sh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
“This Space Belongs to Us!”: Protest Spaces in Times of Accelerating Capitalism
Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5879-2130
2015 (English)In: Critical Perspectives on Social Media and Protest: Between Control and Emancipation / [ed] Lina Dencik; Oliver Leistert, London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015, p. 89-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Protest movements are fundamentally about the production and control of space. Whether in a discursive or physically sense protesters aim to carve out spaces that give room to their political causes. The negotiation and contestation of the production of space has potentially changed in the context of social media that connect activists over vast distances and in real time. In line with that, media scholars, urban geographers and sociologists have attributed changes in the production and perception of space to emerging media technologies that are extending the human body (McLuhan 1964), contributing to deterritorialization  (Tomlinson 1999) and space-time compression (Harvey 1990). What are then the strategies of protest movements that are actively challenging the hegemonic logic of the production of space and how are the strategies relating to communication technologies? What are the consequences of changes in the production of protest spaces for activism in terms of temporality? This chapter investigates the changes in the production of space of protest movements in the context of advancing capitalism that is increasingly based on digital communication technologies. In that sense it contributes to the discussion of how contentious politics and the production of space are changing with social media while contextualizing these changes historically by putting current protests into dialogue with previous movements and their media practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015. p. 89-106
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26764Local ID: 829/42/2013ISBN: 9781783483365 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-26764DiVA, id: diva2:799373
Projects
Kris och kritik – kritiska medier handlingar i turbulenta tider
Funder
Swedish Research Council, SH829/42/2013
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2017-03-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(155 kB)63 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 155 kBChecksum SHA-512
8ebe0bd7e70c4743b9237feffd84d758c3938802b4493023510c985c59154d8d5ad7b4ee0e42c5454f43068a2e284cf459bd2ee2dd2226433d27d2cbcb6758a1
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Kaun, Anne

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kaun, Anne
By organisation
Media and Communication Studies
Media and Communications

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 63 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 995 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf