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Contextualizing Accessibility: Interaction for Blind Computer Users
KTH.
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Computer usage today is predominantly based on graphical interaction, where the visual presentation of information is essential both for input (hand-eye coordination when using a computer mouse), and output (seeing the information on a computer screen). This can create difficulties for blind computer users, both at an individual level when interacting with a computer, and also when collaborating with other computer users.

The work presented in this thesis has investigated interaction for blind computer users in three stages. First investigating access to information by making studies on an interactive audio-only game, drawing conclusions about auditory direct manipulation and auditory interface design. Second studying collaboration between blind and sighted computer users in two different contexts, leading to questioning of commonly expressed design principles regarding access to collaboration. Finally studying accessibility in a working environment, finding out how technology, the assistive device used by the blind person, communication with others and professional knowledge interplayed to create an accessible work environment.

Based on these empirical studies, the main conclusion from this work is a proposal of a research perspective, Assistive interfaces as cooperative interfaces. Here, the context where the interface is going to be used is in focus, and cooperative and social dimensions of interaction are acknowledged and highlighted. The design and analysis of assistive devices should be highly sensitive to the socio-interactional environment, and not just focusing on the single individual using an assistive device.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH , 2008. , 88 p.
Series
Trita-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2008:10
Keyword [en]
Accessibility, contextual, blind users, auditory displays and sonification, collaboration, CSCW, working division of labour, assistive interfaces, human-computer interaction
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-12715ISBN: 978-91-7178-992-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-12715DiVA: diva2:452218
Available from: 2011-10-28 Created: 2011-10-28 Last updated: 2011-10-28Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. The quest for auditory direct manipulation: the sonified Towers of Hanoi
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The quest for auditory direct manipulation: the sonified Towers of Hanoi
2000 (English)In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies (ICDVRAT 2000) / [ed] P. Sharkey, A. Cesarani, L. Pugnetti, & A. Rizzo, 2000, 75-81 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a study of an auditory version of the game Towers of Hanoi. The goal of this study was to investigate the nature of continuos presentation and what this could mean when implementing auditory direct manipulation. We also wanted to find out if it was possible to make an auditory interface that met the requirements of a direct manipulation interface. The results showed that it was indeed possible to implement auditory direct manipulation, but using Towers of Hanoi as the underlying model restricted the possibilities of scaling the auditory space. The results also showed that having a limited set of objects, the nature of continuos presentation was not as important as how to interact with the auditory space.

National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-12711 (URN)0-7049-11-42-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2008-05-16 Created: 2011-10-28 Last updated: 2011-10-28Bibliographically approved
2. Qualitative Aspects of Auditory Direct Manipulation: A Case Study of the Towers of Hanoi
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qualitative Aspects of Auditory Direct Manipulation: A Case Study of the Towers of Hanoi
2001 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD 2001) / [ed] Jarmo Hiipakka, Helsinki: Helsinki Univ. , 2001, 16-20 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the results from a qualitative case study of an auditory version of the game Towers of Hanoi. The goal of this study was to explore qualitative aspects of auditory direct manipulation and the subjective experience from playing the game. The results show that it is important to provide a way of focusing in the auditory space. Articulatory directness was also an important issue and feedback should support the movement of the objects in the auditory space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki: Helsinki Univ., 2001
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-12712 (URN)9512255219 (ISBN)
Available from: 2008-05-16 Created: 2011-10-28 Last updated: 2011-10-28Bibliographically approved
3. Assembling the Senses: Towards the Design of Cooperative Interfaces for Visually Impaired Users
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assembling the Senses: Towards the Design of Cooperative Interfaces for Visually Impaired Users
2004 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW 2004), New York: ACM Press , 2004, 332-341 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The needs of blind and visually impaired users are seriously under-investigated in CSCW. We review work on assistive interfaces especially concerning how collaboration between sighted and blind users across different modalities might be supported. To examine commonly expressed design principles, we present a study where blind and sighted persons play a game to which the former has an auditory interface, the latter a visual one. Interaction analyses are presented highlighting features of interface design, talk and gesture which are important to the participants’ abilities to collaborate. Informed by these analyses, we reconsider design principles for cooperative interfaces for the blind.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2004
Keyword
Universal (or disability) access, assistive technologies, auditory input/output, sound in the user-interface, sonification, user interface design, CSCW, qualitative empirical methods, interaction analysis, Conversation Analysis, cross-modal interaction, collaboration
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-12713 (URN)1-58113-810-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2008-05-16 Created: 2011-10-28 Last updated: 2011-10-28Bibliographically approved
4. Supporting Cross-Modal Collaboration: Adding a Social Dimension to Accessibility
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting Cross-Modal Collaboration: Adding a Social Dimension to Accessibility
2006 (English)In: Haptic and Audio Interaction Design: First International Workshop, HAID 2006, Glasgow, UK, August 31 - September 1, 2006. Proceedings / [ed] David McGookin, Stephen Brewster, Berlin: Springer , 2006, Vol. 4129, 102-110 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a study of cross-modal collaboration, where blind and sighted persons collaboratively solve two different tasks using a prototype that has one auditory and one graphical interface. The results shows the importance of context and the design of tasks for the accessibility of cross-modal collaborative settings, as well as the importance of supporting the participation in a working division of labour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2006
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 4129
Keyword
Auditory interface, Cross modal collaboration, Cross modal collaborative settings, Artificial intelligence, Computer science, Graphical user interfaces, Handicapped persons, Logic design, Social aspects
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-12714 (URN)10.1007/11821731_10 (DOI)000240360700010 ()3-540-37595-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2008-05-16 Created: 2011-10-28 Last updated: 2011-10-28Bibliographically approved

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