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Aircraft noise and speech intelligibility in an outdoor living space
Stockholms universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2059-0514
Stockholms universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
Stockholms universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
2014 (English)In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 135, no 6, 3455-3462 p.Article in journal (Refereed) PublishedText
Abstract [en]

Studies of effects on speech intelligibility from aircraft noise in outdoor places are currently lacking. To explore these effects, first-order ambisonic recordings of aircraft noise were reproduced outdoors in a pergola. The average background level was 47 dB L-Aeq. Lists of phonetically balanced words (L-ASmax,L- word = 54 dB) were reproduced simultaneously with aircraft passage noise (L-ASmax,L- noise = 72-84 dB). Twenty individually tested listeners wrote down each presented word while seated in the pergola. The main results were (i) aircraft noise negatively affects speech intelligibility at sound pressure levels that exceed those of the speech sound (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N < 0), and (ii) the simple A-weighted S/N ratio was nearly as good an indicator of speech intelligibility as were two more advanced models, the Speech Intelligibility Index and Glasberg and Moore's [J. Audio Eng. Soc. 53, 906-918 (2005)] partial loudness model. This suggests that any of these indicators is applicable for predicting effects of aircraft noise on speech intelligibility outdoors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 135, no 6, 3455-3462 p.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29574DOI: 10.1121/1.4874625ISI: 000337110200049OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-29574DiVA: diva2:905280
Note

Som manuskript i avhandling. As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2014-07-25 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2016-09-19Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Perspectives on wanted and unwanted sounds in outdoor environments: Studies of masking, stress recovery, and speech intelligibility
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives on wanted and unwanted sounds in outdoor environments: Studies of masking, stress recovery, and speech intelligibility
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

An acoustic environment contains sounds from various sound sources, some generally perceived as wanted, others as unwanted. This thesis examines the effects of wanted and unwanted sounds in acoustic environments, with regard to masking, stress recovery, and speech intelligibility.

In urban settings, masking of unwanted sounds by sounds from water structures has been suggested as a way to improve the acoustic environment. However, Study I showed that the unwanted (road traffic) sound was better at masking the wanted (water) sound than vice versa, thus indicating that masking of unwanted sounds with sounds from water structures may prove difficult. Also, predictions by a partial loudness model of the auditory periphery overestimated the effect of masking, indicating that centrally located informational masking processes contribute to the effect. Some environments have also been shown to impair stress recovery; however studies using only auditory stimuli is lacking. Study II showed that a wanted (nature) sound improve stress recovery compared to unwanted (road traffic, ambient) sounds. This suggests that the acoustic environment influences stress recovery and that wanted sounds may facilitate stress recovery compared to unwanted sounds. An additional effect of unwanted sounds is impeded speech communication, commonly measured with speech intelligibility models. Study III showed that speech intelligibility starts to be negatively affected when the unwanted (aircraft sound) masker have equal or higher sound pressure level as the speech sound. Three models of speech intelligibility (speech intelligibility index, partial loudness and signal–to–noise ratio) predicted this effect well, with a slight disadvantage for the signal–to–noise ratio model. Together, Study I and III suggests that the partial loudness model is useful for determining effects of wanted and unwanted sounds in outdoor acoustic environments where variations in sound pressure level are large. But, in environments with large variations in other sound characteristics, models containing predictions of central processes would likely produce better results.

The thesis concludes that wanted and unwanted characteristics of sounds in acoustic environments affect masking, stress recovery, and speech intelligibility, and that auditory perception models can predict these effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, 2013. 55 p.
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29573 (URN)978-91-7447-807-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-12-18, David Magnussonsalen (U31), Frescati Hagväg 8, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defence the following paper was unpublished and has a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript

Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2016-09-19Bibliographically approved

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Alvarsson, Jesper J.
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