sh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Major improvements, but persisting inequalities in infant survival in Estonia 1992-2002
Show others and affiliations
2006 (English)In: Central European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1210-7778, Vol. 17, no 1, 8-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Inequality in adult health increased in Estonia during the transition period after 1991. We examined inequality in infant survival from 1992 to 2002. Methods: All 132 854 singleton live births reported to the Estonian Medical Birth Registry in 1992–2001 were linked to the Estonian Mortality Database. The effect of mother's education, nationality, marital status, and place of residence on neonatal (0–27 days) and post-neonatal (28–364 days) death was evaluated in logistic regression with adjustments for maternal age, parity, smoking, sex of the infant, birth weight, and gestational age. Results: Infant mortality decreased substantially. Risk of death in neonatal period was lowest in Tartu, with a decline from 4.9/1000 in infants born in 1992–1996 to 2.1/1000 in those born in 1997–2001. Decline in neonatal mortality in other regions was from 9.2/1000 to 5.1/1000. Persisting regional differences were unexplained by mothers' nationality, education, or marital status, or the infants' length of gestation. Decline in post-neonatal mortality was less marked and although risk differences between different socio-economic groups decreased, mothers' marital status and education in particular remained strongly associated with risk of post-neonatal death [odds ratio for infants born to mothers with basic or lower education compared to university education 3.70 (95% confidence interval 2.34–5.85) in 1992–1996 and 3.56 (2.06–6.14) in 1997–2001]. Conclusions: Infant survival improved appreciably in Estonia after 1991 and risk differences between social groups decreased. The improvements were not accompanied by reduction in the strength of the effects of social characteristics on infant death measured as risk ratios.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 17, no 1, 8-16 p.
Keyword [en]
Estonia, health inequalities, infant death, neonatal death, post-neonatal death, socio-economic factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10844DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckl104OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-10844DiVA: diva2:436329
Available from: 2008-01-16 Created: 2011-08-22 Last updated: 2011-08-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Vågerö, Denny
In the same journal
Central European Journal of Public Health
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 48 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf