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  • 1.
    Abiala, Kristina
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.
    "Som en i familjen": invandrade kvinnor i turkiska hushåll2013In: Arbete & Jämställdhet: Förändringar under femtio år / [ed] Eva Blomberg, Kirsti Niskanen, Stockholm: SNS Förlag , 2013, p. 133-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Antoniou, Vasilia Lilian
    Univestiy of Essex, UK.
    David E. Sutton's Memories Cast in Stone: The Relevance of the Past in Everyday Life2001In: Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans, ISSN 1461-3190, E-ISSN 1469-963X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 212-213Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bodén, Daniel
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    Från vällingklocka till minutjakt: Övervakning och styrning av arbetet från dagsverken till gigekonomi2023Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our society claims to protect individual freedom, but freedom ends every time we clock in. Never before have employers been able to control their employees in such detail. But the desire to control workers runs like a common thread throughout history. In this book, ethnologist Daniel Bodén applies a social-historical perspective to contemporary discussions about surveillance in the workplace. He examines the technologies that have been used to increasingly control work and what consequences the development has had. The result is a pithy story about Sweden's economic transformations from the late 18th century to today, about mistrust and about an increasing chase for productivity.

  • 4.
    Bodén, Daniel
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology.
    The future of creative work– creativity and digital disruption2021In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 848-851Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Gallardo-Fernandez, Gloria L.
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Saunders, Fred
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    “Before we asked for permission, now we only give notice”: Women’s entrance into artisanal fisheries in Chile2018In: Maritime Studies, ISSN 1872-7859, E-ISSN 2212-9790, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 177-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-scale fisheries (SSF) in the Global South are increasingly subjected to the internationalisation of food systems. Guided by a feminist political ecology approach, we examine how gender relations and power structures within SSF are changing through policy interventions and market linkages. Chilean women working in SSF have traditionally been unregistered direct producers. Since the early 2000s, however, women have formally entered as fishers within this hitherto male-dominated space. Today, women constitute almost a quarter of artisanal fishers in Chile. While women have become more visible, among others, in their engagement in territorial use rights in fisheries (TURFs), little research attention has been paid to women’s roles within SSF. We redress this shortfall by examining the struggle to obtain TURFs by an all-women seaweed gatherers union in Coliumo (Bio-Bio Region, Chile). Using participatory research tools, we describe key gendered interactions and events over a local struggle for resources. Our findings show how closely related episodes of cooperation and conflict were involved in realising TURFs, which included differently-gendered relationships. While the women implicated in formalising fishing entitlements accrued individual benefit and enhanced their collective standing, the conflict left a deep scar among women in the community.

    Download full text (pdf)
    GallardoSaunders2018
  • 6.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Transparency and legibility in international institutions: The UN Global Compact and post-political global ethics2011In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 378-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines the organisational production and distribution of normatively charged ideas for governing transnational business. Based on the United Nations Global Compact Initiative, it is argued that the UN version of ‘corporate social responsibility’ (CSR) builds on a metanarrative of rationality, involving ideals of transparency and legibility combined with an emphasis on consensus and harmony. The strong accent on partnership, agreement and dialogue leaves little space for the involved parties to articulate and defend diverging interests. By transforming what are basically political conflicts of interest into win–win terms, CSR standards and the technologies of transparency, legibility, and accountability foreclose conflictual space, and emerge as an instance of ‘post-political global ethics’.

  • 7.
    Gaunt, David
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Kulturell och social olikhet2013In: Socialgerontologi / [ed] Lars Andersson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2 uppd. uppl., p. 93-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Handlar om hur synen på äldre människor varierar genom historien och mellan olika kulturer. Kapitlet är en del av en lärobok.

  • 8.
    Granqvist, Kimmo
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Education. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Critical evaluation of Romani inclusion strategies in Finland and Sweden2021In: Journal of Contemporary European Studies, ISSN 1478-2804, E-ISSN 1478-2790, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the status of the Romani in Swedish and Finnish societies. The article scrutinises the history and current state of Romani policies in Sweden and Finland, critically evaluating the state of the art of Romani inclusion and comparing approaches of the two countries. The also reviews research on Romani inclusion. In 2012, Sweden adopted a coordinated 20-year strategy for Romani inclusion (2012–2032). Finland adopted the First National Policy on the Romani in 2009, and the second National Policy on the Romani entered into force on 1 January 2018 and will run until 2022.

