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  • 1.
    Dravins, Christina
    et al.
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools.
    Besouw, Rachel van
    ISVR, University of Southampton.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Kuške, Sandra
    Latvian Children's Hearing Centre.
    Exploring and enjoying non-speech sounds through a cochlear implant: The therapy of music2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and other Implantable Technologies: Stockholm Sweden, June 30-July 3, 2010, Stockholm: Karolinska University Hospital , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cochlear implant technology was initially designed to promote reception of speech sounds; however, music enjoyment remains a challenge. Music is an influential ingredient in our well-being, playing an important role in our cognitive, physical and social development. For many cochlear implant recipients it is not feasible to communicate how sounds are perceived, and consequently the benefits of music listening may be reduced. Non-speech sounds may also be important to persons with multiple functional deficits that relay on information additional to verbatim for participating in communication. Deaf-born children with multiple functional deficits constitute a special vulnerable group as lack of reaction to sound often is discouraging to caregivers. Individually adapted tools and methods for sound awareness may promote exploration and appreciation of the information mediated by the implant. Two current works involving habilitation through sound production and music will be discussed. First, the results from a pilot study aiming at finding musical toys that can be adapted to help children explore their hearing with engaging sounds and expressive interfaces will be presented. The findings indicate that children with multiple functional deficits can be more inclined to use the auditory channel for communication and play than the caregivers would anticipate. Second, the results of a recent questionnaire study, which compared the music exposure and appreciation of preschool cochlear implant recipients with their normally hearing peers will be presented. The data from this study indicate that preschool children with cochlear implants spend roughly the same amount of time interacting with musical instruments at home and watching television programmes and DVDs which include music. However, the data indicate that these children receive less exposure to recorded music without visual stimuli and show less sophisticated responses to music. The provision and supported use of habilitation materials which encourage interaction with music might therefore be beneficial.

  • 2. Erbenius, Theo
    et al.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
    Unlearning Cisnormativity in the Clinic: Enacting Transgender Reproductive Rights in Everyday Patient Encounters2018In: Journal of International Women's Studies, ISSN 1539-8706, E-ISSN 1539-8706, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 27-39, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Dravins, Christina
    Riga Stradiņš University, Latvia .
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Ljudskrapan/The Soundscraper: Sound exploration for children with complex needs, accommodating hearing aids and cochlear implants2011In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011, Sound and music Computing network , 2011, p. 70-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a system for accommodating active listening for persons with hearing aids or cochlear implants, with a special focus on children with complex needs, for instance at an early stage of cognitive development and with additional physical disabilities. The system is called Ljudskrapan (or the Soundscraper in English) and consists of a software part in Pure data and a hardware part using an Arduino microcontroller with a combination of sensors. For both the software and hardware development, one of the most important aspects was to always ensure that the system was flexible enough to cater for the very different conditions that are characteristic of the intended user group. The Soundscraper has been tested with 25 children with good results. An increased attention span was reported, as well as surprising and positive reactions from children where the caregivers were unsure whether they could hear at all. The sound generating models, the sensors and the parameter mapping were simple, but provided a controllable and complex enough sound environment even with limited interaction.

  • 4.
    Hiraga, Rumi
    et al.
    Tsukuba University of Technology, Tsukuba, Japan .
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Sound Preferences of Persons with Hearing Loss Playing an Audio-Based Computer Game2013In: IMMPD 2013: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM international workshop on Interactive multimedia on mobile & portable devices, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 25-30Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kjellsdotter, Mira
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Erfarenheter i dialog: En vetenskaplig essä om boendestödjarens lärande2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This scientific essay starts with a literary composition from the author’s personal experience as a community mental health worker. The purpose of the essay is to articulate the practice of the community mental health worker starting with the literary composition and by utilizing Aristotle The Nicomachean Ethics and Donald A. Schön Educating the Reflective Practitioner reflect over what type of knowledge the mental health worker uses and how it is possible to attain that knowledge. The methods consist of writing in addition to a phenomenological procedure regarding the literary composition and hermeneutic exploring.

    A personal and historical background is presented, along with a selection of research regarding community mental health work. This is followed by the authors discussion, starting with the theory of Aristotle, regarding the purpose of community mental health work and the type of knowledge that is located in the literary composition. The author continues to discuss how the community mental health worker learns this knowledge with starting from the theory of Schön. After that instructions are discussed in another context, from the conceptual artist Sol LeWitt. The essay ends with a conclusion by the author that the practical knowledge is central within the community mental health work even if instructions can make the author attentive on the middle way.

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