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The Role of Gender in the Associations Among Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms, Anger, and Aggression in Russian Adolescents
Uppsala University / Karolinska Institutet.
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been linked to anger and aggressive behavior in adult and veteran populations. However, research on the associations among anger, aggression, and PTSD in adolescents is lacking, particularly regarding differences between the sexes. To address this research gap, we used self-report data from Russian adolescents (N = 2,810; age range: 13-17 years) to perform a full path analysis examining the associations between PTSD symptoms and the emotional (anger traits) and cognitive (rumination) components of anger as well as physical/verbal and social aggression, after adjusting for depressive symptoms. We also examined the interaction effects between PTSD symptoms and sex on anger and aggression. The results indicated that girls scored higher on measures of anger and PTSD symptoms, ds = 0.20-0.32, whereas boys scored higher on measures of physical and verbal aggression, d = 0.54. Clinical levels of PTSD symptoms were associated with anger rumination, β = .16, and trait anger, β = .06, and an interaction effect for PTSD symptoms and sex was found for aggression, whereby boys with clinical levels of PTSD symptoms reported more physical/verbal and social aggression, βs = .05 and .20, respectively. Our findings suggest that PTSD symptoms may have an important impact on anger, anger rumination, and aggression during adolescence. In particular, boys seem to have an increased risk for aggressive behavior in the presence of PTSD symptoms. The present results highlight the importance of taking anger and aggression into account when evaluating PTSD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020.
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Psychiatry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40692DOI: 10.1002/jts.22502ISI: 000530931500001PubMedID: 32384585Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85085063343OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-40692DiVA, id: diva2:1430143
Available from: 2020-05-13 Created: 2020-05-13 Last updated: 2020-06-04Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, Andrew

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