehension perspective telling that the easy-Swedish versions not in every way is particularly easy as they displace the register and the authors voice. They also limit the abilities of interpretation for a potential reader.

  • 7.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    A Case Study of a Distance Degree Program in Vietnam: Examples from a Learner-Centered Approach to Distance Education2013In: Cases on Professional Distance Education Degree Programs and Practices: Successes, Challenges, and Issues / [ed] Sullivan, Kirk; Peter E. Czigler; Jenny M. Sullivan Hellgren, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2013, p. 233-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The English Department at Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden, participates in a distance-learning program with the Faculty of Education at Vietnam National University. Students who enroll in this program are teachers of English at secondary or tertiary institutions, and will study half time for two years to complete a Master’s degree in English Linguistics. The distance program, adapted specifically to accommodate the Vietnamese students in terms of cultural differences as well as inexperience with distance methodology, is characterized by three design features: testing, technical training, and fostering a community of learners. The design of the courses also reflects a learner-centered approach that addresses common problem areas in distance education by promoting interactivity. Central to the overall program is the maintenance of different channels of communication, reflecting an effort to support the students academically and socially, both as individuals and members of a learning community. In this way, the effects of physical and cultural distances are minimized.

  • 8. Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    A sociolinguistic analysis of swear word offensiveness2007Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    English-language swearing as humor in Swedish comic strips2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 121, p. 175-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate the Swedish, non-native use of English swear words in Swedish-language comic strips. I first consider the established relationships between both swearing and humor, and comics and humor. I propose that swear word usage and the comic strip framework contribute to a mutual feedback loop, whereby the comic strip derives its humor from the use of English swear words, while at the same time the comic strip context, by invoking a play frame, primes the swear word usage for humorous interpretation. Modeling Siegel (1995), I then consider how a code-switch to English serves as a framing device or contextualization cue for humor in Swedish-language contexts. The analysis of a selection of Swedish comic strips draws from the Encryption Theory of Humor (Flamson and Barrett, 2008), and suggests that humor created via the Swedish practice of swearing in English is a function of shared background knowledge that capitalizes on the fundamental incongruity of two discourse systems operating under different norms of appropriateness.

  • 10.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    FUCK CANCER, Fucking Åmål, Aldrig fucka upp: The standardisation of fuck in Swedish media2017In: Advances in Swearing Research: New languages and new contexts / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten and Karyn Stapleton, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 65-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Universität des Saarlandes.
    Hesitations and repair in German2005In: Proceedings of DiSS'05, Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech Workshop, 2005, p. 71-76Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    Intertextual quotation: References to media in family interaction2012In: The Appropriation of Media in Everyday Life: What People Do with Media / [ed] Ayass, Ruth; Gerhardt, Cornelia, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012, p. 79-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Introduction: The linguist's view of Television2016In: Watching TV with a Linguist / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2016, 1, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    På svenska svär vi gärna på engelska2018In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Saarland University.
    [Review of:] Tony McEnery, Swearing in English. Bad Language, Purity and Power from 1586 to the Present2006In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 542-545Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Spritsnack: Samspelet mellan alkohol och samtal i den tecknade serien Rocky.2017In: Spiritus, ISSN 1404-465X, Vol. Webbpublikation, p. 15 s.-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    The use of English in the Swedish-language comic Rocky2012In: Linguistics and the study of comics / [ed] Bramlett, Frank, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, p. 239-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Watching TV with a Linguist2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, English language.
    Who's Swearing Now?: The Social Aspects of Conversational Swearing2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Who’s Swearing Now? represents an investigation of how people actually swear, illustrated by a collection of over 500 spontaneous swearing utterances along with their social and linguistic contexts. The book features a focus on the use of eight swear words: ass, bitch, cunt, damn, dick, fuck, hell, shit and their possible inflections or derivations, e.g., asshole or motherfucker, offering a solution to the controversial issue of defining swear words and swearing by limiting the investigation to the core set of words most common to previous swearing studies. The specific focus results in accurate depictions of contextualized swearing utterances. Precise frequency counts are thus enabled which, along with offensiveness ratings of contextualized and non-contextualized swearing, enable a clarification of The Swearing Paradox, referring to the phenomenon of frequently used swear words also being those which traditionally are judged to be the most offensive.

