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Multiresistant coagulase-negative staphylococci disseminate frequently between intubated patients in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit
Södertörn University, School of Chemistry, Biology, Geography and Environmental Science.
2004 (English)In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 8, no 1, R42-R47 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction The intensive care unit is burdened with a high frequency of nosocomial infections often caused by multiresistant nosocomial pathogens. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are reported to be the third causative agent of nosocomial infections and the most frequent cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. CoNS are a part of the normal microflora of skin but can also colonize the nasal mucosa, the lower airways and invasive devices. The main aim of the present study was to investigate colonization and the rate of cross-transmissions of CoNS between intubated patients in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit. Materials and methods Twenty consecutive patients, ventilated for at least 3 days, were included. Samples were collected from the upper and lower airways. All samples were cultured quantitatively and CoNS were identified by morphology and biochemical tests. A total of 199 CoNS isolates from 17 patients were genetically fingerprinted by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in order to identify clones and to monitor dissemination within and between patients. Results An unexpected high number of transmission events were detected. Five genotypes were each isolated from two or more patients, and 14/20 patients were involved in at least one and up to eight probable transmission events. Conclusions A frequent transmission of CoNS was found between patients in the intensive care unit. Although transmission of bacteria does not necessarily lead to infection, it is nevertheless an indication that infection control measures can be improved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 8, no 1, R42-R47 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-15496DOI: 10.1186/cc2422ISI: 000188720100006PubMedID: 14975054OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-15496DiVA: diva2:504399
Available from: 2012-02-20 Created: 2012-02-20 Last updated: 2017-07-19Bibliographically approved

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Edlund, Charlotta
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
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