sh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Gustaf
    Södertörn University College, School of Discourse Studies.
    Ungdomsdiabetes: ett livslångt kontrollbehov2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 2.
    Björkehag, Jonathan
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Business Studies.
    Seglare, Kristin
    Södertörn University College, School of Business Studies.
    Innovationssystem för medicinsk teknik i Stockholm: En undersökning av centrala omständigheter för organisatorisk samverkan2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction In order to foster innovation of medical devices within the healthcare sector, a collaboration project, PUSH, has been initiated including the hospitals managed by the Stockholm County Council. The collaboration aims to capture ideas from employees and turn them into so called “high-practice” products as well as facilitate the possibilities for medical device companies to try out their products in the settings of healthcare. Collaborations for innovation, comparable to the PUSH project, can be found in both Swedish and foreign regions, but some of them fail to survive due to obstacles affecting the progress of each collaboration. Avoiding the same destiny will be a challenge to the PUSH project.

    Purpose The purpose is to search for factors affecting organizational collaboration concerning innovation systems for medical device development. The study is focusing on ”high-practice” products within the PUSH project.

    Theoretical approach In order to emphasize factors affecting innovation, theories regarding innovation systems, clusters and networks has been studied hence they  all concern organizational collaboration.

    Method The study’s qualitative approach is based on a semi deductive method. The analysis derives from a deductive outlook consistent with chosen theories, whereas collected data is used inductively to stress and enlarge part of the theoretical framework. Semi structured interviews, earlier research and evaluations constitutes most of the collected data.

    Results and analysis Experience from collaborations for innovation shows that some affecting factors can’t be influenced by collaborators, as political decisions and medical device directives. Collaborators can however affect circumstances such as connections and networking, which is significant to manage the innovation process; from idea to commercialization. An explicit focus on commercialization is important to the collaboration project’s surviving opportunities. A central cause why innovation projects don’t last is lack of funding, both for commercializing certain products as well as for retaining and developing existing innovation structures.

    Conclusion Collaborating projects should utilize existing structures and complement their networks to involve extensive competency. Decision makers need to decide whether innovation ventures shall be part of the County Council’s assignment. To fulfil the visions of the collaboration project, a policy common to all participants in the forthcoming innovation project needs to be stated, regarding ownership relations, risk sharing, funding and sharing of profits.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 3.
    Björkehag, Jonathan
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, School of Business Studies.
    Seglare, Kristin
    Södertörn University College, School of Business Studies.
    Karolinska Testbädd för Telemedicin och eHälsa: En analys av medicintekniska företags behov och krav på en samverkansmiljö för produktutveckling på Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to study the demand for a testbed for telemedicine and to analyze the medical device-developing companies’ requirements on the testbed’s facilities when collaborating with the healthcare sector in their product development. The study’s aim is to result in a commercialization plan for Karolinska Testbed for telemedicine and eHealth, at the department of Biomedical Engineering at Karolinska University Hospital. During the study, 19 interviews and 6 telephone-interviews has been held with people from the medical device industry, hospitals, potential funders and collaboration structures which foster medical device development. A web-survey has been sent to 279 companies within the fields of medical technologies, IT and telecom, to quantify the results from the interviews.

    The study describes how the clinical research on medical technologies has changed over the last decades and what the situation is like today. Present and forthcoming challenges to the Swedish health care system is presented, like demographic changes, increasing healthcare-costs, expensive treatments and the scarcity of medical device innovations being commercialized. Obstacles affecting the medical device development are studied, including the regulatory differences between IT and medical devices. An analysis of the research on product and service development is also looked at from the perspectives on how the medical device companies develop their products, which is derived from both interviews and the web-survey.

    The result shows that medical device companies rely upon the ability to collaborate with the hospitals in different phases of their product development process and that there is an extensive need for a testbed structure amongst companies. The companies that collaborate with hospitals do it primarily because it makes their products more adaptive to functioning in the settings of healthcare, time to market and development costs can be decreased and it facilitates the process when validating the functionality of their products. Several companies have their ways of collaborating with hospital wards whilst others explicitly lack indispensable collaboration structures. The study has identified some companies which have shown interest in collaborating with Testbed Karolinska for telemedicine and eHealth and other ones whom wish to receive more information on what the testbed can offer them. In the commercialization plan it is suggested that Karolinska Testbed for telemedicine and eHealth shall focus on their niche and elaborate the competency which the companies doesn’t have. It is also suggested that the Testbed continues the work with developing the internal organization within Karolinska to enable efficient, flexible and qualitative collaboration between companies and the clinics at Karolinska University Hospital.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Karolinska Testbädd för Telemedicin och eHälsa : J Björkehag, K Seglare
  • 4.
    Elmersjö, Magdalena
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work.
    Hoffmann, E.
    Hollertz, K.
    Hultqvist, S.
    Delaktighet i forskningsprocessen: PAR i samtida kontext2022In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, E-ISSN 2003-5624, Vol. 29, no 3-4, p. 285-304Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fredriksson, J.
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital / Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Groth, K.
    Karolinska University Hospital / Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology.
    Bergius, H.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Rylander, E.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Effects of mobile video-mediated communication for health care professionals in advanced home care of children2014In: 27th IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems: 27–29 May 2014 New York, New York : proceedings, Los Alamitos, California: IEEE Computer Society, 2014, p. 363-368Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the use of a mobile video-conferencing tool (MVCT) in advanced home care of children. We present the results from a qualitative study where we have evaluated mobile video communication between the patient's home and the hospital unit. Our results show that mobile video enhances communication between home care teams and medical staff at the unit, makes more effective use of practitioners' time and that the equipment have additional values for staff that extend beyond video communication. Challenges identified are related to technical problems, limitations in the MVCT's design and the concern that the inability to handle problems may affect health care professionals' role as an authority. The benefits of the MVCT rely to a great extent on individual users' creativity and the willingness of key actors in the organization's management to find ways of improving the present home care format.

  • 6.
    Habicht, Triin
    et al.
    Estonian Health Insurance Fund, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Part II: Country profiles of health system responses to the crisis. Estonia2015In: Economic crisis, health systems and health in Europe: Country experiences / [ed] Maresso A, Mladovsky P, Thomson S, Sagan A, Karanikolos M, Richardson E, Cylus J, Evetovits T, Jowett M, Figueras J, Kluge H., Copenhagen: WHO Regional Office for Europe / European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies , 2015, p. 371-374Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kofler, Tanja
    Södertörn University College, School of Business Studies.
    Vågar du bli gammal?: en fallstudie av ett äldreboendes arbete med kvalitetssäkring i form av brukarinflytande2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 15 points / 22,5 hpStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 8.
    Lilja, Agneta
    Södertörn University College, School of Culture and Communication.
    [Recension av:] Jonas Frykman & Kjell Hansen, I ohälsans tid: sjukskrivningar och kulturmönster i det samtida Sverige2009In: Upsala Nya Tidning, ISSN 1104-0173, no 2 juniArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Schenk, Linda
    KTH, Filosofi.
    Comparison of Data Used for Setting Occupational Exposure Limits2010In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 249-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has previously been shown that occupational exposure limits (OELs) for the same substance can vary significantly between different standard-setters. The work presented in this paper identifies the steps in the process towards establishing an OEL and how variations in those processes could account for these differences. This study selects for further scrutiny substances for which the level of OELs vary by a factor of 100, focussing on 45 documents concerning 14 substances from eight standard-setters. Several of the OELs studied were more than 20 years old and based on outdated knowledge. Furthermore, different standard-setters sometimes based their OELs on different sets of data, and data availability alone could not explain all differences in the selection of data sets used by standard-setters. While the interpretation of key studies did not differ significantly in standard-setters' documentations, the evaluations of the key studies' quality did. Also, differences concerning the critical effect coincided with differences in the level of OELs for half of the substances.

