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Effects of foliar herbivory by insects on the fitness of Raphanus raphanistrum: damage can increase male fitness.
University of California.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0260-3978
2001 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 158, no 5, 496-504 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Generally, effects of herbivory on plant fitness have been measured in terms of female reproductive success (seed production). However, male plant fitness, defined as the number of seeds sired by pollen, contributes half of the genes to the next generation and is therefore crucial to the evolution of natural plant populations. This is the first study to examine effects of insect herbivory on both male and female plant reproductive success. Through controlled field and greenhouse experiments and genetic paternity analysis, we found that foliar damage by insects caused a range of responses by plants. In one environment, damaged plants had greater success as male parents than undamaged plants. Neither effects on pollen competitive ability nor pollinator visitation patterns could explain the greater siring success of these damaged plants. Success of damaged plants as male parents appeared to be due primarily to changes in allocation to flowers versus seeds after damage. Damaged plants produced more flowers early in the season, but not more seeds, than undamaged plants. Based on total seed production, male fitness measures from the first third of the season, and flower production, we estimated that damaged and undamaged plants had equal total reproductive success at the end of the season in this environment. In a second, richer environment, damaged and undamaged plants had equal male and female plant fitness, and no traits differed significantly between the treatments. Equal total reproductive success may not be ecologically or evolutionarily equivalent if it is achieved differentially through male versus female fitness. Genes from damaged plants dispersed through pollen may escape attack from herbivores, if such attack is correlated spatially from year to year.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 158, no 5, 496-504 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-6051DOI: 10.1086/323116ISI: 000171848300004PubMedID: 18707304OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-6051DiVA: diva2:395444
Available from: 2011-02-07 Created: 2011-02-07 Last updated: 2016-09-29Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
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