    The book revisits the relationship between gender and swear word usage, but considers the distribution based on the core subset of swear words, revealing similarities where others have claimed differences. Significantly, Who’s Swearing Now? considers the aspect of race with regards to swear word usage, and reveals behavioral differences between, for example, White and African American males and females with regards to word preferences as well as social impetuses for and effects of swearing. Questionnaire and interview data supplement the swearing utterances, revealing participants’ individual credos about their own use or non-use of swear words and, interestingly, about others’ allowed or ideally prohibited use of swear words. These sets of data present thought-provoking and often entertaining statements regarding the unwritten set of rules governing swearing behavior. Who’s Swearing Now? concludes with close analyses of four recent and highly publicized incidences of public swear word usage, considered in light of the spontaneous swearing utterances, speaker and addressee variables such as gender, race and age, and perceptions of offensiveness and propriety.

  • 20.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Stapleton, KarynUlster University.
    Advances in swearing research: New languages and new contexts2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Any behavior that arouses, as swearing does, controversy, disagreement, disdain, shock, and indignation as often as it imbues passion, sincerity, intimacy, solidarity, and jocularity should be an obvious target of in-depth scholarship. Rigorous, scholarly investigation of the practice of swearing acknowledges its social and cultural significance, and allows us to discover and better understand the historical, psychological, sociological, and linguistic aspects (among others) of swearwords and swearword usage. The present volume brings together a range of themes and issues central to the existing knowledge of swearing and considers these in two key ‘new’ arenas, that is, in languages other than English, and/or in contexts and media other than spoken interaction. Many of the chapters analysed are based on large and robust collections of data, such as corpora or questionnaire responses, which allow for patterns of swearing to emerge. In other chapters, personally observed instances of swearing comprise the focus, allowing for a close analysis of the relationship between sociolinguistic context and pragmatic function. In each chapter, the cultural aspects of swearing are considered, ultimately affirming the importance of the study of swearing, and further establishing the legitimacy of swearing as a target of research.

  • 21.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Stapleton, Karyn
    Ulster University.
    Introduction: Swearing research as variations on a theme2017In: Advances in Swearing Research: New languages and new contexts / [ed] Kristy Beers Fägersten and Karyn Stapleton, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Bellander, T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Landqvist, Mats
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Becoming the expert constructing health knowledge in epistemic communities online2018In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a discourse analytic framework, the article analyses health blogs and patient’s forum discussions in which parents to children with congenital heart defects recontextualize medical professional knowledge and share their own experiences. The study show how the two types of online media may serve as a means for parents to attain expert status in their own case by sharing lay knowledge expressed as an amalgamation of the two key perspectives–professional and experienced–as an indivisible unit. Monological discourses, such as narrating, in blogs and more direct and immediate responses in forum discussions are noted as examples of differences in how medical facts are explained and negotiated, how advice is provided and how patient expertise is created. The study also show how blogs and especially forum discussions are used to problematize the validity of actions and opinions of medical staff. The role of developing patient expertise in epistemic communities online may therefore come with a risk of spreading misrepresentation of medical cases. 

