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Ambient air pollution and suicide in Tokyo, 2001-2011
Nagasaki Univiversity,Nagasaki , Japan / University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan / University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 201, 194-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Background: Some evidence suggests an association may exist between the level of air pollution and suicide mortality. However, this relation has been little studied to date. The current study examined the association in Tokyo, Japan. Methods: Suicide mortality data for Tokyo for the 11-year period 2001-2011 were obtained together with data on four air pollutants: fine particulate matter (PM2.5), suspended particulate matter (SPM), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). A time-stratified case-crossover study design was used to examine the daily association between the level of air pollution and suicide mortality. Results: During the study period there were 29,939 suicide deaths. In stratified analyses an interquartile range (IQR) increase in the same-day concentration of NO2 was linked to increased suicide mortality among those aged under 30 (percentage change: 6.73%, 95% Cl: 0.69-13.12%). An IQR increase in PM25 and SO2 was associated with a 10.55% (95% Cl: 2.05-19.75%) and 11.47% (95% Cl: 3.60-19.93%) increase, respectively, in suicide mortality among widowed individuals for mean exposure on the first four days (average lags 0-3). Positive associations were observed for the air pollutants in the summer although associations were reversed in autumn. Limitations: We relied on monitoring data to approximate individual exposure to air pollutants. Conclusions: Higher levels of air pollution are associated with increased suicide mortality in some population subgroups in Tokyo. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms linking air pollutants and suicide in this setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 201, 194-202 p.
Keyword [en]
Air pollution, Case-crossover study, Japan, Mortality, Suicide
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30616DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.05.006ISI: 000377392900027PubMedID: 27240312ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84971482805OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-30616DiVA: diva2:949401
Available from: 2016-07-19 Created: 2016-07-18 Last updated: 2016-07-19Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, Andrew
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