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Geopolitical Imagination of the Russian New Media between Eurasian Union and Russian World
Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES).
2014 (English)In: Eurasia 2.0: Post-Soviet Geopolitics in the Age of the New Media: An International Conference, Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Uppsala University, 3-4 November 2014, 2014, 5- p.Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Eurasian Union and Russian World have recently been the most important, although hardly compatible concepts of Russian geopolitics. Though they became entirely common terms of reference in contemporary political discourses, bear no officially defined ideological meaning. There is clear contradiction that Russia enters into the Eurasian Economic Union (as of the 1 January 2015) on equal basis with other countries and at the same time propagates the ideas of the Russian World, which supports dominance of Russian language and Russian nationalism as an unquestionable priority.Nevertheless, there exists popular discourse in the Russian blogosphere, which attempts to combine 'Eurasian Union' and 'Russian World' into persuasive ideological narrative. In this paper I try to analyse the main arguments of this public debate, its chief commentators and the instruments of creating public discourse surrounding these notions. Significantly enough, the sites that provide platform for this discussion in the Internet have an image of serious international academic institutions or governmentally sponsored think tanks (which they are not). Clearly, bloggers who initiate this discussion on such sites (existing not only in Russia, but over whole post-Soviet space) aspire of some leverage in political decision making, they imitate closeness to Kremlin, which makes their statements seemingly weightier. Central authorities, instead, try to distance themselves from these discussions and bloggers. They do not acknowledge their existence on the official web-sites and do not enter into discussions, probably fearing the Web 2.0 discussions as charged with dissident potential per se. I am hypothesizing that bloggers try to find the common denomination for the notions of Eurasian Union and Russian World and governmental official try to intentionally distance themselves from clearly formulated ideological statements, because any clarification means constrain and necessity to follow certain path. Now Kremlin has all irons in the fire and refuses to arrest the meaning of key political concepts

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. 5- p.
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-25298OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-25298DiVA: diva2:766215
Conference
"Eurasia 2.0: Post-Soviet Geopolitics and New Media", at UCRS Centrum för Rysslandsstudier, Uppsala, 3-4 Nov. 2014
Available from: 2014-11-26 Created: 2014-11-26 Last updated: 2014-12-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf