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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and suicide ideation and attempts: Findings from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), Tokyo, Japan / University of Tokyo, Japan.
Universitat de Barcelona, Spain / Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
Uppsala universitet / Yale University, USA / Säter Forensic Psychiatric Clinic.
National Institute of Mental Health, National Center for Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), Tokyo, Japan.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 189, 321-328 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have an increased risk of engaging in suicidal behavior. This study examined this association in the general adult population where there has been little research.

METHODS: Data came from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007. This was a representative sample of the English adult household population aged ≥16 years (N=7403). The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) was used to obtain information on ADHD symptoms. The Clinical Interview Schedule Revised (CIS-R) was used to assess six forms of common mental disorder (CMD). Information was also obtained on the lifetime and past 12-month occurrence of suicide ideation and attempts. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine these associations.

RESULTS: After adjusting for comorbid disorders, adults with more ADHD symptoms had significantly higher odds for suicidal behavior. When a single cut-off point was used to classify ADHD (ASRS score ≥14), odds ratios ranged from 1.62 (lifetime suicide attempt) to 2.43 (past 12-month suicide ideation). When ADHD symptoms were categorized by strata (I: a score of 0-9; II: 10-13; III: 14-17; IV: 18-24), compared to adults in stratum I, those in stratum IV had odds ratios ranging from 2.16 (lifetime suicide ideation) to 3.68 (past 12-month suicide attempt).

LIMITATIONS: ADHD and suicide data came from self-reports which may have been affected by socially desirable responding.

CONCLUSIONS: ADHD symptoms were linked to suicidal behavior after controlling for comorbid conditions. Health care professionals should be alerted to the increased suicide risk among adults with ADHD symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 189, 321-328 p.
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28629DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2015.09.061ISI: 000364170200048PubMedID: 26469299ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84944262635OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-28629DiVA: diva2:864306
Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, Andrew
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