  • 23.
    Bellander, Theres
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Karlsson, Anna-Malin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Blogging as a Health Literacy Practice: Identity construction and knowledge-building in the writing of parents of children with heart defect2018In: Explorations in Ethnography, Language and Communication: Capturing linguistic and cultural diversities / [ed] Stina Hållsten & Zoe Nikolaidou, Södertörns högskola, 2018, p. 127-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Bellander, Theres
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Nikolaidou, Zoe
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Building health knowledge online: Parents’ online information searching on congenital heart defects2017In: Literacy and Numeracy Studies: An international journal in the education and training of adults, ISSN 1441-0559, E-ISSN 1839-2903, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 4-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines online searching as a digital health literacy practice and focuses on parents of children with congenital heart defects. Over the period of four years, we have conducted interviews with couples at different stages of pregnancy or parenthood and have encouraged them to reflect on their literacy practices when receiving a heart defect diagnosis, during the remaining time of their pregnancy and when living with a child with a heart defect. We have also read and analysed health blogs written by parents and focused on extracts where literacy events are described. Searching for information and support online is one of the most frequent practices amongst the participants in the study. The aim of this paper is therefore to highlight the complexity of looking for information online in order to take health decisions and provide care to a child with congenital illness. Based on what parents say they do when searching online, we focus on three main paths to knowledge: looking for medical facts, looking for other parents’ experiences and looking for practical information. We discuss digital health literacy practices as complex activities that often involve parents in the diagnosis and in the child’s medical care to such an extent that parents build up knowledge and become experts, not only in finding information and support but in talking and writing about their child’s illness. We also problematise the notion of trustworthy health information and show how facts and opinions often go hand in hand in platforms where health issues are discussed. Finally, we show some of the affordances and restrictions inherent in using the internet as a source for meaning making and learning about children’s health. The results reinforce our understanding of the socially framed nature of health literacy and make us focus on the digital as an additional important aspect in the practice of health literacy.

  • 25.
    Bergdahl, Lovisa
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education.
    Crisis or Struggle?: A Language of Natality as a Struggle for Education2017In: Studier i Pædagogisk Filosofi, ISSN 2244-9140, E-ISSN 2244-9140, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 25-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking its point of departure in the connotations to war and violence inherent in what is here called the ‘language of crisis’ (Jantzen), the purpose of this article is to explore what it might mean to reassess the language of educational change and policy reform in the imagery of natality and birth (Arendt). If the task in a ‘crisis’ is to fight against the crisis, effectively and forcefully, the argument of the paper is that the root metaphors of natality and birth puts into play an imagery that makes possible a relational language for educational change and reform. If the language we use has performative consequences, the question explored is what a ‘language of natality’ can make possible as a language of struggle for education.

  • 26.
    Curtis, Hugh
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education.
    ’she bes delighted with herself’: Habitual marking in Irish English2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The habitual aspect has been a feature of Irish English for centuries. How it has evolved may have had a lot to do with contact between Standard English and the Celtic language, Irish, spoken in Ireland. As time passes does the impact which these two languages have had on each other weaken? How has a major feature of Irish English, the habitual aspect, fared in the digital world? This essay executes some digital detective work and finds that habitual markers do be always there…