  • 10.
    Shutzberg, Mani
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Literal Tricks of the Trade: The Possibilities and Contradictions of Swedish Physicians’ Everyday Resistance in the Sickness Certification Process2020In: Journal of Resistance Studies, ISSN 2001-9947, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 8-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the ways Swedish General practitioners (GPs) informally deal with the stricter standards of sickness certification and the implications of understanding these ways in terms of ‘resistance.’ In recent decades, procedural and bureaucratic changes within the Swedish sickness benefit system have curtailed physicians’ clinical discretion with regards to the sickness benefit approval for patients. By both formal and informal means, the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) has consolidated its power over the decision-making process. Despite widespread dissatisfaction among physicians with the current system, acts of open defiance do not seem to occur. However, as shown in a recent qualitative study, Swedish General practitioners have developed informal ‘techniques’ (ranging from simple exaggerations in the certificates to complex constructions of apparent objectivity) for intentionally circumventing the stricter sickness certification standards. Taking that study as a point of departure, this article will consider the use of techniques as a form of everyday resistance. Three dimensions of ambiguity arise which require further attention, namely: (1) the multiple motives and shifting target of resistance; (2) the complex blend of power and powerlessness which defines the situation of GPs and their resistance, and (3) the fundamental ambiguity of the resistant act of issuing sickness certificates tactically, as a particular mix of compliance and resistance.

  • 11.
    Shutzberg, Mani
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Unsanctioned techniques for having sickness certificates accepted: a qualitative exploration and description of the strategies used by Swedish general practitioners2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 10-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To explore informal and unsanctioned techniques general practitioners (GPs) employ as a means to increase the likelihood of sickness certificate approval, following the Swedish Social Insurance Agency's (SSIA's) consolidation of the gatekeeping role in sickness benefit evaluation.

    DESIGN: Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 20 GPs working in Swedish primary care. A thematic analysis of the transcribed material was carried out to map different techniques employed by the practitioners.

    RESULTS: Eight techniques were identified, particularly with respect to the way in which the sickness certificate is written to ensure approval by the SSIA. The identified techniques were most commonly adopted when the patient's case was perceived to be at high risk for rejection by the SSIA (such as psychiatric illnesses, chronic pain etc.).

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings imply that the informal and unsanctioned techniques are complex and ambiguous. They are used intentionally and covertly. The study also suggests that, while the consolidation of SSIA's gatekeeping role may have resolved some sickness absence issues, a consequence may be that GPs develop unsanctioned techniques to ensure compliance.

  • 12.
    Silow Kallenberg, Kim
    Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Ethnology. Röda Korsets Högskola.
    Det som sitter i väggarna: tvångsvård mellan stabilitet och förändring2017In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 26, no 3-4, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Starzmann, K.
    et al.
    R&D Centre Skaraborg Primary Care, Skövde, Sweden.
    Shutzberg, Mani
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Validity must be discussed2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 388-389Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Evidensbaseringsrörelsen och det goda omdömet: en kritisk betraktelse2010In: Ikaros : tidskrift om människan och vetenskapen, ISSN 1796-1998, no 2, p. 33-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Communication, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Medicinens humaniora: vad skulle det kunna vara? = The Humanities of Medicine: What Could This Be?2010In: En annan humaniora - en annan tid = Another humanities - another time / [ed] Carl Cederberg & Hans Ruin, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2010, p. 53-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Medicinens humaniora: vad skulle det kunna vara? = The Humanities of Medicine: What Could This Be?
  • 16.
    Svenaeus, Fredrik
    Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Centre for Studies in Practical Knowledge.
    Är åldrandet en sjukdom för vilken det snart finns en bot?: Recension av David Sinclairs bok ”Livslängd: Varför vi åldras – och varför vi inte behöver göra det"2021In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 4Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet, Sverige.
    Kuratorns roll i transnationella och transkulturella processer2022In: Perspektiv på hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorns mångfacetterade arbete / [ed] Joakim Isaksson; Sara Lilliehorn; Helena Hansson, Stockholm: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 147-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Svärd, Veronica
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Berglund, E.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Björk Brämberg, E.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, N.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Engblom, M.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Friberg, E.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Coordinators in the return-to-work process: Mapping their work models2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: In recent decades, many countries have implemented return-to-work coordinators to combat high rates of sickness absence and insufficient collaboration in the return-to-work process. The coordinators should improve communication and collaboration between stakeholders in the return-to-work process for people on sickness absence. How they perform their daily work remains unexplored, and we know little about to what extent they collaborate and perform other work tasks to support people on sickness absence. This study examines which work models return-to-work coordinators use in primary healthcare, psychiatry and orthopaedics in Sweden. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all 82 coordinators in one region (89% response rate) with questions about the selection of patients, individual patient support, healthcare collaboration, and external collaboration. Random forest classification analysis was used to identify the models. RESULTS: Three work models were identified. In model A, coordinators were more likely to select certain groups of patients, spend more time in telephone than in face-to-face meetings, and collaborate fairly much. In Model B there was less patient selection and much collaboration and face-to-face meetings. Model C involved little patient selection, much telephone contact and very little collaboration. Model A was more common in primary healthcare, model C in orthopaedics, while model B was distributed equally between primary healthcare and psychiatry. CONCLUSION: The work models correspond differently to the coordinator's assignments of supporting patients and collaborating with healthcare and other stakeholders. The differences lie in how much they actively select patients, how much they collaborate, and with whom. Their different distribution across clinical contexts indicates that organisational demands influence how work models evolve in practice. 

  • 19.
    Urbonaite, Miglė
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Evaluation of non-pharmaceutical intervention effectiveness in Covid-19 pandemic by using excess mortality metric2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The study focuses on finding a methodology for evaluating the effectiveness of the nonpharmaceutical intervention in the face of a new pathogen entering the population. Different interventions can have different effectiveness levels in different populations; thus, studying possible correlations and effectiveness among different groups is essential. With better knowledge of the topic, the outbreak management could be done more cost-effectively, reducing the need for antibiotics, vaccines, and possible reduction of infectious diseases caused burden in developing regions. Furthermore, the study aims to determine the ways of using excess mortality as an evaluation technique for nonpharmaceutical interventions used in the Covid-19 pandemic. 

    METHOD: The variables in time-series format were used to calculate a cross-correlation score alongside other correlation coefficient tests. With the cross-correlation, the lag will be established to estimate how the variables correlate in the timeline. In addition, the study will attempt to establish the connections between different nonpharmaceutical interventions and their strengths and different age groups.

    RESULTS: The most frequent lag scores identified were 1 with 16 observations and 2 with 9 observations. The highest lag score was 4, which was observed once for the dataset of Hungary. The correlation between excess mortality and different harshness of NPI's was calculated. The correlation coefficient ranges from -0.3 to -0.39, indicating an overall low to medium correlation. The highest correlation was detected with stay-at-home requirements (-0.36), workplace closing (-0.37), and gathering restrictions (-0.39). In the final step, age-based correlations were established. The correlation ranged from 0.26 – 0.36, indicating an overall medium correlation. The lowest correlation can be seen in the youngest age group, 15-64 (correlation coefficient of 0.26), while the highest correlation of 0.36 can be seen in the 75-84 age group. Surprisingly the age group 85+ had a little lower correlation than the 75-84 age group.

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: A stronger correlation between excess mortality and stringency index was detected in the countries with a higher death per capita. The two groups of intervention effectiveness were established: more effective (school closing, workplace closing, public event limitation, gathering restriction, and stay at home requirement) and less effective (public transport limitation, restriction on internal movement, international travel control, public information campaigns, protection of elderly campaigns). This suggests that NPI effectiveness depends on population size. In the age-group-based analysis, the correlation became stronger with the age increase, indicating nonpharmaceutical intervention effectiveness against high mortality in older adults.   

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf