sh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Social capital, gender and self-rated health. Evidence from the Moscow Health Survey 2004
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7736-4465
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0010-7863
2009 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 69, no 9, 1323-1332 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The state of public health in Russia is undoubtedly poor compared with other European countries. The health crisis that has characterised the transition period has been attributed to a number of factors, with an increasing interest being focused on the impact of social capital - or the lack of it. However, there have been relatively few studies of the relation between social capital and health in Russia, and especially in Moscow. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between social capital and self-rated health in Greater Moscow. The study draws on data from the Moscow Health Survey 2004, where 1190 Muscovites were interviewed. Our results indicate that among women, there is no relationship between any form of social capital and self-rated health. However, an association was detected between social capital outside the family and men’s self-rated health. Men who rarely or never visit friends and acquaintances are significantly more likely to report less than good health than those who visit more often. Likewise, men who are not members of any voluntary associations have significantly higher odds of reporting poorer health than those who are, while social capital in the family does not seem to be of importance at all. We suggest that these findings might be due to the different gender roles in Russia, and the different socializing patterns and values embedded in them. In addition, different forms of social capital provide access to different forms of resources, influence, and support. They also imply different obligations. These differences are highly relevant for health outcomes, both in Moscow and elsewhere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 69, no 9, 1323-1332 p.
Keyword [en]
Family, Friends, Gender, Moscow, Russia, Self-rated health, Social capital, Social networks, Voluntary associations
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-6624DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.08.009ISI: 000271694700008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-71749117731OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-6624DiVA: diva2:402767
Available from: 2011-03-09 Created: 2011-03-09 Last updated: 2017-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ferlander, SaraMäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
By organisation
SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition)Sociology
In the same journal
Social Science and Medicine
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 167 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf