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  • 1. Akre, O
    et al.
    Ekbom, A
    Sparén, Pär
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 4, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Tretli, S
    Body size and testicular cancer2000In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 92, no 13, p. 1093-1096Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Frängsmyr, L.
    et al.
    Israelsson, A.
    Teglund, Stephen
    Södertörn University, Avdelning Naturvetenskap. Karolinska Institute.
    Matsunaga, T.
    Hammarström, S.
    Evolution of the carcinoembryonic antigen family. Structures of CGM9, CGM11 and pregnancy-specific glycoprotein promoters2000In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 63-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that the genes of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family can be divided into three subgroups, the CEA subgroup (n = 12), the pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG) subgroup (n = 11), and a third subgroup (n = 6). To further characterize the CEA gene family, we have determined the genomic structures of CGM9 and CGM11, analyzed the promoter regions of all eleven PSGs, studied the CGM15-PSG13 intergenic region and the evolutionary relationships between the CEA family genes. CGM9, a typical CEA subgroup member, was a pseudogene with the exon structure [5'UTR-L-L/N-TM-Cyt-3'UTR]. CGM11 contained a mixture of exons derived from CEA and PSG subgroup genes. The formula of the CGM11 pseudogene was [5'UTRL- L/N-C-3'UTR]. Thus both genes lacked the IgC2-like domains typically found in CEA subfamily members. The upstream promoter regions of all eleven PSGs were characterized. All PSG promoters lacked the classical TATA and CCAAT elements, but had putative PEA3 box(es), CACCC box(es), a RARE box, and poly (dG-dT) repeats of different lengths. Five PSGs also had an SP1 site. The complete 10-kb intergenic region between CGM15 and PSG13 was sequenced. Clusters of different types of repetitive sequences were seen. The time of divergence of the CEA and PSG subfamilies was estimated to be 107.7 ± 17.1 million years, or at about the time of human-rodent divergence. Models for the evolution of CEA and PSG and the third family subgroup genes are proposed.

  • 3. Lagerlund, M
    et al.
    Sparén, Pär
    Södertörn University, Avdelning 4, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition).
    Thurfjell, E
    Ekbom, A
    Lambe, M
    Predictors of non-attendance in a population-based mammography screening programme; socio-demographic factors and aspects of health behaviour2000In: European Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 0959-8278, E-ISSN 1473-5709, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of non-attendance in a population-based mammography-screening programme in central Sweden, on the basis of telephone interviews with 434 non-attendees and 515 attendees identified in a mammography register, Non-attendance was studied in relation to sociodemographic factors, indicators of general health behaviour, self-rated health and experience of cancer in others and own cancer or breast problems. Being single or being non-employed were the only important socio-demographic predictors of non-attendance. Non-attendance was more likely among women who never visited a dentist, had not visited a doctor in 5 years, had never used oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy, had never had cervical smear tests, never drank alcohol, smoked regularly, reported no breast cancer in family or friends or own breast problems, We conclude that socio-demographic factors alone do not appear to constitute strong predictors of non-attendance, General health behaviour and previous experience of cancer and breast disease seem to be more important factors. Our results suggest that in the setting of population-based outreach mammography programmes, previous contacts with the health care system and encouragement from health professionals represent determinants of attendance.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Yu, David
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Nordqvist, Hampus
    Stockholm South Hospital, Sweden.
    Özenci, Volkan
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Single-site sampling versus multi-site sampling for blood cultures; A retrospective clinical study2022In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 60, no 2, article id e0193521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The performance of blood cultures (BC) relies on optimal sampling. Sepsis guidelines do not specify which sampling protocol to use, but recommend two sets of BC bottles, each set containing one aerobic and one anaerobic bottle. For the single-site sampling (SSS) protocol, only one venipuncture is performed for all four bottles. The predominating multi-site sampling (MSS) protocol implies that BC bottles are collected from two separate venipuncture sites. The aim of this study was to compare SSS and MSS. Primary outcomes were number of BC sets collected, sample volume and diagnostic performance. Methods This was a retrospective clinical study comparing BC results in an emergency department before and after changing the sampling protocol to SSS from MSS. All BC samples were incubated in the BacT/ALERT BC system. Results The analysis included 5,248 patients before and 5,364 patients after the implementation of SSS. There was a significantly higher proportion of positive BCs sampled with SSS compared to MSS, 1,049/5,364 (19.56%) and 932/5,248 (17.76%) respectively (P=0.018). This difference was due to a higher proportion of solitary BC sets (two BC bottles) in MSS. Analyzing only patients with the recommended four BC bottles, there was no difference in positivity. SSS had a higher proportion of BC bottles with the recommended sample volumes of 8-12 ml than MSS (P<0.001). Conclusions Changing the sampling protocol to SSS from MSS resulted in higher positivity rates, higher sample volume and fewer solitary BC sets. These advantages of SSS should be considered in future sepsis guidelines.

  • 5. Leinsalu, Mall
    et al.
    Rahu, Mati
    Time trends in cancer mortality in Estonia, 1965–19891993In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 914-918Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Olsson, Ida
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Berrez, Jean-Marc
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Leipus, Arunas
    CHORI, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, USA / Umeå University.
    Östlund, Cecilia
    Columbia University, New York, USA.
    Mutvei, Ann
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    The arginine methyltransferase Rmt2 is enriched in the nucleus and co-purifies with the nuclear porins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup1002007In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 313, no 9, p. 1778-1789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arginine methylation is a post-translational modification of proteins implicated in RNA processing, protein compartmentalization, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. In a screen for proteins associated with the nuclear envelope in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have identified the arginine methyltransferase Rmt2, previously shown to methylate the ribosomal protein L12. By indirect immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionations we demonstrate here that Rmt2 has nuclear and cytoplasmic localizations. Biochemical analysis of a fraction enriched in nuclei reveals that nuclear Rmt2 is resistant to extractions with salt and detergent, indicating an association with structural components. This was supported by affinity purification experiments with TAP-tagged Rmt2. Rmt2 was found to co-purify with the nucleoporins Nup49, Nup57 and Nup100, revealing a novel link between arginine methyltransferases and the nuclear pore complex. In addition, a genome-wide transcription study of the rmt2 Delta mutant shows significant downregulation of the transcription of MYO1, encoding the Type II myosin heavy chain required for cytokinesis and cell separation.

  • 7.
    Onischenko, Evgeny A.
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Karolinska Institute.
    Crafoord, Ellinor
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences. Karolinska Institute.
    Hallberg, Einar
    Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
    Phosphomimetic mutation of the mitotically phosphorylated serine 1880 compromises the interaction of the transmembrane nucleoporin gp210 with the nuclear pore complex2007In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 313, no 12, p. 2744-2751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) reversibly disassemble and reassemble during mitosis. Disassembly of the NPC is accompanied by phosphorylation of many nucleoporins although the function of this is not clear. It was previously shown that in the transmembrane nucleoporin gp210 a single serine residue at position 1880 is specifically phosphorylated during mitosis. Using amino acid substitution combined with live cell imaging, time-lapse microscopy and FRAP, we investigated the role of serine 1880 in binding of gp210 to the NPC in vivo An alanine subtitutions mutant (S1880A) was significantly more dynamic at the NPC compared to the wild-type protein, suggesting that serine 1880 is important for binding of gp210 to the NPC. Moreover a glutamate substitution (S1880E) closely mimicking phosphorylated serine specifically interfered with incorporation of gp210 into the NPC and compromised its post-mitotic recruitment to the nuclear envelope of daughter nuclei. our findings are consistent with the idea that mitotic phosphorylation acts to dissociate gp210 from the structural elements of the NPC.

  • 8.
    Petros, Nuhamin Gebrewold
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Alvarsson, Jesper
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Psychology. Stockholm Health Care Services, Sweden.
    Hadlaczky, Gergö
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm Health Care Services, Sweden.
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ottaviano, Manuel
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Gonzalez-Martinez, Sergio
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Carletto, Sara
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale
    University of Pisa, Italy.
    Valenza, Gaetano
    University of Pisa, Italy.
    Carli, Vladimir
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Predictors of the Use of a Mental Health–Focused eHealth System in Patients With Breast and Prostate Cancer: Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling Analysis of a Prospective Study2023In: JMIR Cancer, E-ISSN 2369-1999, Vol. 9, article id e49775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background: eHealth systems have been increasingly used to manage depressive symptoms in patients with somatic illnesses. However, understanding the factors that drive their use, particularly among patients with breast and prostate cancer, remains a critical area of research.

    Objective: This study aimed to determine the factors influencing use of the NEVERMIND eHealth system among patients with breast and prostate cancer over 12 weeks, with a focus on the Technology Acceptance Model.

    Methods: Data from the NEVERMIND trial, which included 129 patients with breast and prostate cancer, were retrieved. At baseline, participants completed questionnaires detailing demographic data and measuring depressive and stress symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory–II and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale–21, respectively. Over a 12-week period, patients engaged with the NEVERMIND system, with follow-up questionnaires administered at 4 weeks and after 12 weeks assessing the system’s perceived ease of use and usefulness. Use log data were collected at the 2- and 12-week marks. The relationships among sex, education, baseline depressive and stress symptoms, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness (PU), and system use at various stages were examined using Bayesian structural equation modeling in a path analysis, a technique that differs from traditional frequentist methods.

    Results: The path analysis was conducted among 100 patients with breast and prostate cancer, with 66% (n=66) being female and 81% (n=81) having a college education. Patients reported good mental health scores, with low levels of depression and stress at baseline. System use was approximately 6 days in the initial 2 weeks and 45 days over the 12-week study period. The results revealed that PU was the strongest predictor of system use at 12 weeks (βuse at 12 weeks is predicted by PU at 12 weeks=.384), whereas system use at 2 weeks moderately predicted system use at 12 weeks (βuse at 12 weeks is predicted by use at 2 weeks=.239). Notably, there were uncertain associations between baseline variables (education, sex, and mental health symptoms) and system use at 2 weeks, indicating a need for better predictors for early system use.

    Conclusions: This study underscores the importance of PU and early engagement in patient engagement with eHealth systems such as NEVERMIND. This suggests that, in general eHealth implementations, caregivers should educate patients about the benefits and functionalities of such systems, thus enhancing their understanding of potential health impacts. Concentrating resources on promoting early engagement is also essential given its influence on sustained use. Further research is necessary to clarify the remaining uncertainties, enabling us to refine our strategies and maximize the benefits of eHealth systems in health care settings.

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  • 9.
    Söderman, Mirkka
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Sophiahemmet University, Sweden.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Friberg, Emilie
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Oncologists' experiences of and prerequisites for sickness certification tasks: A nationwide questionnaire study.2021In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 30, no 4, article id e13414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oncologists frequently have sickness certification (SC) consultations, however, little is known about their experiences of such tasks.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate oncologists' experiences of organisational prerequisites for SC tasks, and if lack of resources was related to experiencing SC as problematic.

    METHOD: Questionnaire data from 342 oncologists in Sweden were used for descriptive statistics and to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

    RESULTS: The majority (92.2%) had SC consultations weekly; 17.8% of the oncologists experienced such consultations as problematic weekly. About a third appreciated the national guidelines for SC (34.5%) and had joint routines/policies regarding SC at their clinic (29.7%). Experiencing SC consultations as problematic was associated with stating not having enough resources for such work (OR 3.47; 95% CI 1.92-6.25). Lack of resources was associated with: experiencing lack of competence in insurance medicine (3.34; 1.92-5.82), conflicts with patients regarding SC (4.22; 1.96-9.07), finding it problematic to manage the two roles as medical expert and as the patient's treating physician (3.31; 2.04-5.34), or to assess work capacity (2.28; 1.46-3.56).

    CONCLUSION: Although oncologists often had SC tasks, most did not experience them as problematic weekly. However, lack of resources for SC tasks was associated with experiencing SC as problematic.

  • 10.
    Vaccarella, Salvatore
    et al.
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), France.
    Georges, Damien
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), France.
    Bray, Freddie
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), France.
    Ginsburg, Ophira
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), France; U.S. National Cancer Institute Maryland, USA.
    Charvat, Hadrien
    International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), France.
    Martikainen, Pekka
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Deboosere, Patrick
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.
    Bopp, Matthias
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Leinsalu, Mall
    Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Estonia.
    Artnik, Barbara
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Lorenzoni, Valentina
    Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Italy.
    De Vries, Esther
    Pontificia Universidad Bogota, Colombia.
    Marmot, Michael
    University College London Institute of Health Equity, England.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Imperial College, England.
    Mackenbach, Johan
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Nusselder, Wilma
    Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Socioeconomic inequalities in cancer mortality between and within countries in Europe: a population-based study2023In: The Lancet Regional Health: Europe, E-ISSN 2666-7762, Vol. 25, article id 100551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Reducing socioeconomic inequalities in cancer is a priority for the public health agenda. A systematic assessment and benchmarking of socioeconomic inequalities in cancer across many countries and over time in Europe is not yet available.

    METHODS: Census-linked, whole-of-population cancer-specific mortality data by socioeconomic position, as measured by education level, and sex were collected, harmonized, analysed, and compared across 18 countries during 1990-2015, in adults aged 40-79. We computed absolute and relative educational inequalities; temporal trends using estimated-annual-percentage-changes; the share of cancer mortality linked to educational inequalities.

    FINDINGS: Everywhere in Europe, lower-educated individuals have higher mortality rates for nearly all cancer-types relative to their more highly-educated counterparts, particularly for tobacco/infection-related cancers [relative risk of lung cancer mortality for lower- versus higher-educated = 2.4 (95% confidence intervals: 2.1-2.8) among men; = 1.8 (95% confidence intervals: 1.5-2.1) among women]. However, the magnitude of inequalities varies greatly by country and over time, predominantly due to differences in cancer mortality among lower-educated groups, as for many cancer-types higher-educated have more similar (and lower) rates, irrespective of the country. Inequalities were generally greater in Baltic/Central/East-Europe and smaller in South-Europe, although among women large and rising inequalities were found in North-Europe (relative risk of all cancer mortality for lower- versus higher-educated ≥1.4 in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and the England/Wales). Among men, rate differences (per 100,000 person-years) in total-cancer mortality for lower-vs-higher-educated groups ranged from 110 (Sweden) to 559 (Czech Republic); among women from approximately null (Slovenia, Italy, Spain) to 176 (Denmark). Lung cancer was the largest contributor to inequalities in total-cancer mortality (between-country range: men, 29-61%; women, 10-56%). 32% of cancer deaths in men and 16% in women (but up to 46% and 24%, respectively in Baltic/Central/East-Europe) were associated with educational inequalities.

    INTERPRETATION: Cancer mortality in Europe is largely driven by levels and trends of cancer mortality rates in lower-education groups. Even Nordic-countries, with a long-established tradition of equitable welfare and social justice policies, witness increases in cancer inequalities among women. These results call for a systematic measurement, monitoring and action upon the remarkable socioeconomic inequalities in cancer existing in Europe.

    FUNDING: This study was done as part of the LIFEPATH project, which has received financial support from the European Commission (Horizon 2020 grant number 633666), and the DEMETRIQ project, which received support from the European Commission (grant numbers FP7-CP-FP and 278511). SV and WN were supported by the French Institut National du Cancer (INCa) (Grant number 2018-116). PM was supported by the Academy of Finland (#308247, # 345219) and the European Research Council under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 101019329). The work by Mall Leinsalu was supported by the Estonian Research Council (grant PRG722).

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