sh.sePublications
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Avoidable mortality in Estonia: Exploring the differences in life expectancy between Estonians and non-Estonians in 2005-2007.
National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia / University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4453-4760
2011 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 125, no 11, 754-762 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: A considerable increase in social inequalities in mortality was observed in Eastern Europe during the post-communist transition. This study evaluated the contribution of avoidable causes of death to the difference in life expectancy between Estonians and non-Estonians in Estonia.

STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive study.

METHODS: Temporary life expectancy (TLE) was calculated for Estonian and non-Estonian men and women aged 0-74 years in 2005-2007. The ethnic TLE gap was decomposed by age and cause of death (classified as preventable or treatable).

RESULTS: The TLE of non-Estonian men was 3.53 years less than that of Estonian men, and the TLE of non-Estonian women was 1.36 years less than that of Estonian women. Preventable causes of death contributed 2.19 years to the gap for men and 0.78 years to the gap for women, while treatable causes contributed 0.67 and 0.33 years, respectively. Cardiorespiratory conditions were the major treatable causes of death, with ischaemic heart disease alone contributing 0.29 and 0.08 years to the gap for men and women, respectively. Conditions related to alcohol and substance use represented the largest proportion of preventable causes of death.

CONCLUSIONS: Inequalities in health behaviours underlie the ethnic TLE gap in Estonia, rather than inequalities in access to health care or the quality of health care. Public health interventions should prioritize primary prevention aimed at alcohol and substance use, and should be implemented in conjunction with wider social policy measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 125, no 11, 754-762 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-13415DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2011.09.005ISI: 000297154200003PubMedID: 22015210ScopusID: 2-s2.0-81255135996OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-13415DiVA: diva2:458000
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A052-10
Available from: 2011-11-21 Created: 2011-11-21 Last updated: 2016-10-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Leinsalu, Mall
By organisation
SociologySCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition)
In the same journal
Public Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 144 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link