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Kvinnan som den nödvändiga tomheten i mannens levnadskonst: en psykoanalytisk läsning av Bretons Nadja och Rodenbachs Det döda Brügge
Södertörn University College, School of Gender, Culture and History.
2007 (Swedish)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The starting point of this essay was the frustration I felt after having read the novel Nadja (1928) written by the French surrealist André Breton. The title promises the story of someone called Nadja but the promise stays unfulfilled. Recognition of this phenomenon, where a man writes a book about a woman, but the woman hardly is seen, made me want to examine it further.

Using the theories of the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan I analyze the relation between the male narrator and his female object. I also compare Nadja to a precursor: the novel Bruges-la-morte (1892) of the Belgian symbolist writer Georges Rodenbach. Their stories are, to a large degree, similar. The male main character meets a woman who becomes the center of his world for a short period of time, before he in Nadja rejects her, and in Bruges-la-morte kills her. What differentiates the two books mainly is, that whereas Breton uses Nadja as a tool to emancipate his unconscious in order to be able to create, Hugues tries to replace his dead wife with Jane in order to be able to desire a living object.

The setting for both stories is the City, which seems to be analogous to the Woman. I examine the possible interpretations of the notion of the City as it appears in the two novels.

The Lacanian notions of the Thing and objet petit a are essential for the understanding of the function of the Woman in these stories, I argue. Nadja is a femme-enfant, a muse, and the objet petit a for the male poet, i.e. the narrator of Nadja. Jane, the woman in Bruges-la-morte, is a femme fatale, and the Thing for the main character Hugues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Huddinge: Institutionen för genus, kultur och historia , 2007. , 40 p.
Keyword [sv]
psykoanalys, Jacques Lacan, objet petit a, Tinget, surrealism, André Breton, femme-enfant, musa, symbolism, Georges Rodenbach, Staden, Slavoj Žižek
National Category
General Literature Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-1416OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-1416DiVA: diva2:15494
Uppsok
humaniora/teologi
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2007-12-11 Created: 2007-12-11

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(114 kB)1465 downloads
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5f7e0b464d868807a095918e5a17266cd56ba18fc0f236c958a204c4034f53970a684185
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School of Gender, Culture and History
General Literature Studies

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf