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Tabloid journalism and tabloidization
Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3794-2662
2020 (English)In: Oxford Research Encyclopaedia of Communication, no February 28, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tabloid journalism has long been a highly contested news form. With a sensationalist ap­proach and an easily digested mix of entertainment and news, it has often attracted mass audiences at the same time as it has stirred controversy and raised concern about its im­pact on public discourse. Originating in the tabloid newspaper, associated both with a small newspaper format and a particular news style, the term “tabloid” is today consid­ered to characterize a range of other media content, extending to popular TV programsand certain kinds of online news. The rise and development of tabloid journalism, in com­bination with wider processes shaping the media, has moreover led to a debate about“tabloidization,” involving ideas about shifting priorities in journalism and the media landscape as a whole.

Although tabloidization has no standard definition, an overview of empirical research us­ing the concept as a starting point highlights analyses of various media, historical peri­ods, and media markets, adding to understandings of tabloidization as multi-faceted and context-bound. Such a process, furthermore, has been viewed both as a possible threat to the public sphere and as potentially entailing democratizing elements, relating to long-standing depictions of tabloid journalism as either “dumbing down” or “reaching out.” Yet contemporary analysis in this field has tended to paint a more complex picture of both phenomena as well as pointing to emerging questions around the category of tabloid jour­nalism in digital settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. no February 28, p. 1-23
Keywords [en]
tabloid journalism, tabloids, tabloidisation, popular journalism, tabloid culture, infotainment, soft news, public sphere, commercial television, popular press, journalism studies
National Category
Media and Communications Languages and Literature
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40295DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.013.877OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-40295DiVA, id: diva2:1410865
Available from: 2020-03-02 Created: 2020-03-02 Last updated: 2020-03-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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