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Loneliness: Its Correlates and Association with Health Behaviours and Outcomes in Nine Countries of the Former Soviet Union
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of London.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9565-5004
University of London.
University of London.
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7, e67978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Background: Research suggests that the prevalence of loneliness varies between countries and that feeling lonely may be associated with poorer health behaviours and outcomes. The aim of the current study was to examine the factors associated with loneliness, and the relationship between feeling lonely and health behaviours and outcomes in the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU) - a region where loneliness has been little studied to date.

Methods: Using data from 18,000 respondents collected during a cross-sectional survey undertaken in nine FSU countries Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine - in 2010/11, country-wise logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine: the factors associated with feeling lonely; the association between feeling lonely and alcohol consumption, hazardous drinking and smoking; and whether feeling lonely was linked to poorer health (i.e. poor self-rated health and psychological distress).

Results: The prevalence of loneliness varied widely among the countries. Being divorced/widowed and low social support were associated with loneliness in all of the countries, while other factors (e.g. living alone, low locus of control) were linked to loneliness in some of the countries. Feeling lonely was connected with hazardous drinking in Armenia, Kyrgyzstan and Russia but with smoking only in Kyrgyzstan. Loneliness was associated with psychological distress in all of the countries and poor self-rated health in every country except Kazakhstan and Moldova.

Conclusions: Loneliness is associated with worse health behaviours and poorer health in the countries of the FSU. More individual country-level research is now needed to formulate effective interventions to mitigate the negative effects of loneliness on population well-being in the FSU.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 7, e67978
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-20013DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0067978ISI: 000323350700068PubMedID: 23861843Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84879802690OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-20013DiVA: diva2:659138
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A052-10
Available from: 2013-10-24 Created: 2013-10-24 Last updated: 2017-07-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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