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The association between psychosis and severe pain in community-dwelling adults: Findings from 44 low- and middle-income countries
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). Universitat de Barcelona, Spain / SIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). niversity of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan / National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
2015 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 69, 19-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies examining the association between schizophrenia and pain have produced mixed results and data on sub-threshold psychosis or psychotic symptoms and pain are scarce. This study assessed the association between psychosis and severe pain among community-dwelling adults in 44 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where no data exists.Data on 235,370 adults aged ≥18 years from the World Health Survey (WHS) 2002-2004 were analyzed. The presence of past 12-month psychotic symptoms was established using four questions from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Participants were categorized into four mutually exclusive groups based on whether they had at least one psychotic symptom and/or a lifetime psychosis or schizophrenia diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association between psychosis and past 30-day severe pain. The prevalence of severe pain among those with 0, 1, 2, ≥3 psychotic symptoms was 8.7%, 16.7%, 21.8%, 30.5% respectively. Compared to those with no psychotic symptoms or diagnosis, the ORs (95%CIs) were: at least one symptom without diagnosis [2.17 (1.99-2.38)]; no symptom with diagnosis [2.33 (1.71-3.17)]; at least one symptom and diagnosis [4.27 (3.20-5.71)]. Associations were partly mediated by chronic physical conditions, anxiety, and depression. Despite some limitations such as the use of a single-item question to assess pain, the results of this study suggest that individuals with psychotic symptoms or a psychosis diagnosis should be systematically assessed for pain, and if necessary, receive treatment for pain and its underlying conditions. Future research on the effect of pain management on psychosis outcome is warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 69, 19-26 p.
Keyword [en]
Low-income countries, Middle-income countries, Pain, Psychotic symptoms, Schizophrenia
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28276DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.07.020ISI: 000361927800004PubMedID: 26343590ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84940850638OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-28276DiVA: diva2:854787
Available from: 2015-09-17 Created: 2015-09-17 Last updated: 2017-06-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
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