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Loneliness and health in Eastern Europe: findings from Moscow, Russia
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9565-5004
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4453-4760
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7736-4465
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2015 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 29, no 4, 403-410 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To examine which factors are associated with feeling lonely in Moscow, Russia, and to determine whether loneliness is associated with worse health.

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

METHODS: Data from 1190 participants were drawn from the Moscow Health Survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with feeling lonely and whether loneliness was linked to poor health.

RESULTS: Almost 10% of the participants reported that they often felt lonely. Divorced and widowed individuals were significantly more likely to feel lonely, while not living alone and having greater social support reduced the risk of loneliness. Participants who felt lonely were more likely to have poor self-rated health (odds ratio [OR]: 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38-3.76), and have suffered from insomnia (OR: 2.43; CI: 1.56-3.77) and mental ill health (OR: 2.93; CI: 1.88-4.56).

CONCLUSIONS: Feeling lonely is linked to poorer health in Moscow. More research is now needed on loneliness and the way it affects health in Eastern Europe, so that appropriate interventions can be designed and implemented to reduce loneliness and its harmful impact on population well-being in this setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 29, no 4, 403-410 p.
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26568DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2014.12.021ISI: 000353186600016PubMedID: 25744109Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928215517OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-26568DiVA: diva2:794780
Available from: 2015-03-12 Created: 2015-03-12 Last updated: 2017-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, AndrewKoyanagi, AiLeinsalu, MallFerlander, Sara

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