  • 9.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Mattering Kinship: Inheritance, biology and egg donation, between genetics and epigenetics2016In: Critical Kinship Studies / [ed] Charlotte Krolokke, Lene Myong, Stine W. Adrian, Tine Tjornhoj-Thomsen, London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016, 1, p. 33-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hübinette, Tobias
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Education.
    Constructing a global Koreanness: Representations of adopted Koreans and the Korean diaspora2010In: Proceedings of the second International Symposium on Korean Adoption Studies / [ed] Kim Park Nelson, Tobias Hübinette, Eleana Kim, Jennifer Kwon Dobbs, Kim Langrehr & Lene Myong, Seoul: IKAA Publishing , 2010, p. 175-193Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Kostera, Monika
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Business Studies. University of Warsaw, Poland; Université Paris-Saclay, LITEM, France.
    Krzyworzeka, P.
    Kozminski University, Poland.
    How to be an ethnographer2023Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Offering a practical guide on How to be an Ethnographer, this book will be a valuable resource for advanced students and early career researchers of organization studies, anthropology and sociology. It will also be a useful introduction to scholars exploring ethnography as a new research method. This book explores the aims, main methods, and ethical and methodological standards of ethnography. Placing human beings at the centre, it showcases why ethnography is a valuable method of research. Highlighting the importance of ethnographic engagement as a means to learn about different ways of being human, the book employs a range of case studies from researchers at all career stages to provide examples of different methods used in research projects. Going beyond tools and techniques, the authors discuss moral and methodological principles as well as community related modes that are important in conducting ethnography. 

  • 12.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Stockholms universitet.
    Retorno de los Runakuna: Cotacachi y Otavalo2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [es]

    En 1996 el movimiento político Pachakutik –asociado a la confederación indígena CONAIE- participó electoralmente por primera vez y desde entonces el movimiento indígena se ha establecido como una importante fuerza a nivel local, entre otros, en Cotacachi y Otavalo. Estos dos cantones se identifican como la cuna intelectual del movimiento indígena ecuatoriano. En este libro se analiza el proceso político local desde las perspectivas indígenas, principalmente durante el período entre 1996 y 2010. Un enfoque principal está en lo que el autor denomina el dilema intercultural del movimiento indigena, es decir, los desafíos político-electorales asociados a la interculturalidad y las alianzas establecidas más allá de la definición étnica.  Igualmente se problematizan analíticamente las implicaciones de los avances del movimiento político del Presidente Rafael Correa a partir de 2006 dentro del movimiento indígena. Asimismo, se examina el faccionalismo dentro de las organizaciones indígenas en Cotacachi y Otavalo. A través del análisis de las percepciones e interpretaciones por parte de los actores indígenas, se intenta captar la dinámica y las tensiones dentro de esta complejidad al nivel cantonal. Es extremadamente importante ofrecer espacio académico a los protagonistas políticos. Por ende, metodológicamente, se incluye una gran cantidad de entrevistas con los actores. La segunda parte del libro consiste en una selección de 16 conversaciones entre el autor y destacados personajes indígenas, entre otros, los tres alcaldes protagonistas del estudio; Auki Tituaña y Alberto Anrango en Cotacachi, así como Mario Conejo en Otavalo, lo que por sí contribuye a llenar un vacío de documentación académica del movimiento indígena ecuatoriano y la historia política local.

    Rickard Lalander es politólogo, Doctor y Catedrático en Estudios Latinoamericanos, investigador y profesor en las universidades de Helsinki y  Estocolmo. Es investigador asociado de la Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar, Quito. En Ecuador ha colaborado con la FLACSO, el Centro Andino de Acción Popular/CAAP y la Escuela de Gobierno y Políticas Públicas para las Nacionalidades y Pueblos del Ecuador/ESGOPP. Es autor de Suicide of the Elephants? Venezuelan Decentralization between Partyarchy and Chavismo (2004), editor y co-autor de Política y Sociedad en la Venezuela del Chavismo (2006) y ha publicado ampliamente sobre la democracia en los países andinos, inclusive varios artículos sobre el movimiento indígena ecuatoriano.

  • 13.
    Lundén, Thomas
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    The nation - that's us?: Divergent interpretations of a concept2019In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. XII, no 4, p. 13-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of nation is not only, as is often assumed, related to states but to the people who feel that they belong to a community based on a common identity, wherein language and culture are often emphasized as something that knit people together. History, as well as contemporary experience, reveal the notion that state nationalism tends to oppress local languages and cultures. However, in a cultural nation interpretation, all national minorities, while being citizens of their state of domicile, are per definition not members of the majority nationality. By claiming membership of the minority, individuals are given exclusive rights such as protection of customs, language and religion while, of course, being free to choose either assimilation or a combination of both. One dilemma of cultural nationalism is the relationship between autochthonous minorities and immigrant groups. Among individuals with a possible otherness in relation to the nationalized state is their choice of identity: otherness, total assimilation into the majority, or a twin identity. Nationality is not a digital attribute – identities can be split and shared in multiple ways – a conclusion which is argued for in this article.

  • 14. Normark, Maria
    Transforming field observations into functions: on the use of an ethnographic study in the design processManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ohm, Britta
    et al.
    Academy for the Popular Arts (hdpk), Berlin, Germany.
    Parthasarathi, Vibodh
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Introduction: Critical Explorations of Media Modernity in India2019In: Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 322-331Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    European University Institute.
    Civil society, un-civil society and the socialmovements2009In: Interface: a journal for and about social movements, E-ISSN 2009-2431, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 166-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the experience of civil society and social movements inCentral and Eastern Europe both before and after the events of 1989. It showshow the different paths to the development of "civil society" as an organisingconcept in the pre-1989 period impacted on experiences after that date, and relates this to broader theoretical debates on the concept. In particular, it argues that the movements of "un-civil society" often fulfil a more substantial political role than the NGOs of "civil society", for a range of reasons. Thearticle draws on a series of interviews conducted with "alter-globalisation" activists in the region

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Social movement or subculture?: Alterglobalists in Central and Eastern Europe2013In: Interface: a journal for and about social movements, E-ISSN 2009-2431, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 399-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the research on the alterglobalist, also known as the global justice, movement has focused on Western Europe and North America, with occasional research on other parts of the world. There has been little research done on this movement in the postsocialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe. This paper attempts to fill this gap by exploring the key events of the movement as well as the genealogy of grassroots social activism in the region. It offers insight into a movement that developed in a region that, due to its history, has been rather hostile to leftist ideologies and groups. This paper examines the development of the alterglobalist movement in the region and traces its inspirations and path dependencies. It also poses questions about the nature of the movement and ways to analyse it – whether as a politicized social movement or a subculture and lifestyle choice. The close connections of Central and Eastern European grassroots social movements to subcultures and counterculture might suggest a new and fresh perspective for studying social movements.

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    fulltext
  • 18.
    Porsani, Juliana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lalander, Rickard
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lehtilä, Kari
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lima Costa, Suzane
    UFBA - Federal University of Bahia, Brazil.
    da Conceição Carvalho, Jocimar
    IFBA – Federal Insitute of Education, Science, and Technology of Bahia, Brazil.
    Expressing and enacting decoloniality through indigenous tourism: Experiences from the Pataxó Jaqueira Reserve in Brazil2024In: Social Sciences and Humanities Open, ISSN 2590-2911, Vol. 9, article id 100859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the narratives expressed by the Pataxó indigenous people of Brazil within their indigenous tourism project, the “Jaqueira Reserve”. Our findings show that the indigenous people's role as protagonists in this setting foregrounds their voices, allowing them to retell and reposition themselves in history and to re-envision the future by presenting different ways of thinking and being. We contend that this Pataxó experience illustrates how decolonial endeavours are being crafted on an everyday basis in ways that strengthen indigenous cultural and environmental rights. Accordingly, we conclude that indigenous tourism has a transformational potential in the sense that it can counter the colonialization of mind and ideas and coloniality's violent oppression/exploitation of culture and nature. 

  • 19.
    Selling, Jan
    Södertörn University, Teacher Education, Critical Romani Studies.
    Romani liberation: a northern perspective on emancipatory struggles and progress2022Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Centered on the trajectory of the emancipation of Roma people in Scandinavia, Romani Liberation is a powerful challenge to the stereotype describing Romani as passive and incapable of responsibility and agency. The author also criticizes benevolent but paternalistic attitudes that center on Romani victimhood.

    The first part of the book offers a comprehensive overview of the chronological phases of Romani emancipation in Sweden and other countries. Underscoring the significance of Roma activism in this process, Jan Selling profiles sixty Romani activists and protagonists, including numerous original photos. The narrative is followed by an analysis of the concepts of historical justice and of the process of decolonizing Romani Studies. Selling highlights the impact of the historical contexts that have enabled or impeded the success of the struggles against discrimination and for equal rights, emphasizing Romani activism as a precondition for liberation.

    The particular Swedish framework is accentuated by a stimulating preface by the international activist Nicoleta Bitu, and afterwords by two prominent Romani advocates, the politician Soraya Post and the singer, author, and elder Hans Caldaras.

  • 20.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    Equitable Gender Participation in Local Water Governance: An Insight into Institutional Paradoxes2008In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 925-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of local stakeholders in governance of water resources is regarded as inalienable for ensuring efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability. To enhance gender balance in the water governance process, institutions are being designed and executed globally to elicit enhanced participation of women. This paper contends that in the context of local communities, the new institutional framework is divorced from the traditional social institutions that in turn operationalize their resource management systems. Based upon empirical evidence from rural Indian setting, the paper deciphers the paradoxes between the two sets of institutional paradigms and illustrates how these paradoxes at the ‘interface’ between the local community context and the development strategy lead to problems with effective women’s participation. On the basis of the findings, it argues that the institutional paradigm for achieving equitable gender participation in local water governance does not represent a truly ‘bottom-up’ approach. It further raises the concern that if the institutional paradigm for participation is contradictory to local institutions, then how can the objectives of participation founded thereupon be seen as achievable? The paper proposes the need to design participatory paradigms that are more realistically rooted in community-based institutional frameworks so as to enhance effectiveness of the endeavors.

  • 21.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    Indigenous Water Management Systems: Interpreting Symbolic Dimensions in Common Property Resource Regimes2006In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a natural resource subject to management in many small-scale societies as common property. A dominant approach to understanding the sustainability of such common property resource (CPR) management regimes is the rational action model, which assumes that their successful governance is achieved through collective action based on a rationally constructed set of working rules. By presenting a holistic study of indigenous water management system in small-scale community setting in India, this article argues that the relationship between water resources and society extends beyond a materialistic mundane relationship, to incorporate a “symbolic” orientation. It concludes that rooted in the cosmology of the society, the indigenous water management system represents a mechanism to reinforce the symbolic constructions and also to fulfill water-related needs that cut across material and nonmaterial realms. The outcomes of the article enhance the understanding of management of CPRs, adding an alternate perspective concerning beliefs and values associated with such resources.

  • 22.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, Sweden.
    Water resources Management in rural India: lessons from traditions for designing sustainable local action2008In: Journal of Resources, Energy and Development, ISSN 0975-7554, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 11-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a common pool resource, indispensable for human life and development. Consequently, the need for organizing its use in an efficient,effective, and sustainable manner is now recognized as paramount for ensuring sustainable development. Towards this end, a paradigmatic shift has been globally adopted with emphasis on designing co-management regimes rooted in community participation, India being no exception. It can be contended that despite this approach the newly designed water management regimes are alien, top-down, and universalistic with little or no concern and connections with the localized traditional WRM (water resources management) structures. Perhaps these assume that local communities either lack any operational resource management system or that the ones in practice are irrational, narrowly pragmatic, or in the process of disappearance. This paper examines the reality behind such assumptions through a holistic study of water management traditions in rural India. It demonstrates that rooted in the cosmology of society, the traditional regime enables collective action for management of water as a CPR (common property resource). The system continues to be enduring and vibrant, full of meaning and relevance for the practitioners. Finally, it urges the need to understand and makes suggestions for applying the knowledge to designing new 'co-management' based water management strategies proposed within the contemporary water policy context by building these upon existing localized traditional templates.

  • 23.
    Singh, Nandita
    Royal Instititue of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Women, Society and Water Technologies: Lessons for Bureaucracy2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 341-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water technologies are increasingly regarded as pivotal to the process of societal development. One arena of importance is the delivery of water to society through comprehensive water supply programs that aim at ensuring ‘safe’ water for all. The principal target group in these programs is women, whose development is believed to be promoted through improved water facilities offering them greater convenience, better health and enhanced socio-economic opportunities. These programs can be seen as having three essential aspects, namely technology, people and institutions. Of these, the responsibilities of designing technologies for supplying water, creating institutional frameworks for their execution and implementing the program at the people’s end for their benefit all lie with development bureaucracies. But the extent to which these bureaucracies can be sensitive to the socio-cultural contexts of the communities and the women for whom the program interventions are designed and implemented remains problematic. This article explores the gender dimensions of the socio-cultural context of water and how this may play a role in the adoption and management of improved water technologies. A perspective on the lessons for planning bureaucracies is offered to make the concerned technologies more efficient, effective and sustainable.

  • 24.
    Singh, Nandita
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Women’s Participation in Local Water Governance: Understanding Institutional Contradictions2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of women in local water governance is currently envisaged as necessary for achieving sustainable management of water resources. Towards this end, institutions are being created in many developing countries enabling the participation of local people in the use and management of resources. How effective is the participation of women as makers and shapers within local water governance institutions—and how does their participation translate into benefits for their communities? How realistic is this participatory strategy in the traditional rural contexts of the developing world? Based on empirical evidence from rural India, where women do not constitute a homogenous group, this article seeks to explore how social and power differences among them thwart the beneficial effects of water governance in communities. The findings underscore the need to develop a holistic understanding of the institutional factors that differentiate among women and the implications of these on mechanisms of water governance put in place at the local level.

  • 25. Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    Jacks, Gunnar
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    Women and Modern Domestic Water Supply Systems: Need for a Holistic Perspective2004In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 18, p. 237-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As domestic water managers, the strategic need of women has been identified as havingaccess to domestic water sources that are convenient, reliable and located close to home. The needhas been addressed through installation of low cost improved water supply systems in different partsof the developing world. While the need of women as domestic water managers has been globallyarticulated and addressed, perhaps adequate attention has not been drawn to the fact that this roleis actually performed within the context of local communities where domestic water managementactivities are built upon the users’ perceived needs to be fulfilled through culturally appropriatemeans. How do cultural intricacies in local communities influence the water fetching behaviour ofwomen? What is the impact of such factors on the adoption and utilization of modern domestic watersupply systems? The paper explores the implications of local cultural realities for the effectiveness ofhandpump as a modern domestic water supply system arguing that the locally perceived water needsof women are holistic and fail to be adequately addressed through the new source. Consequently, ithas been admitted only as an ‘add on’ source, thereby hindering achievement of the basic objectiveof bringing women greater comfort, better health and socio-economic empowerment.

  • 26.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, Sweden.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, Sweden.
    Women and community water supply programmes: An analysis from a socio-cultural perspective2005In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community water supply programmes are seen as instrumental in achieving the goal of ‘safe’ water for all. Women, aprincipal target group of these programmes, are to be benefited with greater convenience, enhanced socio-cultural oppor-tunities and better health for themselves and their families, provided through improved water facilities. Water supplyprogrammes largely consist of three essential components, namely: technology, people and institutions. Although suchprogrammes are intended to benefit women members of local communities, scant attention is paid to the impacts of thesocio-cultural context of the community on these programmes. This article explores the influence of social and culturalintricacies on the implementation of community water supply programmes, and assesses their effectiveness. The articleoffers important lessons for the design and implementation of this type of programme. It concludes that the local socio-cultural context sets the stage for programme implementation, being a dynamic factor that determines actual access to watersources, more so than mere physical availability, which is often used as a criterion for programme performance. The articlestresses the urgent need to integrate socio-cultural factors as a fourth dimension in designing community water supplyprogrammes, and suggests practical measures for enhancing the effectiveness of such programmes.

  • 27.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, Sweden.
    Singh, Om Prakash
    Anthropology of Water: Perspectives from Traditional Water Management Regime in Rural India2009In: Man in India, ISSN 0025-1569, Vol. 89, no 1-2, p. 215-228Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water a natural resource, is characterized by multitudes of traits which are distinctively processed by diversified thoughts and beliefs orienting the behaviour-patterns of the people. The present paper highlights the integrated inter-relation between water as a natural sources and human societies. Water works as an essence in human existence and at the sametime it in seen that this particular element of the environment has been specifically moulded by the social-cultural patterns of the people in such a way that it takes the principal role in governing the peoples sacred and secular mode of life-situation. In the perspective of this view-point an attempt has been made here to study the traditional water management system that are still prevalent in Indian villages. This study is engaged to explore the water management pattern in the background of socio-cultural and ritualistic traditions in the caste-oriented villages in Bihar and Madhya Pradesh. Day to day water use by the people and the associated values, norms and taboos open up such a unique dimension which can best be illustrated and analysed through the domain of anthropology of water.

  • 28.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Karriärkultur: Utbildningsindustrin och dess tidskonstruktioner i Indien2013In: Ymer, ISSN 0044-0477, Vol. 133, p. 109-134Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Karriärkultur
  • 29.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Stockholms universitet.
    Lucknow Daily: how a Hindi newspaper constructs society2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an anthropological study of journalists and their work. The setting is a north Indian city, and we shall meet reporters on their beats, searching for stories to print in Hindi dailies. By focusing on a profession that describes but is simultaneously inscribed in contemporary Indian society, the book attempts to discuss a professional practice in relation to processes of cultural globalisation, modernity and political imagination.

  • 30.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Lucknow: rebeller, byråkrater och kurtisaner i en undflyende stad2022In: Platser i världen: Tolv litterära besök / [ed] Nyqvist, Anette, Stockholm: Appell förlag , 2022, p. 90-108Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31. Ståhlberg, Per
    On the journalist beat in India: Encounters with the near familiar2006In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, E-ISSN 1741-2714, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 47-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns journalism as an object of anthropological study. It raises questions about how we should study an occupation that is so familiar in most places of the world. For example, how should we conceptualize newspaper journalism both as a globally diffused media form and as localized cultural practice? Furthermore, I discuss the relationship between the anthropologist and the journalist as two professionals that are equally engaged in producing representations and interpretations of culture and society. The study is based on fieldwork among Hindi-language journalists in Lucknow, India, as well as my own previous experience of local journalism in Sweden.

  • 32. Ståhlberg, Per
    På uppdrag med indiska journalister: när det välbekanta tränger sig på2004In: Antropologi/Journalistik: om sätt att beskriva världen / [ed] Ulf Hannerz, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2004, p. 37-59Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33. Ståhlberg, Per
    [Review of: ]Thomas Blom Hansen. 2001. Wages of Violence: Naming and Identity in Postcolonial Bombay. Princeton/Oxford: Princeton University Press.2004In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 558-559Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    The Jaipur Literature Festival and Its Critics: World Literature as Social Practice2019In: Anthropology and Humanism, ISSN 1559-9167, E-ISSN 1548-1409, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 54-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF) has been held in the Indian city of Jaipur for the past ten years. The event has grown spectacularly and has provided an arena for encounters between literary worlds. It has also become a focus of debate and friction within the sphere of Indian writing. This article is based on fieldwork at the JLF 2017.

  • 35. Ståhlberg, Per
    The Newspapers of Lucknow: Journalism and Modernity2003In: Social and political change in Uttar Pradesh: European perspectives / [ed] Roger Jeffrey och Jens Lerche, New Delhi: Manohar , 2003, p. 247-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Worlds in a tangle: The promotion of writing in India between the vernacular and the global2022In: Literature and the Making of the World: Cosmopolitan Texts, Vernacular Practices / [ed] Stefan Helgesson; Helena Bodin; Annika Mörte Alling, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2022, p. 249-279Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 37.
    Ståhlberg, Per
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Bolin, Göran
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
    Managing Meaning in Ukraine: Information, Communication, and Narration since the Euromaidan Revolution2023Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An in-depth look at Ukraine's attempts to shape how it is perceived by the rest of the world.

    During times of crisis, competing narratives are often advanced to define what is happening, and the stakes of information management by nations are high. In this timely book, Göran Bolin and Per Ståhlberg examine the fraught intersection of state politics, corporate business, and civil activism to understand the dynamics and importance of meaning management in Ukraine. Drawing on fieldwork inside the country, the authors discuss the forms, agents, and platforms within the complex political and communicative situation and how each articulated and acted upon perceptions of the propaganda threat.

    Bolin and Ståhlberg focus their analysis on the period between 2013 and 2022, when political tensions, commercial dynamics, and new communication technologies bred novel forms of information management. As they show, entities from governments and governmental administration to commercial actors, entrepreneurs, and activists formed new alliances in order to claim a stake in information policy. Bolin and Ståhlberg also explore how the various agents engaged in information management and strove to manage meaning in communication practice; the communicative tools they took advantage of; and the subsequent consequences for narrative constructions.

  • 38. Ståhlberg, Sabira
    et al.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    Södertörn University, School of Gender, Culture and History, Study of religions.
    Loplyk Fishermen Ecological Adaptation in the Taklamakan Desert2010In: Anthropos: Internationale Zeitschrift für Völker- und Sprachenkunde, ISSN 0257-9774, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 423-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Loplyks form a small ethnic group previously settled at the Lop Lake Lop Nor) in the Tarim Basin. With an economy based on fishing, this emi-nomadic Turkic group adapted to the arid conditions and scarce iological resources at the fringe of the Taklamakan desert. In the late ineteenth century, foreign travellers observed that they could fulfil ost of their material needs through the use of available plants, nimals, and fish species. Anthropogenic pressure and climate change ave dried Lop Nor and forced the Loplyks to turn into farmers. This rticle discusses their adaptation strategies from an ethnobiological iewpoint.

  • 39.
    Tafon, Ralph Voma
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Saunders, Fred P.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Power and resistance in Cameroon: strategies, intentionality, intersectionality, and shifting spaces and identities2015In: Journal of Political Power, ISSN 2158-379X, E-ISSN 2158-3803, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 321-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how forest communities in Cameroon engage in social transformation when faced with social injustices and uneven power relations in their interactions with local state authorities and transnational corporations. It focuses on the different strategies that marginalized resource-dependent communities employ in resisting existing forms of domination manifested in public–private-community forest governance relations. We show how power operates in closed governance spaces to work against equitable, democratic and effective policy-making. We take as a point of departure that resistance or social change cannot be understood in isolation from power. Moreover, we engage with the intentionality debate and make the case that some forms of resistance are goal oriented in character. We reveal how disenfranchised communities, using powerful traditional ritual as a form of public protest, can effectively open up closed spaces and obtain effective participation in processes denied them. Our findings have significance for resistance and power debates relating to intentionality, intersectionality and outcomes.

  • 40.
    Tafon, Ralph Voma
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Saunders, Fred P.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Power Relations and Cassava: Conservation and Development in Cameroon2015In: Journal of Environment and Development, ISSN 1070-4965, E-ISSN 1552-5465, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 82-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linking conservation and development activities requires local institutional change that can deliver global conservation as well as local socioeconomic benefits. Participatory approaches are considered a key element to this end, although recent research demonstrates that they may reinforce existing inequitable governance systems. This article examines microinstitutional formations and development interventions in the Mount Cameroon National Park. The study found that blending new governance approaches with traditional institutions at Mount Cameroon National Park led to diminished participation of the project and a failure to listen to and deliver meaningful development opportunities to Bavenga villagers. The article concludes that while local participation and governance institutions constitute laudable additions to Integrated Conservation and Development Projects, the implications of reproducing traditional authority structures must be carefully considered, and locally grounded development opportunities need to be better embedded into these projects.

  • 41.
    Zavatti, Francesco
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, History.
    The Fears Connected to the Oresund’s Bridge in the Twentieth Century2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Zvar Hurtig, Robert
    Södertörn University College, School of Life Sciences.
    Food Habit Transitions in the Urban Areas of Low-Income Countries: A study on how globalization and urbanization influence food habits among primary pupils in Babati town, Tanzania2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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