  • 27. De Geer, Boel
    Ett andra förstaspråk: utlandsadopterade barns svenska språkutveckling under småbarnsåren1997In: Från joller till läsning och skrivning / [ed] Boel De Geer, Ragnhild Söderbergh, Malmö: Gleerup , 1997, p. 146-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28. De Geer, Boel
    Internationally Adopted Children in Communication: A Developmental Study1992Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 29. De Geer, Boel
    The Boys from Colombia: A Study of the Language Switching Process of Internationally Adopted Children - The First Three Months After Adoption1990Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 30. De Geer, Boel
    The language switching process of internationally adopted children1991In: The third Nordic Child Language Symposium: Oulu, 7-8 December 1990: symposiumraportti / [ed] Eila Alahuhta, Oulu: Oulun yliopisto , 1991, p. 149-158Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31. De Geer, Boel
    Who takes whom?: Response-Analysis of mother-child interaction1991In: Lund Working Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 1652-0017, Vol. 38, p. 29-44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32. De Geer, Boel
    Who's got the model?: Problems in analyzing mother-child communication in dyads with internationally adopted children1988In: Lund Working Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 1652-0017, Vol. 33, p. 65-76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    De Geer, Boel
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    Malmbjer, AnnaSödertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    Språk på tvärs: rapport från ASLA:s höstsymposium, Södertörn, 11-12 november 20042004Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    De Geer, Boel
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Swedish language.
    Tulviste, Tiia
    Södertörn University College, Avdelning 3, Swedish language.
    Behavior regulation in the family context in Estonia and Sweden2002In: Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, ISSN 1018-2101, E-ISSN 2406-4238, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 329-346Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    De Geer, Boel
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language.
    Tulviste, Tiia
    Södertörn University, School of Discourse Studies, Swedish language. Univesity of Tartu, Estonia .
    Mizera, Luule
    Regulation of behavior and attention in Estonian, Finnish, and Swedish peer interaction2005In: Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, ISSN 1018-2101, E-ISSN 2406-4238, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    De Geer, Boel
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 3, Swedish language.
    Tulviste, Tiia
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Mizera, Luule
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Tryggvason, Marja
    Södertörn University.
    Socialization in communication: Pragmatic socialization during dinnertime in Estonian, Finnish and Swedish families2002In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 1757-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Djupfeldt, Kajsa
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.
    Rökning dödar vem?: En språkvetenskaplig studie kring de grammatiska och semiotiska resursernas skapande av förutsättningar för förståelse av orsak och verkan i hälsovarningar på svenska  cigarettpaket år 2014-2016.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study attempts to answer three questions regarding how health warnings that adorn Swedish cigarette packages affects the consumer on a grammatical and a semiotic level. To investigate this, the health warnings has been analysed in order to identify the grammatical and semiotic components impact on the coniditons for the messages to influence the recipicent. By examining two different designs of health warnings from the tobacco directive from 2014 and 2016, and to take part in a focus groups opinions, this study revealed different factors that enable or limit the consumer to perceive and embrace that which is conveyed in these specific health warnings.

  • 38.
    Dvorak, Martin
    Högskolan Dalarna,.
    Fear Induction, Versatile Wide-Coverage Taints, Semantic Polarity and Semantic Association as Means of Persuasion in Religious Discourse2012In: International Symposium on Language and Communication: Research trends and challenges: Proceedings book, Izmir, Turkey: Institute of Language and Communication Studies , 2012, p. 497-509Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear occupies an undeniable portion of our lives and in most cases represents an incentive and driving force underlying our acts. The paper looks into discursive practices of generating fear through direct intimidation and by overemphasizing and/or fabricating versatile wide-coverage taints (reader’s/listener’s imperfections and flaws) deployed for the purpose of inducing feelings of guilt and insufficiency. It also tackles the issue of semantic polarity (juxtaposing two stylistically more or less identical but semantically opposing blocks of text) discussing its impact on the message recipient and the concepts it endeavors to establish in them in order to influence their future choices and conduct. Attention is also paid to semantic association, which proves to be another intimidating technique frequently utilized in religious discourse to supercharge selected lexical items with the meanings the writer/speaker purposefully attaches to these, thereby exploiting excessive signification (in the Saussurean sense) to achieve their intended persuasive effect.The paper, which is based on the author’s research and analysis of a corpus of religious texts, illustrates the individual phenomena by presenting examples selected from sources used by several denominations and religious movements (Christians, Latter-Day Saints, Jehova’s Witnesses, Satanists, Scientologists, etc.). Besides, it statistically maps the distribution of direct intimidation and versatile wide-coverage taints segments across these sources and points out the recent trends in persuasive mechanisms deployed to induce a change of individual’s opinion and/or behavior.

  • 39.
    Dvorak, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    I Have Read the Chapters, But I Do Not Remember: Factors Affecting Intake, Retention and Recall of New Information Among Swedish University Students2016In: INTED2016 Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, Valencia, Spain: IATED Academy , 2016, p. 504-509Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affluence of information sources we currently experience due to economic prosperity of western cultures and modern information technologies seems to have, apart from its positive effects associated with the ready availability of information, some negative ones as well. These seem to be related to the counterproductive way students utilize these sources, which, in some cases, may hinder their progress, reduce the efficiency of the overall educational process, and render teachers frustrated due to their students not coming prepared to their seminars.

    Besides looking into factors affecting intake, retention and recall of new information among Swedish university students, which appear to be directly associated with the scarcity principle and perceived value of the information sources the students use, the paper also discusses their inability to deploy relevant cognitive and metacognitive strategies in the process of learning, the impact of exposure to a certain assessment, learning and grading culture, as well as possible solutions to the issue.

  • 40.
    Dvorak, Martin
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation.
    Intimidation, Versatile Wide-Coverage Taints, Semantic Polarity and Semantic Association as Elements Facilitating Religious Persuasion2013In: Language and Communication Quarterly, ISSN 2168-7633, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear occupies an undeniable portion of our lives and in most cases represents an incentive and driving force underlying our acts. The paper looks into discursive practices of generating fear through direct intimidation and by overemphasizing and/or fabricating versatile wide-coverage taints (reader’s/listener’s imperfections and flaws) deployed for the purpose of inducing feelings of guilt and insufficiency. It also tackles the issue of semantic polarity (juxtaposing two stylistically more or less identical but semantically opposing blocks of text) discussing its impact on the message recipient and the concepts it endeavors to establish in them in order to influence their future choices and conduct. Attention is also paid to semantic association, which proves to be another intimidating technique frequently utilized in religious discourse to supercharge selected lexical items with the meanings the writer/speaker purposefully attaches to these, thereby exploiting excessive signification (in the Saussurean sense) to achieve their intended persuasive effect.

    The paper, which is based on the author’s research and analysis of a corpus of religious texts, illustrates the individual phenomena by presenting examples selected from sources used by several denominations and religious movements (Christians, Latter-Day Saints, Jehova’s Witnesses, Satanists, Scientologists, etc.). Besides, it statistically maps the distribution of direct intimidation and versatile wide-coverage taints segments across these sources and points out the recent trends in persuasive mechanisms deployed to induce a change of individual’s opinion and/or behavior.

  • 41.
    Dvorak, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
    Magnetic Book as a Recyclable Tool Used for Teaching a Foreing Language and Incorporating Principles of Language Acquisition Theories2014In: International conference The Future of Education, Florence, Italy, 12-13 June, 2014, 4th ed., Padova, Italy: Libreria Universitaria, 2014, p. 324-328Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching English to children at an early age does not only prepare a breeding ground for early bilingualism/multilingualism but also facilitates language learning at later stages. The early introduction of English in the curricula of primary schools, which has recently become topical throughout Europe, also calls for the introduction of language-teaching methodology suitable for very young learners. Although there is currently a wide range of material parents and teachers have at their disposal that can assist them in improving their children’s and pupils’ linguistic potential, its amount may sometimes seem quite overwhelming. This can make the choice of the right activity rather complicated and thus the need for language-teaching aids that can be recycled several times arises.

    The paper focuses on practical examples of how a magnetic book can be used repeatedly to develop a young child’s language skills in their mother tongue or a second language and what methodology can be deployed in this respect that incorporates some of the principles of language acquisition theories. Special attention is being paid to behaviorism, Chomsky’s ideas, Vygotsky’s and Piaget’s interactionist approaches (fostering Zone of Proximal Development and Scaffolding), and connectionism as well as how these can be put into operation when one is working with the book.

  • 42.
    Dvorak, Martin
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Means of Increasing Credibility in Religious Discourse2013In: Language and Communication Quarterly, ISSN 2168-7641, Vol. 2, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper looks into discursive practices of increasing credibility of a message and its source deployed in religious discourse for the purpose of boosting its persuasive potential. It is based on author’s research and analysis of a corpus of religious texts and illustrates the use of credibility boosters by presenting examples selected from sources of several denominations and religious movements (Christians, Latter-Day Saints, Jehova’s Witnesses, United Christian Action, etc.). Besides, it statistically maps the distribution of credibility boosters across four samples used by Judaism and Christianity, Church of Latter-Day Saints, Heaven’s Gate, and Church of Scientology. It also points out recent trends in some of the persuasive mechanisms deployed to induce a change of individual’s opinion and/or behavior.

  • 43.
    Dvorák, Martin
    Masaryk University, Brno.
    Attention Boosters in ESP Lectures2006In: LSP in Higher Education, Searching for Common Solutions, Brno, 2006, p. 68-70Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To prove successful, language teaching requires a great deal of students’ participation in the process. However, students’ attention, a pre-requisite for such participation, tends to gradually wane as the lesson proceeds – a phenomenon that becomes yet more marked at lectures due to these not requiring listeners’ active involvement.The paper focuses on the means and techniques of keeping students attentive at ESP lectures (whose primary purpose is to acquaint them with IT-related vocabulary and advanced grammar structures) such as message encryption and decryption, use of metaphors, deviation from the expected, incorporation of grammar in the relevant socio-cultural context, etc.

  • 44.
    Dvorák, Martin
    Masaryk University, Brno.
    ESP and Automated Large-Scale Testing2007In: Profilingua 2007: sbornik prispevku z konference, Pilsen, 2007, p. 6-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the nature of most university examinations, students often tend to concentrate their preparation efforts into a one-off act. This approach, however, proves ineffective when it comes to languages. The author introduced a method of regular testing that boosts the efficiency of English-teaching process in that it makes students prepare on a regular basis and minimizes the burden of handling numerous tests submitted in every round. The paper discuses the methodology of systematic computerized testing by means of answer sheets whose contents can be scanned and automatically evaluated.

  • 45.
    Dvorák, Martin
    Masaryk University, Brno.
    Internet Language Teaching, Production of Electronic Teaching Material2002In: Odborny jazyk v procesu evropske integrace, Prague, 2002, p. 40-43Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper tackles the issue of language teaching by means of language-based Internet websites paying particular attention to teaching the language for specialized purposes. It foreshadows the potential of Internet to function as a supplementary source of language information and training as well as that of self-contained material which is capable of covering virtually every area of language learning - grammar, spelling, specialized expressions, pronunciation etc. The emphasis is laid on how all the above mentioned categories can be combined and harmonized to produce concise worksheets targeting specific areas (biology, medicine, computer science etc.), their specialized terminology and merits of working with such material.The demonstration of samples of worksheets, tests and pronunciation exercises represents a major part of the paper. All these utilize web design (HTML, CGI scripts, JAVA scripts) and common methods of Internet audio transfer to meet the modern learner's language needs. The paper is given in English.

  • 46.
    Dvorák, Martin
    Masaryk University, Brno.
    Language Acquisition in a Toddler and Factors Affecting its Speed2008In: Sociokulturni kompetence ve vyuce cizich jazyku, Praha, 2008, p. 5 s.-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper focuses on the factors affecting the speed at which a toddler acquires language, chiefly new expressions and collocations. A special attention is paid to the individual functions of the child’s early language as described by M.A. K. Halliday (instrumental, regulatory, interactional, etc.) and the situations determining these. It also aims to point out idiosyncrasies of the acquisition process in terms of the infant’s exposure to two different languages – a major one (spoken by most of the members of the infant’s community) and the minor one (spoken by one of his/her parents only). Besides the theoretical background, the paper presents author’s practical examples and authentic recordings.

  • 47.
    Dvorák, Martin
    Masaryk University, Brno.
    Language Acquisition in an Infant: Role of Context2009In: Janua linguarum reserata: linvisticke, lingvodidakticke a literarni reflexe pro nove milenium, Pilsen, 2009, p. 14-20Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper focuses on the role different kinds of context (situational, physical, social, and linguistic) play in the development of infant's language during its individual stages (cooing, babbling, word and sentence formation) and attempts to delineate those contextual factors that the author considers most fruitful in the language acquisition process. Some attention is also paid to the peculiarities of bilingual upbringing such as language games the child himself/herself invents in the context of two languages (Czech vs. English) and calque creation. The paper lists numerous examples and its presentation is accompanied by audio and video material collected during research.

  • 48.
    Dvorák, Martin
    Masaryk University, Brno.
    Practicing English Grammar by Means of Electronic Drilling Exercises2003In: Sbornik prispevku z konference Profilingua 2003, Dobra Voda, 2003, p. 20-22Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Language drills aimed at practising grammatical phenomena function as a useful tool utilized to serve language-teaching purposes. Besides, they turn out to be a convenient utility when it comes to practising and revising the already acquired grammar and vocabulary. However, trying to invent new sentences containing a particular grammatical phenomenon or vocabulary of a certain lexical stratum repetitively, the teacher may find themselves exhausted and frustrated. The electronic drilling exercises can represent an asset in this respect. The paper tackles the issue of usage as well as production of electronic drilling exercises which, after becoming public by being posted on an Internet site, provide the teacher with a powerful tool. Their pros and cons are mentioned and an electronic drill sample presented.

  • 49.
    Ekeroth, Veronica
    Södertörn University College, Lärarutbildningen.
    Skolans organisering och pedagogiska arbete med svenska som andraspråk: ur ett lärarperspektiv2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that students with another mother tongue than Swedish terminate elementary school with lower grades in all subjects, compared to students having Swedish as a mother tongue. This fact justifies further research on the forms of teaching Swedish as a second language. Attention has been given to the fact that the students with another mother tongue than Swedish have to cope with "dual learning". Parallel to the learning of a second language they need to obtain knowledge in all other subjects. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how the School organise the work with students having another mother tongue than Swedish, and to find out how teachers in other subjects solve the problem of having students that struggle with "dual learning". The questions I will be answering in this paper is:

    1. How do the school organise the teaching of students having Swedish as second language (SVA-students), when in comes to improving language skills and obtaining knowledge?
    2. How has this particular organisation affected the work of teachers in other subjects?
    3. Which are the advantages and disadvantages of this form to organise the work and teaching, according to the teachers involved?

    The method used in the investigation is "qualitative deep interviews". The theoretical points of departure are Haug’s concepts of "excluding integration" and "including integration". In this analysis I have furthermore used organisational theories like "the learning of organisations" and the "learning cycle" from Kolb. In the didactical analysis I have used "theories of writing" from various authors and "theories of language" from Vygotskij.

    The result of the investigation shows that the investigated school gone from "excluding integration" to "including integration". Nowadays the responsibility for SVA-students are distributed among all teachers in the school, implying a substantial changes in the role of teachers. The role of the SVA-teachers has also developed simultaneously into something which could be described as tutor or mentor to teachers of the other subjects. The positive and clear response from the school management to these initiatives has also been of great significance. In this process the book "Schaffholding Language – Schaffholding Learning" of Pauline Gibbon has played an important role and has lead to the continuous training and development of methods at the school.

  • 50.
    Ekström, Andrea
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Teacher Education.
    Foreign language communication anxiety in correlation to the sociolinguistic variables gender, age, performance and multilingual competence: A linguistic pilot study of Swedish students’ attitudes2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This data-driven linguistic study investigates if levels of different types of foreign language communication anxiety, such as for speaking, listening, writing and/or reading that Swedish students in compulsory school (grades 7-9) and upper secondary school experience when communicating in English in their foreign language classes have any correlation to sociolinguistic variables such as gender, age, performance and/or multilingual competence. The compiled and analyzed self-report data have successfully provided a base for implied correlations between the different sociolinguistic variables and language anxiety. The most prominent indications of correlation to anxiety are the variables gender, performance (course grades) and linguistic competence. The age variable also showed indications of correlation but was less pronounced than the others. It was also found that students generally feel more and/or higher anxiety when speaking the target language than the other types of communication. The didactic implications that this study contributes to is that “communicating” as an activity conducted in the foreign language classroom needs to be further defined and broken down into specific types of skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) and also be approached accordingly. This also implies that further research is needed to thoroughly examine the correlational effects different sociolinguistic variables have on the foreign language learning. 

123 1 - 50 of 117
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf