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Subclinical psychosis and suicidal behavior in England: Findings from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey
Universitat de Barcelona, Spain / SIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). The University of Tokyo, Japan / National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Ogawa-Higashi, Japan.
Universitat de Barcelona, Spain / SIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
2015 (English)In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 168, no 1-2, 62-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Psychotic disorders have been associated with suicidality but information on the association between subclinical psychosis and suicidality in the general adult population is scarce. Methods: Data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (n = 7403) were analyzed. This was a nationally representative survey of the English adult household population (aged ≥. 16. years). Five types of psychotic symptoms (hypomania, thought control, paranoia, strange experience, auditory hallucination) occurring in the past 12. months were assessed with the Psychosis Screening Questionnaire. Participants with probable or definite psychosis were excluded. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between psychotic symptoms and suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in the past 12. months. Results: The prevalence of at least one psychotic symptom was 5.4%. After adjusting for potential confounders including mental disorders, each individual psychotic symptom was significantly associated with suicidal ideation with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 3.22 to 4.20. With the exception of thought control, all symptoms were also associated with significantly higher odds for suicide attempt (ORs 3.95 to 10.23). Having at least one psychotic symptom was associated with ORs of 3.13 (95%CI 2.09-4.68) and 3.84 (95%CI 1.67-8.83) for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt respectively. In addition, a greater number of psychotic symptoms was associated with higher odds for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Conclusions: Psychotic symptoms, regardless of the type, were independently associated with higher odds for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Assessment and management of suicide risk in individuals with psychotic symptoms may be important for suicide prevention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 168, no 1-2, 62-67 p.
Keyword [en]
Epidemiology, Psychotic symptom, Suicidal behavior, Suicide
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28190DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2015.07.041ISI: 000361826400010PubMedID: 26255564ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84942372333OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-28190DiVA: diva2:854773
Available from: 2015-09-17 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2015-10-23Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, Andrew
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