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Educational inequalities in mortality in four Eastern European countries: divergence in trends during the post-communist transition from 1990 to 2000
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands / National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4453-4760
Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institute.
Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, Lithuania.
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2009 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 38, 512-525 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Post-communist transition has had a huge impact on mortality in Eastern Europe. We examined how educational inequalities in mortality changed between 1990 and 2000 in Estonia, Lithuania, Poland and Hungary.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data for the years around 1990 and 2000 were used. Age-standardized mortality rates and mortality rate ratios (for total mortality only) were calculated for men and women aged 35-64 in three educational categories, for five broad cause-of-death groups and for five (seven among women) specific causes of death.

RESULTS:

Educational inequalities in mortality increased in all four countries but in two completely different ways. In Poland and Hungary, mortality rates decreased or remained the same in all educational groups. In Estonia and Lithuania, mortality rates decreased among the highly educated, but increased among those of low education. In Estonia and Lithuania, for men and women combined, external causes and circulatory diseases contributed most to the increasing educational gap in total mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Different trends were observed between the two former Soviet republics and the two Central Eastern European countries. This divergence can be related to differences in socioeconomic development during the 1990s and in particular, to the spread of poverty, deprivation and marginalization. Alcohol and psychosocial stress may also have been important mediating factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 38, 512-525 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10854DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyn248ISI: 000264890300027PubMedID: 19052117Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-64349116916OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-10854DiVA: diva2:436210
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2008-12-05 Created: 2011-08-22 Last updated: 2016-10-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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Language
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