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  • 1.
    Ambagtsheer, Frederike
    et al.
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    de Jong, Jessica
    Central Division of the National Police, the Netherlands.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Lund University.
    van Balen, Linde
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Orr, Zvika
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.
    Byström, Ingela
    Lund University.
    Weimar, Willem
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: A Case Study Report2016In: Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations / [ed] Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ambagtsheer, Frederike
    et al.
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    van Balen, Linde
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Ivanovski, Ninoslav
    University of St. Cyril and Methodius, Macedonia.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Lund University.
    Byström, Ingela
    Lund University.
    Weimar, Willem
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Organ Recipients who Paid for Kidney Transplantation abroad: A Report2016In: Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations / [ed] Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Pascalev, Assya
    et al.
    Bulgarian Center for Bioethics.
    de Jong, Jessica
    Central Division of the National Police, the Netherlands.
    Ambagtsheer, Frederike
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Lundin, Susanne
    Lund University.
    Ivanovski, Ninoslav
    University of St. Cyril and Methodius, Macedonia.
    Codreanu, Natalia
    Renal Foundation, Moldova.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Yankov, Jordan
    Bulgarian Center for Bioethics, Bulgaria.
    Frunza, Mihaela
    Academic Society for the Research of Religions and Ideologies, Romania.
    Byström, Ingela
    Lund University.
    Bos, Michael
    Eurotransplant International Foundation, the Netherlands.
    Weimar, Willem
    Erasmus MC University Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: A Comprehensive Literature Review2016In: Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations / [ed] Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Pascalev, Assya
    et al.
    Bulgarian Center for Bioethics, Bulgaria.
    Van Assche, Kristof
    Bioethics Institute Ghent, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Sándor, Judit
    Center for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine, Central European University, Hungary.
    Codreanu, Natalia
    Renal Foundation, Moldova.
    Naqvi, Anwar
    Department of Urology and Centre of Biomedical Ethics and Culture, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Pakistan.
    Gunnarson, Martin
    Avdelningen för etnologi, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, Lunds universitet.
    Frunza, Mihaela
    Academic Society for the Research of Religions and Ideologies, Romania.
    Yankov, Jordan
    Bulgarian Center for Bioethics, Bulgaria.
    Protection of Human Beings Trafficked for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Recommendations2016In: Transplantation Direct, ISSN 2373-8731, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-4, article id e59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents a comprehensive set of recommendations for protection of human beings who are trafficked for the purpose of organ removal or are targeted for such trafficking. Developed by an interdisciplinary group of international experts under the auspices of the project Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal (also known as the HOTT project), these recommendations are grounded in the view that an individual who parts with an organ for money within an illegal scheme is ipso facto a victim and that the crime of trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal (THBOR) intersects with the crime of trafficking in organs. Consequently, the protection of victims should be a priority for all actors involved in antitrafficking activities: those combating organ-related crimes, such as health organizations and survivor support services, and those combating trafficking in human beings, such as the criminal justice sectors. Taking into account the special characteristics of THBOR, the authors identify 5 key stakeholders in the protection of human beings trafficked for organ removal or targeted for such trafficking: states, law enforcement agencies and judiciary, nongovernmental organizations working in the areas of human rights and antitrafficking, transplant centers and health professionals involved in transplant medicine, and oversight bodies. For each stakeholder, the authors identify key areas of concern and concrete measures to identify and protect the victims of THBOR. The aim of the recommendations is to contribute to the development of a nonlegislative response to THBOR, to promote the exchange of knowledge and best practices in the area of victim protection, and to facilitate the development of a policy-driven action plan for the protection of THBOR victims in the European Union and worldwide.

  • 5.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    A Defense of the Phenomenological Account of Health and Illness2019In: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, ISSN 0360-5310, E-ISSN 1744-5019, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 459-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large slice of contemporary phenomenology of medicine has been devoted to developing an account of health and illness that proceeds from the first-person perspective when attempting to understand the ill person in contrast and connection to the third-person perspective on his/her diseased body. A proof that this phenomenological account of health and illness, represented by philosophers, such as Drew Leder, Kay Toombs, Havi Carel, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Kevin Aho, and Fredrik Svenaeus, is becoming increasingly influential in philosophy of medicine and medical ethics is the criticism of it that has been voiced in some recent studies. In this article, two such critical contributions, proceeding from radically different premises and backgrounds, are discussed: Jonathan Sholl's naturalistic critique and Talia Welsh's Nietzschean critique. The aim is to defend the phenomenological account and clear up misunderstandings about what it amounts to and what we should be able to expect from it.

  • 6.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Empathy as a necessary condition of phronesis: a line of thought for medical ethics2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 293-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empathy is a thing constantly asked for and stressed as a central skill and character trait of the good physician and nurse. To be a good doctor or a good nurse one needs to be empathic-one needs to be able to feel and understand the needs and wishes of patients in order to help them in the best possible way, in a medical, as well as in an ethical sense. The problem with most studies of empathy in medicine is that empathy is poorly defined and tends to overlap with other related things, such as emotional contagion, sympathy, or a caring personality in general. It is far from clear how empathy fits into the general picture of medical ethics and the framework of norms that are most often stressed there, such as respect for autonomy and beneficience. How are we to look upon the role and importance of empathy in medical ethics? Is empathy an affective and/or cognitive phenomenon only, or does it carry moral significance in itself as a skill and/or virtue? How does empathy attain moral importance for medicine? In this paper I will attempt to show that a comparison with the Aristotelian concept of phronesis makes it easier to see what empathy is and how it fits into the general picture of medical ethics. I will argue that empathy is a basic condition and source of moral knowledge by being the feeling component of phronesis, and, by the same power, it is also a motivation for acting in a good way.

  • 7.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    En revolution för reproduktionen2014In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 18 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Livet, tänkandet och driften mot oordning2013In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 18 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenological bioethics: medical technologies, human suffering, and the meaning of being alive2017Book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Phenomenology of pregnancy and the ethics of abortion2018In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I investigate the ways in which phenomenology could guide our views on the rights and/or wrongs of abortion. To my knowledge very few phenomenologists have directed their attention toward this issue, although quite a few have strived to better understand and articulate the strongly related themes of pregnancy and birth, most often in the context of feminist philosophy. After introducing the ethical and political contemporary debate concerning abortion, I introduce phenomenology in the context of medicine and the way phenomenologists have understood the human body to be lived and experienced by its owner. I then turn to the issue of pregnancy and discuss how the embryo or foetus could appear for us, particularly from the perspective of the pregnant woman, and what such showing up may mean from an ethical perspective. The way medical technology has changed the experience of pregnancy-for the pregnant woman as well as for the father and/or other close ones-is discussed, particularly the implementation of early obstetric ultra-sound screening and blood tests (NIPT) for Down's syndrome and other medical defects. I conclude the article by suggesting that phenomenology can help us to negotiate an upper time limit for legal abortion and, also, provide ways to determine what embryo-foetus defects to look for and in which cases these should be looked upon as good reasons for performing an abortion.

  • 11.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Psykiatrins etik2016In: Psykiatri / [ed] Jörgen Herlofson et al., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 2 omarb., p. 69-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    På spaning efter det goda dödandet2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 5 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The Body as Gift, Resource or Commodity?: Heidegger and the Ethics of Organ Transplantation2010In: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, ISSN 1176-7529, E-ISSN 1872-4353, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three metaphors appear to guide contemporary thinking about organ transplantation. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating organs, the underlying perspective from the side of the state, authorities and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall rather be understood as a resource. The acute scarcity of organs, which generates a desperate demand in relation to a group of potential suppliers who are desperate to an equal extent, leads easily to the gift’s becoming, in reality, not only a resource, but also a commodity. In this paper, the claim is made that a successful explication of the gift metaphor in the case of organ transplantation and a complementary defence of the ethical primacy of the giving of organs need to be grounded in a philosophical anthropology which considers the implications of embodiment in a different and more substantial way than is generally the case in contemporary bioethics. I show that Heidegger’s phenomenology offers such an alternative, with the help of which we can understand why body parts could and, indeed, under certain circumstances, should be given to others in need, but yet are neither resources nor properties to be sold. The phenomenological exploration in question is tied to fundamental questions about what kind of relationship we have to our own bodies, as well as about what kind of relationship we have to each other as human beings sharing the same being-in-the-world as embodied creatures.

  • 14.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    The phenomenology of empathy in medicine: an introduction2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 245-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an introduction to a thematic section on the phenomenology of empathy in medicine, attempting to provide an expose of the field. It also provides introductions to the individual articles of the thematic section.

  • 15.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    To die well: the phenomenology of suffering and end of life ethics2019In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents an account of suffering as a multi-level phenomenon based on concepts such as mood, being-in-the-world and core life value. This phenomenological account will better allow us to evaluate the hardships associated with dying and thereby assist health care professionals in helping persons to die in the best possible manner. Suffering consists not only in physical pain but in being unable to do basic things that are considered to bestow meaning on one's life. The suffering can also be related to no longer being able to be the person one wants to be in the eyes of others, to losing one's dignity and identity. These three types of suffering become articulated by a narrative that holds together and bestows meaning on the whole life and identity of the dying person. In the encounter with the patient, the health-care professional attempts to understand the suffering-experience of the patient in an empathic and dialogic manner, in addition to exploring what has gone wrong in the patient's body. Matters of physician assisted suicide and/or euthanasia-if it should be legalized and if so under which conditions-need to be addressed by understanding the different levels of human suffering and its positive counterpart, human flourishing, rather than stressing the respect for patient autonomy and no-harm principles, only. In this phenomenological analysis the notions of vulnerability and togetherness, ultimately connecting to the political-philosophical issues of how we live together and take care of each other in a community, need to be scrutinized.

  • 16.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Vi har förlorat känslan för lidandet2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 20 oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Vi ser inte människan för alla kroppsdelar2013In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 12 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    What is an organ?: Heidegger and the phenomenology of organ transplantation2010In: Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, ISSN 1386-7415, E-ISSN 1573-0980, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 179-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the question of what an organ is from a phenomenological perspective. Proceeding from the phenomenology of being-in-the-world developed by Heidegger in Being and Time and subsequent works, it compares the being of the organ with the being of the tool. It attempts to display similarities and differences between the embodied nature of the organs and the way tools of the world are handled. It explicates the way tools belong to the totalities of things of the world that are ready to use and the way organs belong to the totality of a bodily being able to be in this very world. In so doing, the paper argues that while the organ is in some respects similar to a bodily tool, this tool is nonetheless different from the tools of the world in being tied to the organism as a whole, which offers the founding ground of the being of the person. However, from a phenomenological point of view, the line between organs and tools cannot simply be drawn by determining what is inside and outside the physiological borders of the organism. We have, from the beginning of history, integrated technological devices (tools) in our being-in-the-world in ways that make them parts of ourselves rather than parts of the world (more organ- than tool-like), and also, more recently, have started to make our organs more tool-like by visualising, moving, manipulating, and controlling them through medical technology. In this paper, Heidegger’s analysis of organ, tool, and world-making is confronted with this development brought about by contemporary medical technology. It is argued that this development has, to a large extent, changed the phenomenology of the organ in making our bodies more similar to machines with parts that have certain functions and that can be exchanged. This development harbours the threat of instrumentalising our bodily being but also the possibility of curing or alleviating suffering brought about by diseases which disturb and destroy the normal functioning of our organs.

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