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Childhood physical neglect and psychotic experiences: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
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2020 (English)In: Early Intervention in Psychiatry, ISSN 1751-7885, E-ISSN 1751-7893Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: Childhood adversities have been linked to an increased risk for psychosis. However, as yet, there has been comparatively little research on the effects of neglect. This study examined the association between childhood physical neglect and psychotic experiences (PEs) in a general population sample.

METHODS: Data were analysed from 2308 individuals collected during the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Information on lifetime PEs was collected with the WHO-CIDI Psychosis Screen. Respondents also reported on five forms of childhood neglect (went hungry, went without necessities, went unsupervised, lacked medical care, chores too difficult/dangerous). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations.

RESULTS: In models adjusted for sociodemographic and psychiatric disorder variables, aggregated physical neglect scores (continuous/dichotomized) were associated with significantly increased odds for any lifetime PEs. All individual forms of neglect except went without necessities (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.50) were significantly associated with PEs with ORs ranging from 1.28 (95% CI: 1.08-1.51, went unsupervised) to 1.53 (95% CI: 1.19-1.97, went without medical care). In models that were further adjusted for co-occurring forms of neglect and childhood physical abuse, doing chores that were too difficult/dangerous continued to be associated with significantly increased odds for PEs (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.03-1.61).

CONCLUSIONS: Childhood physical neglect is associated with significantly increased odds for PEs in the general population. Screening for childhood adversities and PEs among potential patients may be important for the early detection of individuals at high risk for psychosis, as well as for formulating comprehensive and effective treatment plans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2020.
Keywords [en]
NCS-R, United States, epidemiology, neglect, psychotic experiences
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40214DOI: 10.1111/eip.12932ISI: 000512532200001PubMedID: 32048480Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85079407973OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-40214DiVA, id: diva2:1393178
Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, Andrew

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