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Spatial data replacing temporal data in population viability analyses: An empirical investigation for plants
Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences.
University of Kalmar.
Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Biology. Södertörn University, School of Life Sciences, Environmental science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0260-3978
2009 (English)In: Basic and Applied Ecology, ISSN 1439-1791, E-ISSN 1618-0089, Vol. 10, no 5, 401-410 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In conservation management, there is an urgent need for estimates of population viability and for knowledge of the contributions of different life-history stages to population growth rates. Collection of long-term demographic data from a study population is time-consuming and may considerably delay the start of proper management actions. We examined the possibility of replacing a long-term temporal data set (demographic data from several years within a population) with a short-term spatial data set (demographic data from different populations for the same subset of two continuous years) for stochastic estimates of population viability. Using matrix population models for ten perennial plant species, we found that the matrix elements of spatial data sets often deviated from those of temporal data sets and that matrix elements generally varied more spatially than temporally. The appropriateness of replacing temporal data with spatial data depended on the subset of years and populations used to estimate stochastic population growth rates (log lambda(s)). Still, the precision of log lambda(s) estimates measured as variation in the yearly change of logarithmic population size rarely differed significantly between the spatial and temporal data sets. Since a spatiotemporal comparison of matrix elements and their variation cannot be used to assess whether spatial and temporal data sets are interchangeable, we recommend further research on the topic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 10, no 5, 401-410 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-6039DOI: 10.1016/j.baae.2008.10.007ISI: 000268839500002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-67650532654OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-6039DiVA: diva2:395499
Available from: 2011-02-07 Created: 2011-02-07 Last updated: 2016-09-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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